Humankind

Solidarity with Non-Human People

Author: Timothy Morton

Publisher: Verso Books

ISBN: 1786631334

Category: Philosophy

Page: 224

View: 1682

A radical call for solidarity between humans and non-humans What is it that makes humans human? As science and technology challenge the boundaries between life and non-life, between organic and inorganic, this ancient question is more timely than ever. Acclaimed Object-Oriented philosopher Timothy Morton invites us to consider this philosophical issue as eminently political. It is in our relationship with non-humans that we decided the fate of our humanity. Becoming human, claims Morton, actually means creating a network of kindness and solidarity with non-human beings, in the name of a broader understanding of reality that both includes and overcomes the notion of species. Negotiating the politics of humanity is the first and crucial step to reclaim the upper scales of ecological coexistence, not to let Monsanto and cryogenically suspended billionaires to define them and own them. From the Trade Paperback edition.
Posted in Philosophy

Humankind

Solidarity with Non-Human People

Author: Timothy Morton

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781788731003

Category: Nature

Page: 224

View: 2829

A radical call for solidarity between humans and non-humans What is it that makes humans human? As science and technology challenge the boundaries between life and non-life, between organic and inorganic, this ancient question is more timely than ever. Acclaimed object-oriented philosopher Timothy Morton invites us to consider this philosophical issue as eminently political. In our relationship with nonhumans, we decide the fate of our humanity. Becoming human, claims Morton, actually means creating a network of kindness and solidarity with nonhuman beings, in the name of a broader understanding of reality that both includes and overcomes the notion of species. Negotiating the politics of humanity is the first crucial step in reclaiming the upper scales of ecological coexistence and resisting corporations like Monsanto and the technophilic billionaires who would rob us of our kinship with people beyond our species.
Posted in Nature

Humankind

Solidarity with Nonhuman People

Author: Timothy Morton

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781786632814

Category: Animals (Philosophy)

Page: 205

View: 6150

Things in common: an introduction -- Life -- Specters -- Subscendence -- Species -- Kindness
Posted in Animals (Philosophy)

Ecology Without Nature

Rethinking Environmental Aesthetics

Author: Timothy Morton

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674024342

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 249

View: 7113

In Ecology without Nature, Timothy Morton argues that the chief stumbling block to environmental thinking is the image of nature itself. Ecological writers propose a new worldview, but their very zeal to preserve the natural world leads them away from the "nature" they revere. The problem is a symptom of the ecological catastrophe in which we are living. Morton sets out a seeming paradox: to have a properly ecological view, we must relinquish the idea of nature once and for all. Ecology without Nature investigates our ecological assumptions in a way that is provocative and deeply engaging. Ranging widely in eighteenth-century through contemporary philosophy, culture, and history, he explores the value of art in imagining environmental projects for the future. Morton develops a fresh vocabulary for reading "environmentality" in artistic form as well as content, and traces the contexts of ecological constructs through the history of capitalism. From John Clare to John Cage, from Kierkegaard to Kristeva, from The Lord of the Rings to electronic life forms, Ecology without Nature widens our view of ecological criticism, and deepens our understanding of ecology itself. Instead of trying to use an idea of nature to heal what society has damaged, Morton sets out a radical new form of ecological criticism: "dark ecology."
Posted in Literary Criticism

Dark Ecology

For a Logic of Future Coexistence

Author: Timothy Morton

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231541368

Category: Philosophy

Page: 208

View: 6730

Timothy Morton argues that ecological awareness in the present Anthropocene era takes the form of a strange loop or Möbius strip, twisted to have only one side. Deckard travels this oedipal path in Blade Runner (1982) when he learns that he might be the enemy he has been ordered to pursue. Ecological awareness takes this shape because ecological phenomena have a loop form that is also fundamental to the structure of how things are. The logistics of agricultural society resulted in global warming and hardwired dangerous ideas about life-forms into the human mind. Dark ecology puts us in an uncanny position of radical self-knowledge, illuminating our place in the biosphere and our belonging to a species in a sense that is far less obvious than we like to think. Morton explores the logical foundations of the ecological crisis, which is suffused with the melancholy and negativity of coexistence yet evolving, as we explore its loop form, into something playful, anarchic, and comedic. His work is a skilled fusion of humanities and scientific scholarship, incorporating the theories and findings of philosophy, anthropology, literature, ecology, biology, and physics. Morton hopes to reestablish our ties to nonhuman beings and to help us rediscover the playfulness and joy that can brighten the dark, strange loop we traverse.
Posted in Philosophy

Being Ecological

Author: Timothy Morton

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 0262346869

Category: Political Science

Page: 216

View: 2239

Don't care about ecology? You think you don't, but you might all the same. Don't read ecology books? This book is for you. Ecology books can be confusing information dumps that are out of date by the time they hit you. Slapping you upside the head to make you feel bad. Grabbing you by the lapels while yelling disturbing facts. Handwringing in agony about "What are we going to do?" This book has none of that. Being Ecological doesn't preach to the eco-choir. It's for you -- even, Timothy Morton explains, if you're not in the choir, even if you have no idea what choirs are. You might already be ecological. After establishing the approach of the book (no facts allowed!), Morton draws on Kant and Heidegger to help us understand living in an age of mass extinction caused by global warming. He considers the object of ecological awareness and ecological thinking: the biosphere and its interconnections. He discusses what sorts of actions count as ecological -- starting a revolution? going to the garden center to smell the plants? And finally, in "Not a Grand Tour of Ecological Thought," he explores a variety of current styles of being ecological -- a range of overlapping orientations rather than preformatted self-labeling. Caught up in the us-versus-them (or you-versus-everything else) urgency of ecological crisis, Morton suggests, it's easy to forget that you are a symbiotic being entangled with other symbiotic beings. Isn't that being ecological?
Posted in Political Science

Nothing

Three Inquiries in Buddhism

Author: Marcus Boon,Eric Cazdyn,Timothy Morton

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022623326X

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 283

View: 630

Though contemporary European philosophy and critical theory have long had a robust engagement with Christianity, there has been no similar engagement with Buddhism—a surprising lack, given Buddhism's global reach and obvious affinities with much of Continental philosophy. This volume fills that gap, bringing together three scholars to offer individual, distinct, yet complementary philosophical takes on Buddhism. Focused on “nothing”—essential to Buddhism, of course, but also a key concept in critical theory from Hegel and Marx through deconstruction, queer theory, and contemporary speculative philosophy—the book explores different ways of rethinking Buddhism's nothing. Through an elaboration of “sunyata,” or emptiness, in both critical and Buddhist traditions; an examination of the problem of praxis in Buddhism, Marxism, and psychoanalysis; and an explication of a “Buddaphobia” that is rooted in modern anxieties about nothingness, Marcus Boon, Eric Cazdyn, and Timothy Morton open up new spaces in which the radical cores of Buddhism and critical theory are renewed and revealed.
Posted in Literary Criticism

Realist Magic

Objects, Ontology, Causality (New Metaphysics)

Author: Timothy Morton

Publisher: Open Humanitites Press

ISBN: 9781607852025

Category: Aesthetics

Page: 228

View: 9893

"Object-oriented ontology offers a startlingly fresh way to think about causality that takes into account developments in physics since 1900. Causality, argues, Object Oriented Ontology (OOO), is aesthetic. In this book, Timothy Morton explores what it means to say that a thing has come into being, that it is persisting, and that it has ended. Drawing from examples in physics, biology, ecology, art, literature and music, Morton demonstrates the counterintuitive yet elegant explanatory power of OOO for thinking causality."--Publisher's description.
Posted in Aesthetics

Shelley and the Revolution in Taste

The Body and the Natural World

Author: Timothy Morton

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521471350

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 298

View: 5542

A highly original study of Shelley's thought in relation to diet, consumption, the body, nature, and culture.
Posted in Literary Criticism

The Last Night

Anti-Work, Atheism, Adventure

Author: Federico Campagna

Publisher: John Hunt Publishing

ISBN: 1782791949

Category: Philosophy

Page: 106

View: 9037

Our secular society seems to have finally found its new God: Work. As technological progress makes human labor superfluous, and over-production destroys both the economy and the planet, Work remains stronger than ever as a mantra of universal submission. This book develops a fully-fledged theory of radical atheism, advocating a disrespectful, opportunist squandering of obedience. By replacing hope and faith with adventure, The Last Night of our lives might finally become the first morning of an autonomous future.
Posted in Philosophy

Process and Difference

Between Cosmological and Poststructuralist Postmodernisms

Author: Catherine Keller,Anne Daniell

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 0791488985

Category: Philosophy

Page: 272

View: 3696

Leading scholars explore the relationship between deconstructive theory and process thought.
Posted in Philosophy

HumAnimal

Race, Law, Language

Author: Kalpana Seshadri

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN: 0816677883

Category: Philosophy

Page: 309

View: 1208

Power and counterpower in the space of silence
Posted in Philosophy

The Ecological Thought

Author: Timothy Morton

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674056736

Category: Nature

Page: 184

View: 2028

In this passionate, lucid, and surprising book, Timothy Morton argues that all forms of life are connected in a vast, entangling mesh. This interconnectedness penetrates all dimensions of life. No being, construct, or object can exist independently from the ecological entanglement, Morton contends, nor does “Nature” exist as an entity separate from the uglier or more synthetic elements of life.
Posted in Nature

The Poetics of Spice

Romantic Consumerism and the Exotic

Author: Timothy Morton

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521026666

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 300

View: 4507

This 2000 book explores the literary and cultural significance of spice, and the spice trade, in Romantic literature.
Posted in Literary Criticism

The Green Light

A Self-Critique of the Ecological Movement

Author: Bernard Charbonneau

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1350027103

Category: Philosophy

Page: 248

View: 4070

The Green Light ('Le Feu Vert') offers an original and profound exploration of the roots of environmental philosophy and the Anthropocene. Bernard Charbonneau situates the wellspring of the ecological movement in the dialectics of Nature and Freedom, and their needful but uneasy joining against the totalizing system of technological society that threatens them both. Using this paradoxical tension as a yardstick, he probes the ways in which concepts of Nature have developed as industrialization became second nature and jeopardized the original, taken for granted until its advent. This allows Charbonneau to explain how movements and policies claiming to deal with this issue have gone wrong. A spirited critique of how the environmental movement has taken shape in relation to philosophy, politics, theology and contemporary culture, this book written in 1980 is representative of an oft-overlooked strand of French environmentalist thought, as a look back on its first decade in the public eye by a man who had originated political ecology half a century earlier. Charbonneau can be said to have prepared the way for many current concerns within environmental thought: the tension between liberalism and ecologism in green political theory; the wider question of the compatibility of ecological imperatives with supposedly foundational freedoms under capitalism; the discussions over how to balance existing democratic structures with environmental goals; the tensions between radical and reformist strategies within green movements; the controversy over the core values of ecological politics in a world transformed by climate change and peak everything; and the proper attitude of environmental movements to institutional science. This ground-breaking work should be front and centre of the debates that he anticipated, while giving a timely perspective on the interconnected questions of nature and human freedom. This first English translation of a work by Bernard Charbonneau provides not only a vivid account of environmental philosophy, but an introduction to this important author's thought.
Posted in Philosophy

Technic and Magic

The Reconstruction of Reality

Author: Federico Campagna

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1350044032

Category: Philosophy

Page: 256

View: 5542

We take for granted that only certain kind of things exist – electrons but not angels, passports but not nymphs. This is what we understand as 'reality'. But in fact, 'reality' varies with each era of the world, in turn shaping the field of what is possible to do, think and imagine. Our contemporary age has embraced a troubling and painful form of reality: Technic. Under Technic, the foundations of reality begin to crumble, shrinking the field of the possible and freezing our lives in an anguished state of paralysis. Technic and Magic shows that the way out of the present deadlock lies much deeper than debates on politics or economics. By drawing from an array of Northern and Southern sources – spanning from Heidegger, Junger and Stirner's philosophies, through Pessoa's poetry, to Advaita Vedanta, Bhartrhari, Ibn Arabi, Suhrawardi and Mulla Sadra's theosophies – Magic is presented as an alternative system of reality to Technic. While Technic attempts to capture the world through an 'absolute language', Magic centres its reconstruction of the world around the notion of the 'ineffable' that lies at the heart of existence. Technic and Magic is an original philosophical work, and a timely cultural intervention. It disturbs our understanding of the structure of reality, while restoring it in a new form. This is possibly the most radical act: if we wish to change our world, first we have to change the idea of 'reality' that defines it.
Posted in Philosophy

Dancing with Disaster

Environmental Histories, Narratives, and Ethics for Perilous Times

Author: Kate Rigby

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 0813936896

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 9973

The calamitous impacts of climate change that are beginning to be felt around the world today expose the inextricability of human and natural histories. Arguing for a more complex account of such calamities, Kate Rigby examines a variety of past disasters, from the Black Death of the Middle Ages to the mega-hurricanes of the twenty-first century, revealing the dynamic interaction of diverse human and nonhuman factors in their causation, unfolding, and aftermath. Focusing on the link between the ways disasters are framed by the stories told about them and how people tend to respond to them in practice, Rigby also shows how works of narrative fiction invite ethical reflection on human relations with one another, with our often unruly earthly environs, and with other species in the face of eco-catastrophe. In its investigation of an array of authors from the Romantic period to the present—including Heinrich von Kleist, Mary Shelley, Theodor Storm, Colin Thiele, and Alexis Wright— Dancing with Disaster demonstrates the importance of the environmental humanities in the development of more creative, compassionate, ecologically oriented, and socially just responses to the perils and possibilities of the Anthropocene. Under the Sign of Nature: Explorations in Ecocriticism
Posted in Literary Criticism

Humankind

Author: Tom Bernardin,Mark Tutssel

Publisher: powerHouse Books

ISBN: 1576875490

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 244

View: 9500

Leo Burnett is one of the world's most successful advertising agencies, responsible for countless enduring ideas and creative campaigns. HumanKind provides a glimpse of the moment of germination within the inner sanctum of the advertising industry's most creative shop through interviews, conversations, transcripts and images. Aimed at advertisers, marketing experts, artists, designers, PR firms and anyone else interested in reaching out to others and conveying a message, HumanKind provides readers with a chance to get insider advice and strategy first-hand.
Posted in Business & Economics

Environmental Publics

Author: Sally Eden

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317280474

Category: Science

Page: 206

View: 1645

How do ordinary people think about the environment as they go about their daily lives? Does thinking about the environment make them do things differently? This book is the first to explore the idea of ‘environmental publics’, that is, the ways in which ordinary people engage with environmental issues across different practical contexts of work, play and home. Emphasising the practices of ‘environmental engagement’, Environmental Publics examines how people consume the environment, learn about it, campaign for its protection and enjoy it through their leisure time. But the book avoids relying on idealisations of ‘consumers’ or ‘citizens’, or theoretical constructs about behavioural norms that have traditionally dominated research in this field. Instead, this book differentiates environmental publics not by who they are but by what they are doing – their daily practices. It also analyses specifically the geographies of those practices – how what people do affects the environment but in different ways across time and space and at different scales – aspects of practices that are neglected in the literature. With an interdisciplinary perspective, this book will be of interest to students and scholars in geography, sociology, science and technology studies, political science and anthropology. It is written in an accessible and readable style, so as to be useful for preliminary and more advanced courses in environmental management, perception and policy, as well as in studies of modern society, consumption and environmentalism.
Posted in Science

Beasts at Bedtime

Revealing the Environmental Wisdom in Children’s Literature

Author: Liam Heneghan

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022643141X

Category: Nature

Page: 256

View: 4027

Talking lions, philosophical bears, very hungry caterpillars, wise spiders, altruistic trees, companionable moles, urbane elephants: this is the magnificent menagerie that delights our children at bedtime. Within the entertaining pages of many children’s books, however, also lie profound teachings about the natural world that can help children develop an educated and engaged appreciation of the dynamic environment they inhabit. In Beasts at Bedtime, scientist (and father) Liam Heneghan examines the environmental underpinnings of children’s stories. From Beatrix Potter to Harry Potter, Heneghan unearths the universal insights into our inextricable relationship with nature that underlie so many classic children’s stories. Some of the largest environmental challenges in coming years—from climate instability, the extinction crisis, freshwater depletion, and deforestation—are likely to become even more severe as this generation of children grows up. Though today’s young readers will bear the brunt of these environmental calamities, they will also be able to contribute to environmental solutions if prepared properly. And all it takes is an attentive eye: Heneghan shows how the nature curriculum is already embedded in bedtime stories, from the earliest board books like The Rainbow Fish to contemporary young adult classics like The Hunger Games. Beasts at Bedtime is an awakening to the vital environmental education children’s stories can provide—from the misadventures of The Runaway Bunny to more overt tales like The Lorax. Heneghan serves as our guide, drawing richly upon his own adolescent and parental experiences, as well as his travels in landscapes both experienced and imagined. Organized into thematic sections, the work winds its way through literary forests, colorful characters, and global environments. This book enthralls as it engages. Heneghan as a guide is as charming as he is insightful, showing how kids (and adults) can start to experience the natural world in incredible ways from the comfort of their own rooms. Beasts at Bedtime will help parents, teachers, and guardians extend those cozy times curled up together with a good book into a lifetime of caring for our planet.
Posted in Nature