If the Irish Ran the World

Montserrat, 1630-1730

Author: Donald H. Akenson

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN: 9780773516861

Category: History

Page: 273

View: 3728

Montserrat, although part of England's empire, was settled largely by the Irish and provides an opportunity to view the interaction of Irish emigrants with English imperialism in a situation where the Irish were not a small minority among white settlers. Within this context Akenson explores whether Irish imperialism on Montserrat differed from English imperialism in other colonies. Akenson reveals that the Irish proved to be as effective and as unfeeling colonists as the English and the Scottish, despite the long history of oppression in Ireland. He debunks the myth of the "nice" slave holder and the view that indentured labour prevailed in the West Indies in the seventeenth century. He also shows that the long-held habit of ignoring ethnic strife within the white ruling classes in the West Indies is misconceived. If the Irish Ran the World provides interesting insights into whether ethnicity was central to the making of the colonial world and the usefulness of studies of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century English imperialism in the Americas. It will be the basis of the Joanne Goodman Lectures at the University of Western Ontario in 1997.
Posted in History

The Irish in Ontario

A Study in Rural History

Author: Donald H. Akenson

Publisher: Kingston [Ont.] : McGill-Queen's University Press

ISBN: 9780773504301

Category: History

Page: 404

View: 977

Detailed analysis of the process of their settlement and adaptation in an eastern Ontario township of the Irish.
Posted in History

Rethinking the Irish in the American South

Beyond Rounders and Reelers

Author: Bryan Albin Giemza

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 1617037982

Category: History

Page: 223

View: 1550

Studies of the Irish presence in America have tended to look to the main corridors of emigration, and hence outside the American South. Yet the Irish constituted a significant minority in the region. Indeed, the Irish fascination expresses itself in Southern context in powerful, but disparate, registers: music, literature, and often, a sense of shared heritage. Rethinking the Irish in the South aims to create a readable, thorough introduction to the subject, establishing new ground for areas of inquiry. These essays offer a revisionist critique of the Irish in the South, calling into question widely held understandings of how Irish culture was transmitted. The discussion ranges from Appalachian ballads, to Gone With the Wind, to the Irish rock band U2, to Atlantic-spanning literary friendships. Rather than seeing the Irish presence as "natural" or something completed in the past, these essays posit a shifting, evolving, and unstable influence. Taken collectively, they offer a new framework for interpreting the Irish in the region. The implications extend to the interpretation of migration patterns, to the understanding of Irish diaspora, and the assimilation of immigrants and their ideas
Posted in History

Everyday Life in the Early English Caribbean

Irish, Africans, and the Construction of Difference

Author: Jenny Shaw

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820346624

Category: History

Page: 259

View: 6138

The everyday lives of Irish and Africans are obscured by sources constructed by elites. Through her research, Shaw overcomes the constraints such sources impose by pushing methodological boundaries to fill in the gaps, silences, and absences that dominate the historical record.
Posted in History

The Global Dimensions of Irish Identity

Race, Nation, and the Popular Press, 1840-1880

Author: Cian T. McMahon

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469620111

Category: History

Page: 254

View: 2269

Though Ireland is a relatively small island on the northeastern fringe of the Atlantic, 70 million people worldwide--including some 45 million in the United States--claim it as their ancestral home. In this wide-ranging, ambitious book, Cian T. McMahon explores the nineteenth-century roots of this transnational identity. Between 1840 and 1880, 4.5 million people left Ireland to start new lives abroad. Using primary sources from Ireland, Australia, and the United States, McMahon demonstrates how this exodus shaped a distinctive sense of nationalism. By doggedly remaining loyal to both their old and new homes, he argues, the Irish helped broaden the modern parameters of citizenship and identity. From insurrection in Ireland to exile in Australia to military service during the American Civil War, McMahon's narrative revolves around a group of rebels known as Young Ireland. They and their fellow Irish used weekly newspapers to construct and express an international identity tailored to the fluctuating world in which they found themselves. Understanding their experience sheds light on our contemporary debates over immigration, race, and globalization.
Posted in History

The Oxford Handbook of Modern Irish History

Author: Alvin Jackson

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191667609

Category: History

Page: 640

View: 6881

The study of Irish history, once riven and constricted, has recently enjoyed a resurgence, with new practitioners, new approaches, and new methods of investigation. The Oxford Handbook of Modern Irish History represents the diversity of this emerging talent and achievement by bringing together 36 leading scholars of modern Ireland and embracing 400 years of Irish history, uniting early and late modernists as well as contemporary historians. The Handbook offers a set of scholarly perspectives drawn from numerous disciplines, including history, political science, literature, geography, and the Irish language. It looks at the Irish at home as well as in their migrant and diasporic communities. The Handbook combines sets of wide thematic and interpretative essays, with more detailed investigations of particular periods. Each of the contributors offers a summation of the state of scholarship within their subject area, linking their own research insights with assessments of future directions within the discipline. In its breadth and depth and diversity, The Oxford Handbook of Modern Irish History offers an authoritative and vibrant portrayal of the history of modern Ireland.
Posted in History

The Irish Diaspora

Author: Andrew Bielenberg

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317878116

Category: History

Page: 376

View: 1626

This book brings together a series of articles which provide an overview of the Irish Diaspora from a global perspective. It combines a series of survey articles on the major destinations of the Diaspora; the USA, Britian and the British Empire. On each of these, there is a number of more specialist articles by historians, demographers, economists, sociologists and geographers. The inter-disciplinary approach of the book, with a strong historical and modern focus, provides the first comprehensive survey of the topic.
Posted in History

Violent Delights, Violent Ends

Sex, Race, and Honor in Colonial Cartagena de Indias

Author: Nicole von Germeten

Publisher: UNM Press

ISBN: 0826353967

Category: Social Science

Page: 328

View: 6557

This study of sexuality in seventeenth-century Latin America takes the reader beneath the surface of daily life in a colonial city. Cartagena was an important Spanish port and the site of an Inquisition high court, a slave market, a leper colony, a military base, and a prison colony—colonial institutions that imposed order by enforcing Catholicism, cultural and religious boundaries, and prevailing race and gender hierarchies. The city was also simmering with illegal activity, from contraband trade to prostitution to heretical religious practices. Nicole von Germeten’s research uncovers scandalous stories drawn from archival research in Inquisition cases, criminal records, wills, and other legal documents. The stories focus largely on sexual agency and honor: an insult directed at a married woman causes a deadly street battle; a young doña uses sex to manipulate a lustful, corrupt inquisitor. Scandals like these illustrate the central thesis of this book: women in colonial Cartagena de Indias took control of their own sex lives and used sex and rhetoric connected to sexuality to plead their cases when they had to negotiate with colonial bureaucrats.
Posted in Social Science

Southern Cultures

Volume 18: Number 1 – Spring 2012 Issue

Author: Harry L. Watson,Jocelyn Neal

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 0807837628

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 8437

In the Spring 2012 issue of Southern Cultures… Blood rains. Snow falls. Bourbon makes the man. Irish Americans redefine black and white. Camp Wah-Kon-Dah glows in the embers of old memories. The great teacher Arthur Raper opens minds, hearts, and doors. And the creative spaces of geniuses await the next act. Table of Contents Front Porch by Harry L. Watson "What happens to frontier manhood when blacks, women, and gays drink bourbon too—and white fraternity boys get stuck with Smirnoff Ice from time to time?" Every Ounce a Man's Whiskey?: Bourbon in the White Masculine South by Sean S. McKeithan "The hot bite of the Bourbon sensuously connects the body of the drinker to nation, region, and locale, enjoining his experience with those of imagined, historical bodies, soaking up space and place in the slow burn of what appears an endless southern summertime." Native Ground: Photographs by Rob McDonald "If convention has it right, these are writers who bear something close to a genetic predisposition to produce a literature suffused with place." Turned Inside Out: Black, White, and Irish in the South by Bryan Giemza "As a place where Black and Green were in perpetual contact, the Atlantic South furnishes an ideal case study in how these peoples moved with, against, and around one another." "God First, You Second, Me Third": An Exploration of "Quiet Jewishness"at Camp Wah- Kon- Dah by Marcie Cohen Ferris "This was an anxious time for American Jews, stung by the anti- Semitic quotas and discrimination of the interwar years and the growing horror regarding the fate of European Jewry as the Holocaust came to light in the 1940s." "A Mind- Opening Influence of Great Importance": Arthur Raper at Agnes Scott College by Clifford M. Kuhn "He was such an eye- opener to me . . . such a reversal of the whole way you think about life and society." "For the Scrutiny of Science and the Light of Revelation": American Blood Falls by Tom Maxwell "Showers of blood, however dreadful, were not news. Pliny, Cicero, Livy, and Plutarch mentioned rains of blood and flesh. Zeus makes it rain blood, 'as a portent of slaughter,' in Homer's Iliad." Mason- Dixon Lines Bourbon Poetry by R. T. Smith ". . . Earl was a steady liar who never in his life solved a single crime, to hear my father tell it, an improvident soul prone to nocturnal misdemeanors himself . . ." Southern Snow by Nancy Hatch Woodward "There's a silence in a snowy dawn that forces you to look anew at what has been transformed from the customary landscape of your day- to- day life. Dogwoods glisten in their silver finery; bowing fir limbs form a secret cathedral." Southern Cultures is published quarterly (spring, summer, fall, winter) by the University of North Carolina Press. The journal is sponsored by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's Center for the Study of the American South.
Posted in History

Ethnic Groups of the Americas: An Encyclopedia

An Encyclopedia

Author: James B. Minahan

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1610691644

Category: Social Science

Page: 411

View: 5681

Intended to help students explore ethnic identity—one of the most important issues of the 21st century—this concise, one-stop reference presents rigorously researched content on the national groups and ethnicities of North America, Central America, South America, and the Caribbean.
Posted in Social Science

Faithful Bodies

Performing Religion and Race in the Puritan Atlantic

Author: Heather Miyano Kopelson

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 1479852341

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 7863

In the seventeenth-century English Atlantic, religious beliefs and practices played a central role in creating racial identity. English Protestantism provided a vocabulary and structure to describe and maintain boundaries between insider and outsider. In this path-breaking study, Heather Miyano Kopelson peels back the layers of conflicting definitions of bodies and competing practices of faith in the puritan Atlantic, demonstrating how the categories of “white,” “black,” and “Indian” developed alongside religious boundaries between “Christian” and “heathen” and between “Catholic” and “Protestant.” Faithful Bodies focuses on three communities of Protestant dissent in the Atlantic World: Bermuda, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island. In this “puritan Atlantic,” religion determined insider and outsider status: at times Africans and Natives could belong as long as they embraced the Protestant faith, while Irish Catholics and English Quakers remained suspect. Colonists’ interactions with indigenous peoples of the Americas and with West Central Africans shaped their understandings of human difference and its acceptable boundaries. Prayer, religious instruction, sexual behavior, and other public and private acts became markers of whether or not blacks and Indians were sinning Christians or godless heathens. As slavery became law, transgressing people of color counted less and less as sinners in English puritans’ eyes, even as some of them made Christianity an integral part of their communities. As Kopelson shows, this transformation proceeded unevenly but inexorably during the long seventeenth century.
Posted in History

The Pope's Children

The Irish Economic Triumph and the Rise of Ireland's New Elite

Author: David McWilliams

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781118045374

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 331

View: 4780

Named for the ironic coincidence of the Irish baby boom of the 1970s, which peaked nine months to the day after Pope John Paul II’s historic visit to Dublin, The Pope’s Children is both a celebration and bitingly funny portrait of the first generation of the Celtic Tiger—the beneficiaries of the economic miracle that propelled Ireland from centuries of deprivation into a nation that now enjoys one of the highest living standards in the world.
Posted in Business & Economics

Letters on the Irish Nation:

Written During a Visit to that Kingdom, in the Autumn of the Year 1799

Author: George Cooper (barrister-at-law.)

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Ireland

Page: 201

View: 6351

Posted in Ireland

The People with No Name

Ireland's Ulster Scots, America's Scots Irish, and the Creation of a British Atlantic World, 1689-1764

Author: Patrick Griffin

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 0691074623

Category: History

Page: 244

View: 9993

More than 100,000 Ulster Presbyterians of Scottish origin migrated to the American colonies in the six decades prior to the American Revolution, the largest movement of any group from the British Isles to British North America in the eighteenth century. Drawing on a vast store of archival materials, The People with No Name is the first book to tell this fascinating story in its full, transatlantic context. It explores how these people--whom one visitor to their Pennsylvania enclaves referred to as ''a spurious race of mortals known by the appellation Scotch-Irish''--drew upon both Old and New World experiences to adapt to staggering religious, economic, and cultural change. In remarkably crisp, lucid prose, Patrick Griffin uncovers the ways in which migrants from Ulster--and thousands like them--forged new identities and how they conceived the wider transatlantic community. The book moves from a vivid depiction of Ulster and its Presbyterian community in and after the Glorious Revolution to a brilliant account of religion and identity in early modern Ireland. Griffin then deftly weaves together religion and economics in the origins of the transatlantic migration, and examines how this traumatic and enlivening experience shaped patterns of settlement and adaptation in colonial America. In the American side of his story, he breaks new critical ground for our understanding of colonial identity formation and of the place of the frontier in a larger empire. The People with No Name will be indispensable reading for anyone interested in transatlantic history, American Colonial history, and the history of Irish and British migration.
Posted in History

The New World

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 3221

Posted in

The Prince

A Novel

Author: Vito Bruschini

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1451687214

Category: Fiction

Page: 448

View: 778

Based on a true story, The Prince is a “complex, informed, and intelligent saga” (Kirkus Reviews) about the web of love, betrayal, and murder that forged the most powerful criminal organization in history—the Mafia. In this remarkable novel, author Vito Bruschini brilliantly evokes the charismatic figure of Prince Ferdinando Licata, a wealthy Sicilian landowner who uses his personal power and charm to placate Sicilian peasants and fight off Mussolini’s fascists. As tensions rise in Italy during the 1930s, with increasingly violent consequences, Licata attracts many friends and even more enemies. Eventually implicated in a grisly murder, the prince flees to America, where he ends up navigating a turf war between Irish and Italian gangs of the Lower East Side. Violence explodes in unexpected ways as Licata gains dominance over New York, with the help of a loyal townsman with blood ties to the prince who is forced to abandon his fiancée in Sicily. The two men return to their native land at the height of World War II in an outrageously bold maneuver engineered by Licata and mobster Lucky Luciano. Both the prince and his kinsman assist US naval intelligence during the invasion of Sicily and, once they are back on their native soil, they proceed to settle unfinished business with their enemies and unravel old secrets in a stunning and sinister finale. Through a spellbinding story and unforgettable characters, Bruschini depicts in visceral detail the dark intertwining roots of loyalty and betrayal, poverty and privilege, secrets and revelations that contributed to the rise of the Mafia in Sicily and America.
Posted in Fiction

Painted Ladies

Author: James Neal Harvey

Publisher: Overamstel Uitgevers

ISBN: 9049980406

Category: Fiction

Page: N.A

View: 2112

NYPD detective Ben Tolliver tracks a killer with a taste for expensive call girls When the escort service sends Caroline to the Plaza, she dreams of a handsome client with an open wallet. Instead, she is greeted by the businessman’s assistant, who insists on vetting the girl before she can start work. At her command, Caroline undresses, turns around, and feels something tighten around her throat. Homicide detective Ben Tolliver is surprised to get called in for a murder at the Plaza. Though Midtown may not be his beat, sex crimes are, and this one is especially chilling. Caroline was strangled, her face and body coated with grotesque makeup. The murder is baffling enough, but when the dead girl’s millionaire father gets involved, Tolliver’s investigation threatens to erupt into a circus where the main attraction is a killer who paints women like clowns.
Posted in Fiction

The Tin Man

Author: Dale Brown

Publisher: Bantam

ISBN: 0307429822

Category: Fiction

Page: 464

View: 4156

The master of military adventure creates the ultimate one-man army.... New York Times bestselling author Dale Brown pits men and technology against impossible odds, in vividly realized stories. Now, in his eleventh novel, he brings aerial combat hero Patrick McLanahan out of retirement and plunges him into the most personal war he's ever fought. His old enemy Gregory Townsend has come to America to ignite a reign of terror that will sweep across the nation. The police and the government seem powerless to stop him. And one of the first casualties in this war is a rookie cop--McLanahan's brother. McLanahan has plenty of experience in war. And so does arms expert Jon Masters. Using Masters's deadliest weapon yet, McLanahan becomes a one-man army, known on the streets as the Tin Man. But this time, technology is a double-edged sword--and his war of revenge may destroy McLanahan himself... and everything he stands for. From the Paperback edition.
Posted in Fiction

His Woman in Command & Operations: Forbidden

Operation: Forbidden

Author: Lindsay McKenna

Publisher: Harlequin

ISBN: 1460383540

Category: Fiction

Page: N.A

View: 4408

Two Jaguar Squadron stories in one volume—for the first time!—from New York Times bestselling author Lindsay McKenna His Woman in Command Captain Nike Alexander is in Afghanistan to use her pilot skills. She doesn't have time for men, especially military men. Playing hard to get with Captain Gavin Jackson comes as naturally to Nike as flying one of her Apaches. But Gavin's sexy-as-sin smile makes it hard to say no. Then she gets into a dangerous situation, and his special ops skills could save her. Operation: Forbidden Helicopter pilot Captain Emma Cantrell has a chance to clear her military record in war-torn Afghanistan. She won't let anyone get in her way—especially Afghan Captain Khalid Shaheen. Sure, he's total eye candy. But she's fallen prey to his kind of charm before—and she never makes the same mistake twice. Then she's kidnapped, and he could be the only one to rescue her.
Posted in Fiction