International Migration and Development in the Americas

Symposium on International Migration in the Americas, San José, Costa Rica, September 2000

Author: CELADE (Organization). División de Población

Publisher: United Nations Publications

ISBN: 9789211213287

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 512

View: 4173

This publication contains the presentations, comments, conclusions and final panel review of the Symposium on International Migration in the Americas, held in September 2000. This book is structured to match the five broad topics into which the sessions were divided: (i) Migratory trends and patterns in the Americas; (ii) Relations between migration and development; (iii) Governance of migration and multilateral diplomacy; (iv) Economic and social importance of migration; and (v) Human rights of migrants. The final panel review reflects the most important aspects of the symposium and concludes that holding such an event heralds major progress in addressing the many issues raised by international migration in the Americas.
Posted in Business & Economics

Continental Divides: International Migration in the Americas

Author: Katharine M. Donato

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 1412991862

Category: Social Science

Page: 324

View: 3184

Since Mexico-U.S. migration represents the largest sustained migratory flow between two nations worldwide, much of the theoretical and empirical work on migration has focused on this single case. In the last few decades, however, migration has emerged as a critical issue across all nations in Latin America and the Caribbean, with the region seeing its position changed from a net migrant-receiving region to one that now stands as one of the foremost sending areas of the world. In this latest volume of the ANNALS, leading migration scholars seek to redress the imbalance offered when only studying a single case with the first systematic assessment of Latin American migration patterns using ongoing research on the Mexican case as a basis for comparison. Each chapter examines specific propositions or findings derived from the Mexican case that have not yet been tested for other Latin American or Caribbean nations. Using a common framework of data, methods, and theories, they offer a new perspective on the causes and consequences of migration in the Western Hemisphere.
Posted in Social Science

Free Markets, Open Societies, Closed Borders?

Trends in International Migration and Immigration Policy in the Americas

Author: Max J. Castro

Publisher: University of Miami North South Center Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: Political Science

Page: 284

View: 1678

Latin American and Caribbean immigration into the USA now accounts for half of all immigrants entering the country. In this volume, contributors analyze the tightening immigration policies in the USA and Canada alongside their promotion of free trade and hemispheric integration.
Posted in Political Science

International Migration and Development in East Asia and the Pacific

Author: Ahmad Ahsan,Manolo Abella,Andrew Beath,Yukon Huang,Trang Van Nguyen

Publisher: World Bank Publications

ISBN: 0821399578

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 244

View: 3735

The East Asia and Pacific (EAP) region has an international emigrant population of more than 21 million people who remitted US$112 billion to their home countries in 2013. The region also hosts more than 7 million migrant workers, mostly from other Asian countries. These migrant workers account for 20 percent or more of the labor force in economies such as Malaysia and Singapore and thus play a significant role in the economies of the labor-receiving countries. An aging population in many East Asian countries will create significant labor shortages, leading to greater demand for migrant workers. For these reasons, international labor mobility is emerging as an important development issue in East Asia, with important implications for reducing poverty and supporting sustainable economic development in the region. In this context, International Migration and Development in East Asia and the Pacific analyzes the impact of migration on development of the EAP region and examines how international migration should be managed in East Asia in a way that supports development goals while simultaneously protecting the rights of migrants. The study covers trends in international migration in East Asia and overarching regional issues such as the links between macroeconomic management and remittances and the role of demographic trends in migration; the economic impact of migration and remittances on labor-sending countries and labor-receiving countries; the migration industry; and the policies and institutions that govern migration. This report shows that in labor-sending countries remittances help reduce poverty significantly by increasing income for migrants’ families. At the country level, remittances have a significant role in helping finance trade deficits and in bolstering reserves, not only in the small Pacific Island economies but also in large economies such as Vietnam and the Philippines. For labor-receiving countries, such as Malaysia, Singapore, and Hong Kong SAR, China, migrant workers form a significant part of the workforce, especially in labor-intensive manufacturing, construction, plantation agriculture, fishing, and household services. Migrant workers thus help relieve labor shortages, boost output, and maintain competitiveness. The role of migrant workers will become more important in the future given the rapid population aging in many labor-receiving East Asian countries. Given these factors, the key question concerning international migration in East Asia and the Pacific is not whether it is desirable but how it should be managed in the future. International Migration and Development in East Asia and the Pacific discusses a range of policy options in both labor-sending and labor-receiving countries to address this question.
Posted in Business & Economics

Remittances and Development

Lessons from Latin America

Author: Pablo Fajnzylber,J. Humberto Lopez

Publisher: World Bank Publications

ISBN: 9780821368718

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 408

View: 1479

Workers' remittances have become a major source of financing for developing countries and are especially important in Latin America and the Caribbean, which is at the top of the ranking of remittance receiving regions in the world. While there has been a recent surge in analytical work on the topic, this book is motivated by the large heterogeneity in migration and remittance patterns across countries and regions, and by the fact that existing evidence for Latin America and the Caribbean is restricted to only a few countries, such as Mexico and El Salvador. Because the nature of the phenomenon varies across countries, its development impact and policy implications are also likely to differ in ways that are still largely unknown. This book helps fill the gap by exploring, in the specific context of Latin America and Caribbean countries, some of the main questions faced by policymakers when trying to respond to increasing remittances flows. The book relies on cross-country panel data and household surveys for 11 Latin American countries to explore the development impact of remittance flows along several dimensions: growth, poverty, inequality, schooling, health, labor supply, financial development, and real exchange rates.
Posted in Business & Economics

International Migration in Cuba

Accumulation, Imperial Designs, and Transnational Social Fields

Author: Margarita Cervantes-Rodriguez,Alejandro Portes

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN: 0271035390

Category: Social Science

Page: 323

View: 6262

"Examines the impact of international migration on the society and culture of Cuba since the colonial period"--Provided by publisher.
Posted in Social Science

International Migration

Prospects and Policies in a Global Market

Author: Douglas S. Massey,J. Edward Taylor

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780199269006

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 394

View: 4200

In 'International Migration' a multinational, multi-disciplinary group of scholars offer a comprehensive, up-to-date survey of global patterns of international migration which shows that the phenomenon is rooted in the expansion and consolidation of global markets rather than poverty or population growth.
Posted in Business & Economics

The Handbook of International Migration

The American Experience

Author: Charles Hirschman,Philip Kasinitz,Josh Dewind

Publisher: Russell Sage Foundation

ISBN: 161044289X

Category: Social Science

Page: 520

View: 4066

The historic rise in international migration over the past thirty years has brought a tide of new immigrants to the United States from Asia, South America, and other parts of the globe. Their arrival has reverberated throughout American society, prompting an outpouring of scholarship on the causes and consequences of the new migrations. The Handbook of International Migration gathers the best of this scholarship in one volume to present a comprehensive overview of the state of immigration research in this country, bringing coherence and fresh insight to this fast growing field. The contributors to The Handbook of International Migration—a virtual who's who of immigration scholars—draw upon the best social science theory and demographic research to examine the effects and implications of immigration in the United States. The dramatic shift in the national background of today's immigrants away from primarily European roots has led many researchers to rethink traditional theories of assimilation,and has called into question the usefulness of making historical comparisons between today's immigrants and those of previous generations. Part I of the Handbook examines current theories of international migration, including the forces that motivate people to migrate, often at great financial and personal cost. Part II focuses on how immigrants are changed after their arrival, addressing such issues as adaptation, assimilation, pluralism, and socioeconomic mobility. Finally, Part III looks at the social, economic, and political effects of the surge of new immigrants on American society. Here the Handbook explores how the complex politics of immigration have become intertwined with economic perceptions and realities, racial and ethnic divisions,and international relations. A landmark compendium of richly nuanced investigations, The Handbook of International Migration will be the major reference work on recent immigration to this country and will enhance the development of a truly interdisciplinary field of international migration studies.
Posted in Social Science

International Migration and Development in Eastern and Southern Africa

Author: Bariagaber, Assefaw

Publisher: OSSREA

ISBN: 9994455761

Category: Social Science

Page: 274

View: 5214

The impact of international migration, both South-South as well as South-North, on the economic, social and political life of the people in Eastern and Southern Africa [was] not well documented and studied,- and 'the evidence-base for policy on migration and development [was] very weak.' With this in mind, OSSREA's invitation to conduct a study on international migration in Africa had the following objectives: To analyze the nature and type of South-South migration, focusing on issues, such as brain gain and/or brain drain, remittance flows, technical know-how transfers, violations of the right of African migrants and gender dimensions of migration; To investigate the dynamics of migration from Eastern and Southern Africa to the Arab Gulf States as well as to developed countries, focusing on the skills of migrants, brain gain and/or drain, remittance flows, technical know-how transfers, violations of the rights of African migrants and gender dimension of migrants; and to assess the successes, impediments and challenges of African international migrants from Eastern and Southern Africa and to formulate policy recommendations to maximize the gains and minimize the costs associated with international migration in Africa.
Posted in Social Science

International Migration and the Global Community

A Forum on the Report of the Global Commission on International Migration

Author: Joseph Chamie,Mary G. Powers

Publisher: Hammersmith Press

ISBN: 1577030478

Category: Political Science

Page: 137

View: 2114

Posted in Political Science

Continental Divides: International Migration in the Americas

Author: Katharine M. Donato

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 1412991862

Category: Social Science

Page: 324

View: 7851

Since Mexico-U.S. migration represents the largest sustained migratory flow between two nations worldwide, much of the theoretical and empirical work on migration has focused on this single case. In the last few decades, however, migration has emerged as a critical issue across all nations in Latin America and the Caribbean, with the region seeing its position changed from a net migrant-receiving region to one that now stands as one of the foremost sending areas of the world. In this latest volume of the ANNALS, leading migration scholars seek to redress the imbalance offered when only studying a single case with the first systematic assessment of Latin American migration patterns using ongoing research on the Mexican case as a basis for comparison. Each chapter examines specific propositions or findings derived from the Mexican case that have not yet been tested for other Latin American or Caribbean nations. Using a common framework of data, methods, and theories, they offer a new perspective on the causes and consequences of migration in the Western Hemisphere.
Posted in Social Science

Ellis Island Nation

Immigration Policy and American Identity in the Twentieth Century

Author: Robert L. Fleegler

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812208099

Category: History

Page: 280

View: 5737

Though debates over immigration have waxed and waned in the course of American history, the importance of immigrants to the nation's identity is imparted in civics classes, political discourse, and television and film. We are told that the United States is a "nation of immigrants," built by people who came from many lands to make an even better nation. But this belief was relatively new in the twentieth century, a period that saw the establishment of immigrant quotas that endured until the Immigrant and Nationality Act of 1965. What changed over the course of the century, according to historian Robert L. Fleegler, is the rise of "contributionism," the belief that the newcomers from eastern and southern Europe contributed important cultural and economic benefits to American society. Early twentieth-century immigrants from southern and eastern Europe often found themselves criticized for language and customs at odds with their new culture, but initially found greater acceptance through an emphasis on their similarities to "native stock" Americans. Drawing on sources as diverse as World War II films, records of Senate subcommittee hearings, and anti-Communist propaganda, Ellis Island Nation describes how contributionism eventually shifted the focus of the immigration debate from assimilation to a Cold War celebration of ethnic diversity and its benefits—helping to ease the passage of 1960s immigration laws that expanded the pool of legal immigrants and setting the stage for the identity politics of the 1970s and 1980s. Ellis Island Nation provides a historical perspective on recent discussions of multiculturalism and the exclusion of groups that have arrived since the liberalization of immigrant laws.
Posted in History

The Millennium Development Goals and Migration

Author: N.A

Publisher: United Nations Publications

ISBN: 9789211036381

Category: Social Science

Page: 38

View: 4528

This paper discusses the linkages between migration and the Millennium Development Goals, with specific focus on poverty alleviation, gender, health, environmental sustainability and global partnerships. It argues that, if properly engaged, migrants can be a supporting factor towards the achievement of MDG targets. Governments, development agencies and international organizations should develop strategies to enhance the positive impact of migration on the achievement of the MDGs. Where there are likely to be negative effects the international community needs to develop migration management to help. Above all, the complex relationship between migration and the MDGs must be explored further and more research is needed.
Posted in Social Science

The Palgrave Handbook of International Labour Migration

Law and Policy Perspectives

Author: M. Panizzon,G. Zurcher,E. Fornalé,Gottfried Zürcher

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137352213

Category: Social Science

Page: 613

View: 6381

This Handbook focuses on the complexity surrounding the interaction between trade, labour mobility and development, taking into consideration social, economic and human rights implications, and identifies mechanisms for lawful movements across borders and their practical implementation.
Posted in Social Science

Development Cycles, Political Regimes and International Migration

Argentina in the Twentieth Century

Author: Andrés Solimano,United Nations. Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean. Economic Development Division

Publisher: United Nations Publications

ISBN: 9789211213904

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 46

View: 4059

This publication examines the main patterns and determinants of international migration to and from Argentina during the twentieth century, and the economic and political factors affecting migration flows. It assesses the effects of relative income differentials, persistence effects, economic cycles and political regimes on net migration to develop a net migration model for Argentina based on econometric estimates.
Posted in Business & Economics

Indian Skilled Migration and Development

To Europe and Back

Author: Gabriela Tejada,Uttam Bhattacharya,Binod Khadria,Christiane Kuptsch

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 8132218108

Category: Social Science

Page: 332

View: 1741

This edited contribution explores strategies and measures for leveraging the potential of skilled diasporas and for advancing knowledge-based evidence on return skilled migration and its impact on development. By taking the example of Indian skilled migration, this study identifies ways of involving returned skilled migrants in home country development as well as proposes approaches to engage the diaspora in development. As high-skill immigration from India to mainland Europe is a rather recent phenomenon, the activities of Indian professionals in Europe are under-researched. The findings have wider application in contributing to the policy dialogue on migration and development, specifically to the advantage for developing and emerging economies. The book employs an interdisciplinary, two-fold approach: The first part of the research looks at how international exposure affects the current situation of skilled returnees in India. The second, European, part of the research examines migration policies, labour market regulations and other institutional settings that enable or hinder skilled Indians’ links with the country of origin. Structural differences between the host countries may facilitate different levels of learning opportunities; thus, this book identifies good practices to promote the involvement of Indian skilled diaspora in socio-economic development. In applying the framework of diaspora contributions as well as the return channel to study the impact on India, the book draws on qualitative and quantitative research methods consisting of policy analysis, in-depth interviews with key experts and skilled migrants and on data sets collected specifically for this study.
Posted in Social Science

International Migration

Evolving Trends from the Early Twentieth Century to the Present

Author: Susan F. Martin

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139952307

Category: Political Science

Page: N.A

View: 3037

States have long been wary of putting international migration on the global agenda. As an issue that defines sovereignty - that is, who enters and remains on a state's territory - international migration has called for protection of national prerogatives and unilateral actions. However, since the end of World War I, governments have sought ways to address various aspects of international migration in a collaborative manner. This book examines how these efforts to increase international cooperation have evolved from the early twentieth century to the present. The scope encompasses all of the components of international migration: labor migration, family reunification, refugees, human trafficking and smuggling, and newly emerging forms of displacement (including movements likely to result from global climate change). The final chapter assesses the progress (and lack thereof) in developing an international migration regime and makes recommendations towards strengthening international cooperation in this area.
Posted in Political Science

Regionalism, Development and the Post-Commodities Boom in South America

Author: Ernesto Vivares

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319625519

Category: Political Science

Page: 348

View: 2840

This book is a critical and multidisciplinary IPE of the unequal structures of South American development and uneven insertions in the global order following the decline of the commodities boom. The work explores the extent to which regional development issues are related to merely a decline of commodities ́ prices and/or to the resilience of the historical structures within an unequal world order. Thus, the authors seek first to analytically explore the regional issues beyond the formal limitations of North American and Eurocentric approaches. Secondly, they empirically scrutinize the complex dimensions of regional inequality and global insertions. Aspects analysed include economic reprimarization, the impact of China, development finance, trade and regional value chains, knowledge and technology, regional and transnational organised crime, cities, economic integration and the Global South.
Posted in Political Science

Handbook of the Economics of International Migration

Author: Barry Chiswick,Paul Miller

Publisher: Elsevier

ISBN: 044463388X

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 1702

View: 5224

The economic literature on international migration interests policymakers as well as academics throughout the social sciences. These volumes, the first of a new subseries in the Handbooks in Economics, describe and analyze scholarship created since the inception of serious attention began in the late 1970s. This literature appears in the general economics journals, in various field journals in economics (especially, but not exclusively, those covering labor market and human resource issues), in interdisciplinary immigration journals, and in papers by economists published in journals associated with history, sociology, political science, demography, and linguistics, among others. Covers a range of topics from labor market outcomes and fiscal consequences to the effects of international migration on the level and distribution of income – and everything in between. Encompasses a wide range of topics related to migration and is multidisciplinary in some aspects, which is crucial on the topic of migration Appeals to a large community of scholars interested in this topic and for whom no overviews or summaries exist
Posted in Business & Economics

Mobile Selves

Race, Migration, and Belonging in Peru and the U.S.

Author: Ulla D. Berg

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 1479803464

Category: Political Science

Page: 336

View: 2389

Mobile Selves illuminates how transnational communicative practices and forms of exchange produce new forms of kinship and social relations, as well as new forms of self-presentation and belonging for global labor migrants. It shows how migrants create new portrayals of themselves which work both to overcome the class and racial biases that they had faced in their home country, as well as to control the images they share of themselves with others back home. Migrant videos, for example, which document migrants' lives for family back home, are often sanitized to avoid causing worry.In this engaging volume Ulla D. Berg examines the conditions under which racialized Peruvians of rural and working-class origins leave the central highlands of Peru to migrate to the United States, how they fare, and what constrains their movement and their attempts to maintain meaningful social relations across borders. By exploring the ways in which migration is mediated between the Peruvian Andes and the United States—by documents, money, and images and objects in circulation—this book makes a major contribution to the documentation and theorization of the role of technology in fostering new forms of migrant sociality and subjectivity. In its focus on the forms of sociality and belonging that these mediations enable, the volume adds to key anthropological debates about affect, subjectivity, and sociality in today's mobile world. It also makes significant contributions to studies of inequality in Latin America, showcasing the intersection of transnational mobility with structures and processes of exclusion in both national and global contexts.
Posted in Political Science