Jamestown, the Truth Revealed

Author: William M. Kelso

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 0813939941

Category: Social Science

Page: 296

View: 2264

What was life really like for the band of adventurers who first set foot on the banks of the James River in 1607? Important as the accomplishments of these men and women were, the written records pertaining to them are scarce, ambiguous, and often conflicting. In Jamestown, the Truth Revealed, William Kelso takes us literally to the soil where the Jamestown colony began, unearthing footprints of a series of structures, beginning with the James Fort, to reveal fascinating evidence of the lives and deaths of the first settlers, of their endeavors and struggles, and new insight into their relationships with the Virginia Indians. He offers up a lively but fact-based account, framed around a narrative of the archaeological team's exciting discoveries. Unpersuaded by the common assumption that James Fort had long ago been washed away by the James River, William Kelso and his collaborators estimated the likely site for the fort and began to unearth its extensive remains, including palisade walls, bulwarks, interior buildings, a well, a warehouse, and several pits. By Jamestown’s quadricentennial over 2 million objects were cataloged, more than half dating to the time of Queen Elizabeth and King James. Kelso’s work has continued with recent excavations of numerous additional buildings, including the settlement’s first church, which served as the burial place of four Jamestown leaders, the governor’s rowhouse during the term of Samuel Argall, and substantial dump sites, which are troves for archaeologists. He also recounts how researchers confirmed the practice of survival cannibalism in the colony following the recovery from an abandoned cellar bakery of the cleaver-scarred remains of a young English girl. CT scanning and computer graphics have even allowed researchers to put a face on this victim of the brutal winter of 1609–10, a period that has come to be known as the "starving time." Refuting the now decades-old stereotype that attributed the high mortality rate of the Jamestown settlers to their laziness and ineptitude, Jamestown, the Truth Revealed produces a vivid picture of the settlement that is far more complex, incorporating the most recent archaeology and using twenty-first-century technology to give Jamestown its rightful place in history, thereby contributing to a broader understanding of the transatlantic world.
Posted in Social Science

Jamestown, the Buried Truth

Author: William M. Kelso

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780813927701

Category: History

Page: 238

View: 908

What was life really like for the band of adventurers who first set foot on the banks of the James River in 1607? Important as the accomplishments of these men and women were, the written records pertaining to them are scarce, ambiguous, and often conflicting, and those curious about the birthplace of the United States are left to turn to dramatic and often highly fictionalized reports. In Jamestown, the Buried Truth, William Kelso takes us literally to the soil where the Jamestown colony began, unearthing the James Fort and its contents to reveal fascinating evidence of the lives and deaths of the first settlers, of their endeavors and struggles, and of their relationships with the Virginia Indians. He offers up a lively but fact-based account, framed around a narrative of the archaeological team's exciting discoveries. Once thought to have been washed away by the James River, James Fort still retains much of its structure, including palisade walls, bulwarks, interior buildings, a well, a warehouse, and several pits, and more than 500,000 objects have been cataloged, half dating to the time of Queen Elizabeth and King James. Artifacts especially reflective of life at James Fort include an ivory compass, Cabasset helmets and breastplates, glass and copper beads and ornaments, ceramics, tools, religious icons, a pewter flagon, and personal items. Dr. Kelso and his team of archaeologists have discovered the lost burial of one of Jamestown's early leaders, presumed to be Captain Bartholomew Gosnold, and the remains of several other early settlers, including a young man who died of a musket ball wound. In addition, they've uncovered and analyzed the remains of the foundations of Jamestown's massive capitol building. Refuting the now decades-old stereotype that attributed the high mortality rate of the Jamestown settlers to their laziness and ineptitude, Jamestown, the Buried Truth produces a vivid picture of the settlement that is far more complex, incorporating the most recent archaeology to give Jamestown its rightful place in history and thus contributing to a broader understanding of the transatlantic world.
Posted in History

Love and Hate in Jamestown

John Smith, Pocahontas, and the Start of a New Nation

Author: David A. Price

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 030742670X

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 8796

A New York Times Notable Book and aSan Jose Mercury News Top 20 Nonfiction Book of 2003In 1606, approximately 105 British colonists sailed to America, seeking gold and a trade route to the Pacific. Instead, they found disease, hunger, and hostile natives. Ill prepared for such hardship, the men responded with incompetence and infighting; only the leadership of Captain John Smith averted doom for the first permanent English settlement in the New World.The Jamestown colony is one of the great survival stories of American history, and this book brings it fully to life for the first time. Drawing on extensive original documents, David A. Price paints intimate portraits of the major figures from the formidable monarch Chief Powhatan, to the resourceful but unpopular leader John Smith, to the spirited Pocahontas, who twice saved Smith’s life. He also gives a rare balanced view of relations between the settlers and the natives and debunks popular myths about the colony. This is a superb work of history, reminding us of the horrors and heroism that marked the dawning of our nation. From the Trade Paperback edition.
Posted in History

A Land As God Made It

Jamestown and the Birth of America

Author: James Horn

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0786721987

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 8180

Jamestown -the first permanent English settlement in North America, after the disappearance of the Roanoke colony-is often given short shrift in histories of America. Founded thirteen years before the Mayflower landed, Jamestown occupies less space in our cultural memory than the Pilgrims of Plymouth. But as historian James Horn points out, many of the key tensions of Jamestown's early years became central to American history, for good and for ill: Jamestown introduced slavery into English-speaking North America; it became the first of England's colonies to adopt a representative government; and, it was the site of the first clashes between whites and Indians over territorial expansion. Jamestown began the tenuous, often violent, mingling of different peoples that came to embody the American experience. A Land as God Made It puts the Jamestown experience in the context of European geopolitics, giving prominence to the Spanish threat to extinguish the colony at the earliest opportunity. Jamestown-unlike Plymouth or Massachusetts-was England's bid to establish an empire to challenge the Spanish. With unparalleled knowledge of Jamestown's role in early American history, James Horn has written the definitive account of the colony that gave rise to America.
Posted in History

First People

The Early Indians of Virginia

Author: Keith Egloff,Deborah B. Woodward

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 9780813925486

Category: History

Page: 96

View: 5043

Incorporating recent events in the Native American community as well as additional information gleaned from publications and public resources, this newly redesigned and updated second edition of First People brings back to the fore this concise and highly readable narrative. Full of stories that represent the full diversity of Virginia’s Indians, past and present, this popular book remains the essential introduction to the history of Virginia Indians from the earlier times to the present day.
Posted in History

A Passion for the Past

The Odyssey of a Transatlantic Archaeologist

Author: Ivor Noël Hume

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 0813929962

Category: Social Science

Page: 384

View: 6121

Ivor Noël Hume has devoted his life to uncovering countless lives that came before him. In A Passion for the Past the world-renowned archaeologist turns to his own life, sharing with the reader a story that begins amid the bombed-out rubble of post–World War II London and ends on North Carolina’s Roanoke Island, where the history of British America began. Weaving the personal with the professional, this is the chronicle of an extraordinary life steered by coincidence scarcely believable even as fiction. Born into the good life of pre-Depression England, Noël Hume was a child of the 1930s who had his silver spoon abruptly snatched away when the war began. By its end he was enduring a period of Dickensian poverty and clinging to aspirations of becoming a playwright. Instead, he found himself collecting antiquities from the shore of the river Thames and, stumbling upon this new passion, becoming an "accidental" archaeologist. From those beginnings emerged a career that led Noël Hume into the depths of Roman London and, later, to Virginia’s Colonial Williamsburg, where for thirty-five years he directed its department of archaeology. His discovery of nearby Martin’s Hundred and its massacred inhabitants is perhaps Noël Hume’s best-known achievement, but as these chapters relate, it was hardly his last, his pursuit of the past taking him to such exotic destinations as Egypt, Jamaica, Haiti, and to shipwrecks in Bermuda. When the author began his career, historical archaeology did not exist as an academic discipline. It fell to Noël Hume’s books, lectures, and television presentations to help bring it to the forefront of his profession, where it stands today. This story of a life, and a career, unlike any other reveals to us how the previously unimagined can come to seem beautifully inevitable.
Posted in Social Science

The Man Who Foiled a Jamestown Massacre

The Life and Times of Richard Pace of Pace's Paines

Author: David Edmund Pace

Publisher: Paragon Publishing

ISBN: 1782224815

Category: History

Page: 182

View: 343

In the beginning was Jamestown... This is the wondrous story of the genesis of America told through this cradle to the grave account of the life of one man. Richard Pace was a simple London carpenter who became an Ancient Planter - a name given to the earliest colonial settlers. It was his timely warning of an impending attack that saved the first permanent settlement in Virginia from annihilation. Richard’s heroic act had profound consequences: If the Powhatan Confederacy had wiped out James Fort then they would have been able to pick off the outlying plantations at their leisure. The Jamestown Settlement would be but a footnote in history. Failure meant that the Confederacy had effectively signed its own death warrant. The fate intended for the interloping white man was visited on the attackers. In the years to follow the native tribes would suffer subjugation, marginalisation, and be pressed from their tribal lands. The settlers were able to secure undisputed occupation and control of the territory. Virginia prospered under a system that encouraged enterprise balanced by institutions which ensured the rule of law and participative governance. The colony organised round this combination of individualism, free markets and democracy, presaged what America would become.
Posted in History

Flowerdew Hundred

The Archaeology of a Virginia Plantation, 1619-1864

Author: James Deetz

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 9780813916392

Category: History

Page: 204

View: 5947

Deetz’s Flowerdew Hundred is a synopsis of the result of twenty-five years of archaeological investigations at Flowerdew Hundred, a former plantation on the south side of the James River in Prince George County, Virginia. Throughout the work, Deetz conveys the importance of combining historiography and archaeology to a reach a better understanding of the past. This multidirectional approach is displayed as Deetz examines smoking-pipe stems, Colono-ware pottery, and post-in-ground buildings at Flowerdew. Through examining regional history of the Chesapeake, comparing the Flowerdew archaeological record with that along the eastern seaboard (particularly in regards to icehouses and pits), and looking at the architecture of Salem, South Africa, Deetz is able to construct a contextual history of Flowerdew in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. For archaeologists, amateurs, and the general public, the book simplistically relays the intertwining of history, archaeology and folk studies and, of course, reveals a glimpse into life on a Virginia plantation.
Posted in History

True Story of Pocahontas

The Other Side of History

Author: Dr. Linwood "Little Bear" Custalow

Publisher: Fulcrum Publishing

ISBN: 1555918670

Category: History

Page: 168

View: 1659

The True Story of Pocahontas is the first public publication of the Powhatan perspective that has been maintained and passed down from generation to generation within the Mattaponi Tribe, and the first written history of Pocahontas by her own people.
Posted in History

The Jamestown Experiment

The Remarkable Story of the Enterprising Colony and the Unexpected Results That Shaped America

Author: Tony Williams

Publisher: Sourcebooks Incorporated

ISBN: 9781402243530

Category: History

Page: 302

View: 2497

Describes the history of the Jamestown colony in Virginia in the early seventeenth century, including the colonists' relationship with the local Native Americans, the struggle to thrive in a new land, and its legacy.
Posted in History

The Law School at the University of Virginia

Architectural Expansion in the Realm of Thomas Jefferson

Author: Philip Mills Herrington

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 0813939461

Category: Architecture

Page: 280

View: 843

As a UNESCO World Heritage Site and a masterwork of Thomas Jefferson, the "Academical Village" at the heart of the University of Virginia has long attracted the attention of visitors and scholars alike. Yet today Jefferson’s original structures make up only a small fraction of a campus comprising over 1,600 acres. The Law School at the University of Virginia traces the history of one of the eight original schools of the University to study the development of the University Grounds over nearly two hundred years. In this book, Philip Mills Herrington relates the remarkable story of how the Law School and the University have used architecture to reconcile a desire for progress with a veneration for the past. In addition to providing a fascinating history of one of the oldest and most influential law schools in the United States, Herrington offers a valuable case study of the ways in which American universities have constructed, altered, and enhanced the built environment in response to the ever-changing demands of higher education and campus life.
Posted in Architecture

Archaeology at Monticello

Artifacts of Everyday Life in the Plantation Community

Author: William M. Kelso

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 9781882886050

Category: Social Science

Page: 134

View: 9224

In telling the story of Thomas Jefferson, the grounds at Monticello, and the many people, enslaved and free, who worked on the plantation, William Kelso's landmark work augments the written record of life there. Archeological excavations show that many of Jefferson's idealized projects were realized in very different form. In particular, the book contains significant new information about Mulberry Row, a line of workshops and dwellings where most of the plantation's industries were located. The wealth of material objects that Kelso's team unearthed form a fascinating and palpable link to the past.
Posted in Social Science

How We'll Live on Mars

Author: Stephen Petranek

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1476784779

Category: Science

Page: 96

View: 5473

Award-winning journalist Stephen Petranek says humans will live on Mars by 2027. Now he makes the case that living on Mars is not just plausible, but inevitable. It sounds like science fiction, but Stephen Petranek considers it fact: Within twenty years, humans will live on Mars. We’ll need to. In this sweeping, provocative book that mixes business, science, and human reporting, Petranek makes the case that living on Mars is an essential back-up plan for humanity and explains in fascinating detail just how it will happen. The race is on. Private companies, driven by iconoclastic entrepreneurs, such as Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos, Paul Allen, and Sir Richard Branson; Dutch reality show and space mission Mars One; NASA; and the Chinese government are among the many groups competing to plant the first stake on Mars and open the door for human habitation. Why go to Mars? Life on Mars has potential life-saving possibilities for everyone on earth. Depleting water supplies, overwhelming climate change, and a host of other disasters—from terrorist attacks to meteor strikes—all loom large. We must become a space-faring species to survive. We have the technology not only to get humans to Mars, but to convert Mars into another habitable planet. It will likely take 300 years to “terraform” Mars, as the jargon goes, but we can turn it into a veritable second Garden of Eden. And we can live there, in specially designed habitations, within the next twenty years. In this exciting chronicle, Petranek introduces the circus of lively characters all engaged in a dramatic effort to be the first to settle the Red Planet. How We’ll Live on Mars brings firsthand reporting, interviews with key participants, and extensive research to bear on the question of how we can expect to see life on Mars within the next twenty years.
Posted in Science

The Jamestown Adventure

Accounts of the Virginia Colony, 1605-1614

Author: Ed Southern

Publisher: John F. Blair, Publisher

ISBN: 9780895873026

Category: History

Page: 253

View: 8309

Using first-person documents, these narratives tell the story of the founding of Jamestown from 1605-1614.
Posted in History

Written in Bone

Buried Lives of Jamestown and Colonial Maryland

Author: Sally M. Walker

Publisher: Carolrhoda Books

ISBN: 1467737313

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 144

View: 9376

Bright white teeth. Straight leg bones. Awkwardly contorted arm bones. On a hot summer day in 2005, Dr. Douglas Owsley of the Smithsonian Institution peered into an excavated grave, carefully examining the fragile skeleton that had been buried there for four hundred years. "He was about fifteen years old when he died. And he was European," Owsley concluded. But how did he know? Just as forensic scientists use their knowledge of human remains to help solve crimes, they use similar skills to solve the mysteries of the long-ago past. Join author Sally M. Walker as she works alongside the scientists investigating colonial-era graves near Jamestown, Virginia, as well as other sites in Maryland. As you follow their investigations, she'll introduce you to what scientists believe are the lives of a teenage boy, a ship's captain, an indentured servant, a colonial official and his family, and an enslaved African girl. All are reaching beyond the grave to tell us their stories, which are written in bone.
Posted in Juvenile Nonfiction

Blood on the River

James Town 1607

Author: Elisa Carbone

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9780142409329

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 237

View: 8087

Traveling to the New World in 1606 as the page to Captain John Smith, twelve-year-old orphan Samuel Collier settles in the new colony of James Town, where he must quickly learn to distinguish between friend and foe. Reprint.
Posted in Juvenile Fiction

Powhatan Indian Place Names in Tidewater Virginia

Author: Martha W. McCartney,Helen C. Rountree

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780806320625

Category: History

Page: 148

View: 9020

Gives variations of historic Indian place names under their most common spelling or modern equivalent. The information was drawn from land patents, government records, public and private archives, and collections of historical maps, enabling researchers to see how Indian place names changed over time and how they correspond to the modern landscape.
Posted in History