Late Pleistocene Archaeology and Ecology in the Far Northeast

Author: Claude Chapdelaine

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 1603447903

Category: Social Science

Page: 264

View: 4294

The Far Northeast, a peninsula incorporating the six New England states, New York east of the Hudson, Quebec south of the St. Lawrence River and Gulf of St. Lawrence, and the Maritime Provinces, provided the setting for a distinct chapter in the peopling of North America. Late Pleistocene Archaeology and Ecology in the Far Northeast focuses on the Clovis pioneers and their eastward migration into this region, inhospitable before 13,500 years ago, especially in its northern latitudes. Bringing together the last decade or so of research on the Paleoindian presence in the area, Claude Chapdelaine and the contributors to this volume discuss, among other topics, the style variations in the fluted points left behind by these migrating peoples, a broader disparity than previously thought. This book offers not only an opportunity to review new data and interpretations in most areas of the Far Northeast, including a first glimpse at the Cliche-Rancourt Site, the only known fluted point site in Quebec, but also permits these new findings to shape revised interpretations of old sites. The accumulation of research findings in the Far Northeast has been steady, and this timely book presents some of the most interesting results, offering fresh perspectives on the prehistory of this important region.
Posted in Social Science

The Archaeology of North America

Author: Dean Snow

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781597406659

Category: History

Page: 284

View: 6228

Surveys the lifeways and cultural achievements and traditions of the prehistoric peoples of the great regions of North America, as we know of them from archaeological finds and research.
Posted in History

The Archaeology of New York State

Author: William A. Ritchie

Publisher: Doubleday

ISBN: 0307820491

Category: Social Science

Page: 357

View: 1032

The most complete account of ancient man in the New York area ever published in one volume, this book traces a rich, 8000-year story of human prehistory. Beginning with the first known inhabitants, Paleo-Indian hunters who lived approximately 7000 B.C., the author gives a detailed chronological account of the complex of cultural units that have existed in the area, culminating in the Iroquois tribes encountered by the European colonists at the dawn of the seventeenth century. All of the major archaeological sites in the region are described in detail and representative artifacts from all the major cultural units are illustrated in over 100 plates and drawings. The entire account is informed by the most recently obtained radio-carbon dates. In addition to giving much new, previously unpublished information, the author has synthesized all earlier published material and from this he has drawn as many inferences as the material affords regarding the nature of these early inhabitants, where they came from, and how they lived. Each cultural unit is systematically described: its discovery and naming; its ecological and chronological setting; the physical characteristics of the related people; economy; housing and settlement pattern; dress and ornament; technology; transportation; trade relationships; warfare; esthetic and recreational activities; social and political organization; mortuary customs; and religio-magical and ceremonial customs.
Posted in Social Science

Prehistoric Archaeology on the Continental Shelf

A Global Review

Author: Amanda M. Evans,Joseph C. Flatman,Nicholas C. Flemming

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1461496357

Category: Social Science

Page: 307

View: 3119

The chapters in this edited volume present multi-disciplinary case studies of prehistoric archaeological sites located on now-submerged portions of the continental shelf. Each chapter represents an extension of the known prehistoric record beyond the modern shoreline. Case studies represent central themes of landscape change, climate change and societal development, using new technologies for mapping, monitoring and managing these sites.
Posted in Social Science

The Settlement of the American Continents

A Multidisciplinary Approach to Human Biogeography

Author: C. Michael Barton

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 9780816523238

Category: Social Science

Page: 281

View: 8006

When many scholars are asked about early human settlement in the Americas, they might point to a handful of archaeological sites as evidence. Yet the process was not a simple one, and today there is no consistent argument favoring a particular scenario for the peopling of the New World. This book approaches the human settlement of the Americas from a biogeographical perspective in order to provide a better understanding of the mechanisms and consequences of this unique event. It considers many of the questions that continue to surround the peopling of the Western Hemisphere, focusing not on sites, dates, and artifacts but rather on theories and models that attempt to explain how the colonization occurred. Unlike other studies, this book draws on a wide range of disciplinesÑarchaeology, human genetics and osteology, linguistics, ethnology, and ecologyÑto present the big picture of this migration. Its wide-ranging content considers who the Pleistocene settlers were and where they came from, their likely routes of migration, and the ecological role of these pioneers and the consequences of colonization. Comprehensive in both geographic and topical coverage, the contributions include an explanation of how the first inhabitants could have spread across North America within several centuries, the most comprehensive review of new mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosome data relating to the colonization, and a critique of recent linguistic theories. Although the authors lean toward a conservative rather than an extreme chronology, this volume goes beyond the simplistic emphasis on dating that has dominated the debate so far to a concern with late Pleistocene forager adaptations and how foragers may have coped with a wide range of environmental and ecological factors. It offers researchers in this exciting field the most complete summary of current knowledge and provides non-specialists and general readers with new answers to the questions surrounding the origins of the first Americans.
Posted in Social Science

Paleoecology of Beringia

Author: David M. Hopkins,John V. Matthews,Charles E. Schweger

Publisher: Elsevier

ISBN: 1483273407

Category: Nature

Page: 504

View: 2903

Paleoecology of Beringia is the product of a symposium organized by its editors, sponsored by the Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research, and held at the foundation's conference center in Burg Wartenstein, Austria, 8-17 June 1979. The focus of this volume is on the paradox central to all studies of the unglaciated Arctic during the last Ice Age: that vertebrate fossils indicate that from 45,000 to 11,000 years BP an environment considerably more diverse and productive than the present one existed, whereas the botanical record, where it is not silent, supports a far more conservative appraisal of the region's ability to sustain any but the sparsest forms of plant and animal life. The volume is organized into seven parts. Part 1 focuses on the paleogeography of the Beringia. The studies in Part 2 explore the ancient vegatation. Part 3 deals with the steppe-tundra concept and its application in Beringia. Part 4 examines the paleoclimate while Part 5 is devoted to the biology of surviving relatives of the Pleistocene ungulates. Part 6 takes up the presence of man in ancient Beringia. Part 7 assesses the paleoecology of Beringia during the last 40,000 years
Posted in Nature

From the Pleistocene to the Holocene

Human Organization and Cultural Transformations in Prehistoric North America

Author: C. Britt Bousman,Bradley J. Vierra

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 1603447601

Category: Social Science

Page: 346

View: 8217

The end of the Pleistocene era brought dramatic environmental changes to small bands of humans living in North America: changes that affected subsistence, mobility, demography, technology, and social relations. The transition they made from Paleoindian (Pleistocene) to Archaic (Early Holocene) societies represents the first major cultural shift that took place solely in the Americas. This event—which manifested in ways and at times much more varied than often supposed—set the stage for the unique developments of behavioral complexity that distinguish later Native American prehistoric societies. Using localized studies and broad regional syntheses, the contributors to this volume demonstrate the diversity of adaptations to the dynamic and changing environmental and cultural landscapes that occurred between the Pleistocene and early portion of the Holocene. The authors' research areas range from Northern Mexico to Alaska and across the continent to the American Northeast, synthesizing the copious available evidence from well-known and recent excavations.With its methodologically and geographically diverse approach, From the Pleistocene to the Holocene: Human Organization and Cultural Transformations in Prehistoric North America provides an overview of the present state of knowledge regarding this crucial transformative period in Native North America. It offers a large-scale synthesis of human adaptation, reflects the range of ideas and concepts in current archaeological theoretical approaches, and acts as a springboard for future explanations and models of prehistoric change.
Posted in Social Science

Paleoamerican Odyssey

Author: Kelly E. Graf,Caroline V. Ketron,Michael R. Waters

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 1623492335

Category: Social Science

Page: 584

View: 9171

As research continues on the earliest migration of modern humans into North and South America, the current state of knowledge about these first Americans is continually evolving. Especially with recent advances in human genomic studies, both of living populations and ancient skeletal remains, new light is being shed in the ongoing quest toward understanding the full complexity and timing of prehistoric migration patterns. Paleoamerican Odyssey collects thirty-one studies presented at the 2013 conference by the same name, hosted in Santa Fe, New Mexico, by the Center for the Study of the First Americans at Texas A&M University. Providing an up-to-date view of the current state of knowledge in paleoamerican studies, the research gathered in this volume, presented by leaders in the field, focuses especially on late Pleistocene Northeast Asia, Beringia, and North and South America, as well as dispersal routes, molecular genetics, and Clovis and pre-Clovis archaeology.
Posted in Social Science

The ancient Californians

Rancholabrean hunters of the Mojave Lakes country

Author: Emma Lou Davis

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 193

View: 6185

Posted in History

Across Atlantic Ice

The Origin of America's Clovis Culture

Author: Dennis J. Stanford,Bruce A. Bradley

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520275780

Category: Social Science

Page: 319

View: 6918

Argues that the Solutrean culture of coastal Spain and the European Atlantic Shelf was the ancestral industry to the North American Clovis industry.
Posted in Social Science

Emergence and Diversity of Modern Human Behavior in Paleolithic Asia

Author: Yousuke Kaifu,Masami Izuho,Ted Goebel,Hiroyuki Sato,Akira Ono

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 1623492777

Category: Social Science

Page: 592

View: 878

Despite the obvious geographic importance of eastern Asia in human migration, its discussion in the context of the emergence and dispersal of modern humans has been rare. Emergence and Diversity of Modern Human Behavior in Paleolithic Asia focuses long-overdue scholarly attention on this under-studied area of the world. Arising from a 2011 symposium sponsored by the National Museum of Nature and Science in Tokyo, this book gathers the work of archaeologists from the Pacific Rim of Asia, Australia, and North America, to address the relative lack of attention given to the emergence of modern human behavior as manifested in Asia during the worldwide dispersal from Africa.
Posted in Social Science

The Origins of Modern Humans

A World Survey of the Fossil Evidence

Author: Fred H. Smith,Frank Spencer

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780845102336

Category: Human evolution

Page: 590

View: 2190

Chapter on Australasia separately annotated; see Wolpoff, M.H. and others.
Posted in Human evolution

Animal Teeth and Human Tools

A Taphonomic Odyssey in Ice Age Siberia

Author: Christy G. Turner II,Nicolai D. Ovodov,Olga V. Pavlova

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107067650

Category: Social Science

Page: N.A

View: 4273

The culmination of more than a decade of fieldwork and related study, this unique book uses analyses of perimortem taphonomy in Ice Age Siberia to propose a new hypothesis for the peopling of the New World. The authors present evidence based on examinations of more than 9000 pieces of human and carnivore bone from 30 late Pleistocene archaeological and palaeontological sites, including cave and open locations, which span more than 2000 miles from the Ob River in the West to the Sea of Japan in the East. The observed bone damage signatures suggest that the conventional prehistory of Siberia needs revision and, in particular, that cave hyenas had a significant influence on the lives of Ice Age Siberians. The findings are supported by more than 250 photographs, which illustrate the bone damage described and provide a valuable insight into the context and landscape of the fieldwork for those unfamiliar with Siberia.
Posted in Social Science

Handbook of South American Archaeology

Author: Helaine Silverman,William Isbell

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9780387752280

Category: Social Science

Page: 1192

View: 9827

Perhaps the contributions of South American archaeology to the larger field of world archaeology have been inadequately recognized. If so, this is probably because there have been relatively few archaeologists working in South America outside of Peru and recent advances in knowledge in other parts of the continent are only beginning to enter larger archaeological discourse. Many ideas of and about South American archaeology held by scholars from outside the area are going to change irrevocably with the appearance of the present volume. Not only does the Handbook of South American Archaeology (HSAA) provide immense and broad information about ancient South America, the volume also showcases the contributions made by South Americans to social theory. Moreover, one of the merits of this volume is that about half the authors (30) are South Americans, and the bibliographies in their chapters will be especially useful guides to Spanish and Portuguese literature as well as to the latest research. It is inevitable that the HSAA will be compared with the multi-volume Handbook of South American Indians (HSAI), with its detailed descriptions of indigenous peoples of South America, that was organized and edited by Julian Steward. Although there are heroic archaeological essays in the HSAI, by the likes of Junius Bird, Gordon Willey, John Rowe, and John Murra, Steward states frankly in his introduction to Volume Two that “arch- ology is included by way of background” to the ethnographic chapters.
Posted in Social Science

Handbook of North American Indians

Environment, origins, and population

Author: Douglas H. Ubelaker,William C. Sturtevant

Publisher: US Government Printing Office

ISBN: 9780160775116

Category: History

Page: 1156

View: 8417

Encyclopedic summary of prehistory, history, cultures and political and social aspects of native peoples in Siberia, Alaska, the Canadian Arctic and Greenland.
Posted in History

Archaeology in Latin America

Author: Benjamin Alberti,Gustavo G. Politis

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134597835

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 9732

This pioneering and comprehensive survey is the first overview of current themes in Latin American archaeology written solely by academics native to the region, and it makes their collected expertise available to an English-speaking audience for the first time. The contributors cover the most significant issues in the archaeology of Latin America, such as the domestication of camelids, the emergence of urban society in Mesoamerica, the frontier of the Inca empire, and the relatively little known archaeology of the Amazon basin. This book draws together key areas of research in Latin American archaeological thought into a coherent whole; no other volume on this area has ever dealt with such a diverse range of subjects, and some of the countries examined have never before been the subject of a regional study.
Posted in Social Science

The Chinchorro culture

a comparative perspective, the archaeology of the earliest human mummification

Author: Sanz, Nuria,Arriaza, Bernardo T.,Standen, Vivien G.

Publisher: UNESCO Publishing

ISBN: 9231000209

Category:

Page: 202

View: 6143

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