Information and Empire

Mechanisms of Communication in Russia, 1600-1854

Author: Simon Franklin,Katherine Bowers

Publisher: Open Book Publishers

ISBN: 178374376X

Category: History

Page: 444

View: 6350

From the mid-sixteenth to the mid-nineteenth century Russia was transformed from a moderate-sized, land-locked principality into the largest empire on earth. How did systems of information and communication shape and reflect this extraordinary change? Information and Mechanisms of Communication in Russia, 1600-1850 brings together a range of contributions to shed some light on this complex question. Communication networks such as the postal service and the gathering and circulation of news are examined alongside the growth of a bureaucratic apparatus that informed the government about its country and its people. The inscription of space is considered from the point of view of mapping and the changing public ‘graphosphere’ of signs and monuments. More than a series of institutional histories, this book is concerned with the way Russia discovered itself, envisioned itself and represented itself to its people. Innovative and scholarly, this collection breaks new ground in its approach to communication and information as a field of study in Russia. More broadly, it is an accessible contribution to pre-modern information studies, taking as its basis a country whose history often serves to challenge habitual Western models of development. It is important reading not only for specialists in Russian Studies, but also for students and non-Russianists who are interested in the history of information and communications.
Posted in History

Information and Empire

Mechanisms of Communication in Russia, 1600-1854

Author: Professor of Slavonic Studies Simon Franklin,Katherine Bowers,Simon Franklin

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781783743742

Category: History

Page: 444

View: 5134

From the mid-sixteenth to the mid-nineteenth century Russia was transformed from a moderate-sized, land-locked principality into the largest empire on earth. How did systems of information and communication shape and reflect this extraordinary change? Information and Mechanisms of Communication in Russia, 1600-1850 brings together a range of contributions to shed some light on this complex question. Communication networks such as the postal service and the gathering and circulation of news are examined alongside the growth of a bureaucratic apparatus that informed the government about its country and its people. The inscription of space is considered from the point of view of mapping and the changing public 'graphosphere' of signs and monuments. More than a series of institutional histories, this book is concerned with the way Russia discovered itself, envisioned itself and represented itself to its people. Innovative and scholarly, this collection breaks new ground in its approach to communication and information as a field of study in Russia. More broadly, it is an accessible contribution to pre-modern information studies, taking as its basis a country whose history often serves to challenge habitual Western models of development. It is important reading not only for specialists in Russian Studies, but also for students and non-Russianists who are interested in the history of information and communications.
Posted in History

Slavery, Abolitionism and Empire in India, 1772-1843

Author: Andrea Major

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 1781388423

Category: History

Page: 361

View: 8481

'There are no two things in the world more different from each other than East-Indian and West Indian-slavery' (Robert Inglis, House of Commons Debate, 1833). In Slavery, Abolitionism and Empire in India, 1772-1843, Andrea Major asks why, at a time when East India Company expansion in India, British abolitionism and the missionary movement were all at their height, was the existence of slavery in India so often ignored, denied or excused? By exploring Britain's ambivalent relationship with both real and imagined slaveries in India, and the official, evangelical and popular discourses which surrounded them, she seeks to uncover the various political, economic and ideological agendas that allowed East Indian slavery to be represented as qualitatively different from it trans-Atlantic counterpart. In doing so, she uncovers tensions in the relationship between colonial policy and the so-called 'civilising mission', elucidating the intricate interactions between humanitarian movements, colonial ideologies and imperial imperatives in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century. The work draws on a range of sources from Britain and India to provide a trans-national perspective on this little known facet of the story of slavery and abolition in the British Empire, uncovering the complex ways in which Indian slavery was encountered, discussed, utilised, rationalised, and reconciled with the economic, political and moral imperatives of an empire whose focus was shifting to the East.
Posted in History

Emergence and Empire

Innis, Complexity, and the Trajectory of History

Author: John Bonnett

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN: 0773589112

Category: History

Page: 392

View: 9577

Harold Innis was one of the most profound thinkers that Canada ever produced. Such was his influence on the field of communication that Marshall McLuhan once declared his own work was a mere footnote to Innis. But over the past sixty years scholars have had a hard time explaining his brilliance, in large measure because Innis's dense, elliptical writing style has hindered easy explication and interpretation. But behind the dense verbiage lies a profound philosophy of history. In Emergence and Empire, John Bonnett offers a fresh take on Innis's work by demonstrating that his purpose was to understand the impact of self-organizing, emergent change on economies and societies. Innis's interest in emergent change induced him to craft an original and bold philosophy of history informed by concepts as diverse as information, Kantian idealism, and business cycle theory. Bonnett provides a close reading of Innis's oeuvre that connects works of communication and economic history to present a fuller understanding of Innis's influences and influence. Emergence and Empire presents a portrait of an original and prescient thinker who anticipated the importance of developments such as information visualization and whose understanding of change is remarkably similar to that which is promoted by the science of complexity today.
Posted in History

Civil Society and Empire

Ireland and Scotland in the Eighteenth-century Atlantic World

Author: James Livesey

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300155905

Category: HISTORY

Page: 305

View: 8875

Livesey traces the origins of the modern conceptions of civil society to Ireland & Scotland during the 18th century, arguing that it was invented as an idea of renewed community for provincial & defeated élites to allow them to enjoy liberty without participating in governance.
Posted in HISTORY

Tales of the Barbarians

Ethnography and Empire in the Roman West

Author: Greg Woolf

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781444390803

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 192

View: 2711

Tales of the Barbarians traces the creation of new mythologies in the wake of Roman expansion westward to the Atlantic, and offers the first application of modern ethnographic theory to ancient material. Investigates the connections between empire and knowledge at the turn of the millennia, and the creation of new histories in the Roman West Explores how ancient geography, local histories and the stories of wandering heroes were woven together by Greek scholars and local experts Offers a fresh perspective by examining passages from ancient writers in a new light
Posted in Literary Criticism

The Power of Knowledge

How Information and Technology Made the Modern World

Author: Jeremy Black

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 030019854X

Category: History

Page: 504

View: 1906

Information is power. For more than five hundred years the success or failure of nations has been determined by a country’s ability to acquire knowledge and technical skill and transform them into strength and prosperity. Leading historian Jeremy Black approaches global history from a distinctive perspective, focusing on the relationship between information and society and demonstrating how the understanding and use of information have been the primary factors in the development and character of the modern age. Black suggests that the West’s ascension was a direct result of its institutions and social practices for acquiring, employing, and retaining information and the technology that was ultimately produced. His cogent and well-reasoned analysis looks at cartography and the hardware of communication, armaments and sea power, mercantilism and imperialism, science and astronomy, as well as bureaucracy and the management of information, linking the history of technology with the history of global power while providing important indicators for the future of our world.
Posted in History

Information History in the Modern World

Histories of the Information Age

Author: Toni Weller

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN: 1137267259

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 3169

Information has a rich but under explored history. The information age of the late twentieth century witnessed the emergence of a new history of information and, in this timely collection of essays, a team of international scholars from a variety of disciplines examines the changing understandings of information in the modern world. Situating the concept of information in varying historical contexts since the eighteenth century, Information History in the Modern World: Histories of the Information Age: • explores how this historical research can challenge our perceptions of the information age in the global twenty-first century • discusses ephemera, wars, imagery, empire, identification and the transience of history in the digital era • argues that the changing uses, perceptions and manifestations of information helped to shape the world we know today. Authoritative and approachable, this is an invaluable resource for anyone who is interested in how and why information has become a distinguishing feature of the modern world.
Posted in History

Communication and Empire

Author: Dwayne R. Winseck,Robert M. Pike

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822389996

Category: History

Page: 456

View: 7837

Filling in a key chapter in communications history, Dwayne R. Winseck and Robert M. Pike offer an in-depth examination of the rise of the “global media” between 1860 and 1930. They analyze the connections between the development of a global communication infrastructure, the creation of national telegraph and wireless systems, and news agencies and the content they provided. Conventional histories suggest that the growth of global communications correlated with imperial expansion: an increasing number of cables were laid as colonial powers competed for control of resources. Winseck and Pike argue that the role of the imperial contest, while significant, has been exaggerated. They emphasize how much of the global media system was in place before the high tide of imperialism in the early twentieth century, and they point to other factors that drove the proliferation of global media links, including economic booms and busts, initial steps toward multilateralism and international law, and the formation of corporate cartels. Drawing on extensive research in corporate and government archives, Winseck and Pike illuminate the actions of companies and cartels during the late nineteenth century and early twentieth, in many different parts of the globe, including Africa, Asia, and Central and South America as well as Europe and North America. The complex history they relate shows how cable companies exploited or transcended national policies in the creation of the global cable network, how private corporations and government agencies interacted, and how individual reformers fought to eliminate cartels and harmonize the regulation of world communications. In Communication and Empire, the multinational conglomerates, regulations, and the politics of imperialism and anti-imperialism as well as the cries for reform of the late nineteenth century and early twentieth emerge as the obvious forerunners of today’s global media.
Posted in History

Race and Empire

Author: Jane Samson

Publisher: Pearson Education

ISBN: 9780582418370

Category: History

Page: 165

View: 1202

The relationship between racism and imperialism has inspired one of the most prominent debates in contemporary scholarship. The connection between race and empire resulted in some of the greatest atrocities in history and its legacy remains today. Race and Empire provides a chronological account and analysis of the contentious history of racial science and its connections with imperial expansion. Race and Empire also includes a selection of primary source documents, a Glossary of terms and a Who's Who of key figures, making it essential reading for students of world history, modern imperialism/colonialism and the history of anthropology.
Posted in History

Mercury, Mining, and Empire

The Human and Ecological Cost of Colonial Silver Mining in the Andes

Author: Nicholas A. Robins

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 0253005388

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 9496

On the basis of an examination of the colonial mercury and silver production processes and related labor systems, Mercury, Mining, and Empire explores the effects of mercury pollution in colonial Huancavelica, Peru, and Potosí, in present-day Bolivia. The book presents a multifaceted and interwoven tale of what colonial exploitation of indigenous peoples and resources left in its wake. It is a socio-ecological history that explores the toxic interrelationships between mercury and silver production, urban environments, and the people who lived and worked in them. Nicholas A. Robins tells the story of how native peoples in the region were conscripted into the noxious ranks of foot soldiers of proto-globalism, and how their fate, and that of their communities, was—and still is—chained to it.
Posted in History

Britain and Empire, 1880-1945

Author: Dane Kennedy

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317876237

Category: History

Page: 348

View: 6774

Britain and Empire, 1880-1945 traces the relationship between Britain and its empire during a period when the two spheres intersected with one another to an unprecedented degree. The story starts with the imperial expansion of the late nineteenth century and ends with the Second World War, at the end of which Britain was on the brink of decolonisation. The author shows how empire came to figure into almost every important development that marked Britain¿s response to the upheavals of the late nineteenth century and first half of the twentieth century. He examines its influence on foreign policy, party politics, social reforms, cultural practices, and national identity. At the same time, he shows how domestic developments affected imperial policies. Written in an engaging and accessible manner, this book: integrates British and imperial history in a single narrative provides a useful synthesis of recent historical research in the area analyses topics ranging from ideology and culture to politics and foreign affairs contains a chronology, glossary, who¿s who and guide to further reading Britain and Empire, 1880-1945 provides an up-to-date, accessible survey, ideal for students coming to the subject for the first time.
Posted in History

Ethnicity and Empire in Kenya

Loyalty and Martial Race among the Kamba, c.1800 to the Present

Author: Myles Osborne

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107061040

Category: History

Page: 300

View: 2627

This work analyses the ethnicity in Kenya over the past 200 years, focusing on the Kamba ethnic group that inhabits eastern Kenya.
Posted in History

The French Revolution and Empire

The Quest for a Civic Order

Author: Donald M. G. Sutherland

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 0470758260

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 1734

This book provides students and general readers with an introduction to revolutionary France whilst also presenting a clear argument to explain the events of the period. Provides students and general readers with an introduction to revolutionary France . Also presents a clear argument to explain the events of the period. Argues that the French Revolution encountered resistance from the poor as well as the privileged. Includes substantial discussion of society and government under Napoleon. Contextualizing material in each chapter aids students new to the topic.
Posted in History

Maritime Enterprise and Empire

Sir William Mackinnon and His Business Network, 1823-93

Author: J. Forbes Munro

Publisher: Boydell Press

ISBN: 9780851159355

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 525

View: 6564

The 19C roots of globalisation demonstrated through an account of the enterprise network created by the Scottish merchant, William Mackinnon. WINNER OF THE 2004 WADSWORTH PRIZE. WINNER OF THE 2004 SALTIRE SOCIETY RESEARCH BOOK OF THE YEAR AWARD.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

Law, Language, and Empire in the Roman Tradition

Author: Clifford Ando

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812204883

Category: History

Page: 184

View: 2920

The Romans depicted the civil law as a body of rules crafted through communal deliberation for the purpose of self-government. Yet, as Clifford Ando demonstrates in Law, Language, and Empire in the Roman Tradition, the civil law was also an instrument of empire: many of its most characteristic features developed in response to the challenges posed when the legal system of Rome was deployed to embrace, incorporate, and govern people and cultures far afield. Ando studies the processes through which lawyers at Rome grappled with the legal pluralism resulting from imperial conquests. He focuses primarily on the tools—most prominently analogy and fiction—used to extend the system and enable it to regulate the lives of persons far from the minds of the original legislators, and he traces the central place that philosophy of language came to occupy in Roman legal thought. In the second part of the book Ando examines the relationship between civil, public, and international law. Despite the prominence accorded public and international law in legal theory, it was civil law that provided conceptual resources to those other fields in the Roman tradition. Ultimately it was the civil law's implication in systems of domination outside its own narrow sphere that opened the door to its own subversion. When political turmoil at Rome upended the institutions of political and legislative authority and effectively ended Roman democracy, the concepts and language that the civil law supplied to the project of Republican empire saw their meanings transformed. As a result, forms of domination once exercised by Romans over others were inscribed in the workings of law at Rome, henceforth to be exercised by the Romans over themselves.
Posted in History

Tribes and Empire on the Margins of Nineteenth-Century Iran

Author: Arash Khazeni

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 0295800755

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 4758

Tribes and Empire on the Margins of Nineteenth-Century Iran traces the history of the Bakhtiyari tribal confederacy of the Zagros Mountains through momentous times that saw the opening of their territory to the outside world. As the Qajar dynasty sought to integrate the peoples on its margins into the state, the British Empire made commercial inroads into the once inaccessible mountains on the frontier between Iran and Iraq. The distance between the state and the tribes was narrowed through imperial projects that included the building of a road through the mountains, the gathering of geographical and ethnographic information, and the exploration for oil, which culminated during the Iranian Constitutional Revolution. These modern projects assimilated autonomous pastoral nomadic tribes on the peripheries of Qajar Iran into a wider imperial territory and the world economy. Tribal subjects did not remain passive amidst these changes in environment and society, however, and projects of empire in the hinterlands of Iran were always mediated through encounters, accommodation, and engagement with the tribes. In contrast to the range of literature on the urban classes and political center in Qajar Iran, Arash Khazeni adopts a view from the Bakhtiyari tents on the periphery. Drawing upon Persian chronicles, tribal histories, and archival sources from London, Tehran, and Isfahan, this book opens new ground by approaching nineteenth-century Iran from its edge and placing the tribal periphery at the heart of a tale about empire and assimilation in the modern Middle East.
Posted in History

Empire as the Triumph of Theory

Imperialism, Information, and the Colonial Society of 1868

Author: Edward Beasley

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780714656106

Category: History

Page: 216

View: 9561

A key addition to our understanding of the Victorian-era British Empire, this book looks at the founders of the Colonial Society and the ideas that led them down the path to imperialism.
Posted in History