If the Irish Ran the World

Montserrat, 1630-1730

Author: Donald H. Akenson

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN: 9780773516861

Category: History

Page: 273

View: 1289

Montserrat, although part of England's empire, was settled largely by the Irish and provides an opportunity to view the interaction of Irish emigrants with English imperialism in a situation where the Irish were not a small minority among white settlers. Within this context Akenson explores whether Irish imperialism on Montserrat differed from English imperialism in other colonies. Akenson reveals that the Irish proved to be as effective and as unfeeling colonists as the English and the Scottish, despite the long history of oppression in Ireland. He debunks the myth of the "nice" slave holder and the view that indentured labour prevailed in the West Indies in the seventeenth century. He also shows that the long-held habit of ignoring ethnic strife within the white ruling classes in the West Indies is misconceived. If the Irish Ran the World provides interesting insights into whether ethnicity was central to the making of the colonial world and the usefulness of studies of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century English imperialism in the Americas. It will be the basis of the Joanne Goodman Lectures at the University of Western Ontario in 1997.
Posted in History

Rethinking the Irish in the American South

Beyond Rounders and Reelers

Author: Bryan Albin Giemza

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 1617037982

Category: History

Page: 223

View: 1421

Studies of the Irish presence in America have tended to look to the main corridors of emigration, and hence outside the American South. Yet the Irish constituted a significant minority in the region. Indeed, the Irish fascination expresses itself in Southern context in powerful, but disparate, registers: music, literature, and often, a sense of shared heritage. Rethinking the Irish in the South aims to create a readable, thorough introduction to the subject, establishing new ground for areas of inquiry. These essays offer a revisionist critique of the Irish in the South, calling into question widely held understandings of how Irish culture was transmitted. The discussion ranges from Appalachian ballads, to Gone With the Wind, to the Irish rock band U2, to Atlantic-spanning literary friendships. Rather than seeing the Irish presence as "natural" or something completed in the past, these essays posit a shifting, evolving, and unstable influence. Taken collectively, they offer a new framework for interpreting the Irish in the region. The implications extend to the interpretation of migration patterns, to the understanding of Irish diaspora, and the assimilation of immigrants and their ideas
Posted in History

Everyday Life in the Early English Caribbean

Irish, Africans, and the Construction of Difference

Author: Jenny Shaw

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820346624

Category: History

Page: 259

View: 3445

The everyday lives of Irish and Africans are obscured by sources constructed by elites. Through her research, Shaw overcomes the constraints such sources impose by pushing methodological boundaries to fill in the gaps, silences, and absences that dominate the historical record.
Posted in History

Violent Delights, Violent Ends

Sex, Race, and Honor in Colonial Cartagena de Indias

Author: Nicole von Germeten

Publisher: UNM Press

ISBN: 0826353967

Category: Social Science

Page: 328

View: 2304

This study of sexuality in seventeenth-century Latin America takes the reader beneath the surface of daily life in a colonial city. Cartagena was an important Spanish port and the site of an Inquisition high court, a slave market, a leper colony, a military base, and a prison colony—colonial institutions that imposed order by enforcing Catholicism, cultural and religious boundaries, and prevailing race and gender hierarchies. The city was also simmering with illegal activity, from contraband trade to prostitution to heretical religious practices. Nicole von Germeten’s research uncovers scandalous stories drawn from archival research in Inquisition cases, criminal records, wills, and other legal documents. The stories focus largely on sexual agency and honor: an insult directed at a married woman causes a deadly street battle; a young doña uses sex to manipulate a lustful, corrupt inquisitor. Scandals like these illustrate the central thesis of this book: women in colonial Cartagena de Indias took control of their own sex lives and used sex and rhetoric connected to sexuality to plead their cases when they had to negotiate with colonial bureaucrats.
Posted in Social Science

When the Luck of the Irish Ran Out

The World's Most Resilient Country and Its Struggle to Rise Again

Author: David J. J. Lynch

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 9780230112278

Category: Political Science

Page: 256

View: 5447

Few countries have been as dramatically transformed in recent years as Ireland. Once a culturally repressed land shadowed by terrorism and on the brink of economic collapse, Ireland finally emerged in the late 1990s as the fastest-growing country in Europe, with the typical citizen enjoying a higher standard of living than the average Brit. Just a few years after celebrating their newly-won status among the world's richest societies, the Irish are now saddled with a wounded, shrinking economy, soaring unemployment, and ruined public finances. After so many centuries of impoverishment, how did the Irish finally get rich, and how did they then fritter away so much so quickly? Veteran journalist David J. Lynch offers an insightful, character-driven narrative of how the Irish boom came to be and how it went bust. He opens our eyes to a nation's downfall through the lived experience of individual citizens: the people responsible for the current crisis as well as the ordinary men and women enduring it.
Posted in Political Science

Southern Cultures

Volume 18: Number 1 – Spring 2012 Issue

Author: Harry L. Watson,Jocelyn Neal

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 0807837628

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 4903

In the Spring 2012 issue of Southern Cultures… Blood rains. Snow falls. Bourbon makes the man. Irish Americans redefine black and white. Camp Wah-Kon-Dah glows in the embers of old memories. The great teacher Arthur Raper opens minds, hearts, and doors. And the creative spaces of geniuses await the next act. Table of Contents Front Porch by Harry L. Watson "What happens to frontier manhood when blacks, women, and gays drink bourbon too—and white fraternity boys get stuck with Smirnoff Ice from time to time?" Every Ounce a Man's Whiskey?: Bourbon in the White Masculine South by Sean S. McKeithan "The hot bite of the Bourbon sensuously connects the body of the drinker to nation, region, and locale, enjoining his experience with those of imagined, historical bodies, soaking up space and place in the slow burn of what appears an endless southern summertime." Native Ground: Photographs by Rob McDonald "If convention has it right, these are writers who bear something close to a genetic predisposition to produce a literature suffused with place." Turned Inside Out: Black, White, and Irish in the South by Bryan Giemza "As a place where Black and Green were in perpetual contact, the Atlantic South furnishes an ideal case study in how these peoples moved with, against, and around one another." "God First, You Second, Me Third": An Exploration of "Quiet Jewishness"at Camp Wah- Kon- Dah by Marcie Cohen Ferris "This was an anxious time for American Jews, stung by the anti- Semitic quotas and discrimination of the interwar years and the growing horror regarding the fate of European Jewry as the Holocaust came to light in the 1940s." "A Mind- Opening Influence of Great Importance": Arthur Raper at Agnes Scott College by Clifford M. Kuhn "He was such an eye- opener to me . . . such a reversal of the whole way you think about life and society." "For the Scrutiny of Science and the Light of Revelation": American Blood Falls by Tom Maxwell "Showers of blood, however dreadful, were not news. Pliny, Cicero, Livy, and Plutarch mentioned rains of blood and flesh. Zeus makes it rain blood, 'as a portent of slaughter,' in Homer's Iliad." Mason- Dixon Lines Bourbon Poetry by R. T. Smith ". . . Earl was a steady liar who never in his life solved a single crime, to hear my father tell it, an improvident soul prone to nocturnal misdemeanors himself . . ." Southern Snow by Nancy Hatch Woodward "There's a silence in a snowy dawn that forces you to look anew at what has been transformed from the customary landscape of your day- to- day life. Dogwoods glisten in their silver finery; bowing fir limbs form a secret cathedral." Southern Cultures is published quarterly (spring, summer, fall, winter) by the University of North Carolina Press. The journal is sponsored by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's Center for the Study of the American South.
Posted in History

Ethnic Groups of the Americas: An Encyclopedia

An Encyclopedia

Author: James B. Minahan

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1610691644

Category: Social Science

Page: 411

View: 1897

Intended to help students explore ethnic identity—one of the most important issues of the 21st century—this concise, one-stop reference presents rigorously researched content on the national groups and ethnicities of North America, Central America, South America, and the Caribbean.
Posted in Social Science

Faithful Bodies

Performing Religion and Race in the Puritan Atlantic

Author: Heather Miyano Kopelson

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 1479852341

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 7588

In the seventeenth-century English Atlantic, religious beliefs and practices played a central role in creating racial identity. English Protestantism provided a vocabulary and structure to describe and maintain boundaries between insider and outsider. In this path-breaking study, Heather Miyano Kopelson peels back the layers of conflicting definitions of bodies and competing practices of faith in the puritan Atlantic, demonstrating how the categories of “white,” “black,” and “Indian” developed alongside religious boundaries between “Christian” and “heathen” and between “Catholic” and “Protestant.” Faithful Bodies focuses on three communities of Protestant dissent in the Atlantic World: Bermuda, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island. In this “puritan Atlantic,” religion determined insider and outsider status: at times Africans and Natives could belong as long as they embraced the Protestant faith, while Irish Catholics and English Quakers remained suspect. Colonists’ interactions with indigenous peoples of the Americas and with West Central Africans shaped their understandings of human difference and its acceptable boundaries. Prayer, religious instruction, sexual behavior, and other public and private acts became markers of whether or not blacks and Indians were sinning Christians or godless heathens. As slavery became law, transgressing people of color counted less and less as sinners in English puritans’ eyes, even as some of them made Christianity an integral part of their communities. As Kopelson shows, this transformation proceeded unevenly but inexorably during the long seventeenth century.
Posted in History

An Irish History of Civilization

Author: Donald H. Akenson

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN: 9780773528918

Category: History

Page: 704

View: 9208

The grace of fiction combined with the power of history
Posted in History

The Pope's Children

The Irish Economic Triumph and the Rise of Ireland's New Elite

Author: David McWilliams

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781118045374

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 331

View: 4593

Named for the ironic coincidence of the Irish baby boom of the 1970s, which peaked nine months to the day after Pope John Paul II’s historic visit to Dublin, The Pope’s Children is both a celebration and bitingly funny portrait of the first generation of the Celtic Tiger—the beneficiaries of the economic miracle that propelled Ireland from centuries of deprivation into a nation that now enjoys one of the highest living standards in the world.
Posted in Business & Economics

How the Scots Invented the Modern World

The True Story of How Western Europe's Poorest Nation Created Our World and Ever ything in It

Author: Arthur Herman

Publisher: Broadway Books

ISBN: 9780307420954

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 2888

An exciting account of the origins of the modern world Who formed the first literate society? Who invented our modern ideas of democracy and free market capitalism? The Scots. As historian and author Arthur Herman reveals, in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries Scotland made crucial contributions to science, philosophy, literature, education, medicine, commerce, and politics—contributions that have formed and nurtured the modern West ever since. Herman has charted a fascinating journey across the centuries of Scottish history. Here is the untold story of how John Knox and the Church of Scotland laid the foundation for our modern idea of democracy; how the Scottish Enlightenment helped to inspire both the American Revolution and the U.S. Constitution; and how thousands of Scottish immigrants left their homes to create the American frontier, the Australian outback, and the British Empire in India and Hong Kong. How the Scots Invented the Modern World reveals how Scottish genius for creating the basic ideas and institutions of modern life stamped the lives of a series of remarkable historical figures, from James Watt and Adam Smith to Andrew Carnegie and Arthur Conan Doyle, and how Scottish heroes continue to inspire our contemporary culture, from William “Braveheart” Wallace to James Bond. And no one who takes this incredible historical trek will ever view the Scots—or the modern West—in the same way again.
Posted in History

Letters on the Irish Nation:

Written During a Visit to that Kingdom, in the Autumn of the Year 1799

Author: George Cooper (barrister-at-law.)

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Ireland

Page: 201

View: 8529

Posted in Ireland

The New World

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 4038

Posted in

The Works of the British Poets

With Prefaces, Biographical and Critical

Author: Robert Anderson

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: English poetry

Page: N.A

View: 2233

Posted in English poetry

Ireland Says Yes

The Inside Story of How the Vote for Marriage Equality Was Won

Author: Gráinne Healy,Brian Sheehan,Noel Whelan

Publisher: Merrion Press

ISBN: 1785370391

Category: Political Science

Page: 224

View: 7961

At 7.20pm on 23rd May 2015, in the courtyard of Dublin Castle, Ireland truly became a nation of equals. Ireland Says Yes is the fast-paced narrative account of all the drama, excitement and highs and lows of the last 100 days of the extraordinary campaign for a Yes vote in the 2015 Marriage Equality Referendum. Those who led the Yes Equality campaign tell the inside story of how the referendum was won, and how Ireland’s two principal gay and lesbian rights organisations put together the most effective and successful civic society campaign ever launched in Irish politics. As well as a drama-packed chronological account of how the Yes campaign was executed, the book explores how social media mobilised a new generation of voters to the polls and how political parties, student unions and youth groups co-ordinated their efforts to deliver one of the most historic referendum results in Irish political history.
Posted in Political Science

Painted Ladies

Author: James Neal Harvey

Publisher: Overamstel Uitgevers

ISBN: 9049980406

Category: Fiction

Page: N.A

View: 9821

NYPD detective Ben Tolliver tracks a killer with a taste for expensive call girls When the escort service sends Caroline to the Plaza, she dreams of a handsome client with an open wallet. Instead, she is greeted by the businessman’s assistant, who insists on vetting the girl before she can start work. At her command, Caroline undresses, turns around, and feels something tighten around her throat. Homicide detective Ben Tolliver is surprised to get called in for a murder at the Plaza. Though Midtown may not be his beat, sex crimes are, and this one is especially chilling. Caroline was strangled, her face and body coated with grotesque makeup. The murder is baffling enough, but when the dead girl’s millionaire father gets involved, Tolliver’s investigation threatens to erupt into a circus where the main attraction is a killer who paints women like clowns.
Posted in Fiction

The Twentieth Century

Author: Edith Girvin

Publisher: Heinemann

ISBN: 9780435320935

Category: History, Modern

Page: 64

View: 7485

Written for S1 and S2, and endorsed by the Scottish Association of Teachers of History, this text covers key aspects of study recommended in the 5-14 guidelines. Skills questions help develop and monitor students' understanding and thinking.
Posted in History, Modern

Encyclopfdia of Superstitions, Folklore, and the Occult Sciences of the World

Author: Cora Linn Daniels,C. M. Stevans

Publisher: The Minerva Group, Inc.

ISBN: 9781410209153

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 668

View: 2500

Originally published in 1903, this is an excellent source for an historical perspective on superstitions and folklore. Hundreds of entries are arranged alphabetically within broad subject categories. The original subtitle reads: "A comprehensive library of human belief and practice in the mysteries of life through more than six thousand years of experience and progress including the fundamental intuitions and instincts underlying the structure of civilization, theology, mythology, demonology, magic, witchcraft, esoteric philosophy, signs, omens, oracles, sorceries, auguries, divinations, prophecies, methods and means employed in revealing fortune and fate, systems and formulas for the use of psychical forces, hypnotism, clairvoyance, telepathy, spiritualism, character reading and character building with all the known powers and wonders of mind and soul, illustrated with numerous ancient and modern designs and thoroughly indexed."
Posted in Body, Mind & Spirit

Dublin's Great Wars

The First World War, the Easter Rising and the Irish Revolution

Author: Richard S. Grayson

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107029252

Category: History

Page: 424

View: 9723

The story of the Dubliners who served in the British military and in republican forces during the First World War and the Irish Revolution.
Posted in History