Horror and the Horror Film

Author: Bruce F. Kawin

Publisher: Anthem Press

ISBN: 0857284495

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 252

View: 1818

'Horror and the Horror Film' is a vivid, compelling, insightful and well-written study of the horror film and its subgenres from 1896 to the present, concentrating on the nature of horror in reality and on film.
Posted in Performing Arts

The Dread of Difference

Gender and the Horror Film

Author: Barry Keith Grant

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292772459

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 560

View: 4777

"The Dread of Difference is a classic. Few film studies texts have been so widely read and so influential. It's rarely on the shelf at my university library, so continuously does it circulate. Now this new edition expands the already comprehensive coverage of gender in the horror film with new essays on recent developments such as the Hostel series and torture porn. Informative and enlightening, this updated classic is an essential reference for fans and students of horror movies."—Stephen Prince, editor of The Horror Film and author of Digital Visual Effects in Cinema: The Seduction of Reality "An impressive array of distinguished scholars . . . gazes deeply into the darkness and then forms a Dionysian chorus reaffirming that sexuality and the monstrous are indeed mated in many horror films."—Choice "An extremely useful introduction to recent thinking about gender issues within this genre."—Film Theory
Posted in Performing Arts

Film, Horror, and the Body Fantastic

Author: Linda Badley

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780313275234

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 199

View: 5638

Drawing from feminist film theory, psychoanalytic theory, cultural criticism, and gender studies, Badley interprets horror film as a discourse of the body.
Posted in Literary Criticism

Horror Film

Creating and Marketing Fear

Author: Steffen Hantke

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 9781578066926

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 261

View: 7490

In large part due to its emphasis on gore, screaming teenage girls, and otherworldly elements, horror films have received little critical attention from mainstream movie magazines and film-studies journals. In Horror Film: Creating and Marketing Fear, essayists focus primarily on how film technology, marketing, and distribution effectively create the aesthetics and reception of horror films. Previously unpublished, these essays cover several styles of horror film-including the silent German Expressionist masterpiece Nosferatu, the jittery mock-documentary The Blair Witch Project, and the gracefully shot The Exorcist. Essayists question how lighting, editing techniques, sound, and camera and film equipment affect how viewers perceive a horror movie. Some essays focus on groundbreaking films, such as Michael Powell's Peeping Tom and Robert Aldrich's What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? Most concentrate on a specific technique and how it is used in a variety of horror movies. Contributors explore how the evolution of editing in horror films and more realistic special effects have changed how these movies are made. Marketing and distribution are also explored to ascertain how the genre has become part of the American mainstream. Using a variety of critical approaches and concentrating on aspects of horror film that have been overlooked, Horror Film: Creating and Marketing Fear is a valuable, original addition to the growing body of work on the genre. Steffen Hantke, a professor of English at Sogang University in Seoul, South Korea, is the author of Conspiracy and Paranoia in Contemporary American Literature: The Works of Don DeLillo and Joseph McElroy.
Posted in Performing Arts

The Horror Film

Author: Stephen Prince

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 081354257X

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 280

View: 9114

In this volume, Stephen Prince has collected essays reviewing the history of the horror film and the psychological reasons for its persistent appeal, as well as discussions of the developmental responses of young adult viewers and children to the genre. The book focuses on recent postmodern examples such as The Blair Witch Project. In a daring move, the volume also examines Holocaust films in relation to horror. Part One features essays on the silent and classical Hollywood eras. Part Two covers the postWorld War II era and discusses the historical, aesthetic, and psychological characteristics of contemporary horror films. In contrast to horror during the classical Hollywood period, contemporary horror features more graphic and prolonged visualizations of disturbing and horrific imagery, as well as other distinguishing characteristics. Princes introduction provides an overview of the genre, contextualizing the readings that follow. Stephen Prince is professor of communications at Virginia Tech. He has written many film books, including Classical Film Violence: Designing and Regulating Brutality in Hollywood Cinema, 19301968, and has edited Screening Violence, also in the Depth of Field Series.
Posted in Performing Arts

The Horror Film

Author: Peter Hutchings

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317874099

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 256

View: 8137

The Horror Film is an in-depth exploration of one of the most consistently popular, but also most disreputable, of all the mainstream film genres. Since the early 1930s there has never been a time when horror films were not being produced in substantial numbers somewhere in the world and never a time when they were not being criticised, censored or banned. The Horror Film engages with the key issues raised by this most contentious of genres. It considers the reasons for horror's disreputability and seeks to explain why despite this horror has been so successful. Where precisely does the appeal of horror lie? An extended introductory chapter identifies what it is about horror that makes the genre so difficult to define. The chapter then maps out the historical development of the horror genre, paying particular attention to the international breadth and variety of horror production, with reference to films made in the United States, Britain, Italy, Spain and elsewhere. Subsequent chapters explore: The role of monsters, focusing on the vampire and the serial killer. The usefulness (and limitations) of psychological approaches to horror. The horror audience: what kind of people like horror (and what do other people think of them)? Gender, race and class in horror: how do horror films such as Bride of Frankenstein, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre and Blade relate to the social and political realities within which they are produced? Sound and horror: in what ways has sound contributed to the development of horror? Performance in horror: how have performers conveyed fear and terror throughout horror's history? 1970s horror: was this the golden age of horror production? Slashers and post-slashers: from Halloween to Scream and beyond. The Horror Film throws new light on some well-known horror films but also introduces the reader to examples of noteworthy but more obscure horror work. A final section provides a guide to further reading and an extensive bibliography. Accessibly written, The Horror Film is a lively and informative account of the genre that will appeal to students of cinema, film teachers and researchers, and horror lovers everywhere.
Posted in Performing Arts

Monsters in the Closet

Homosexuality and the Horror Film

Author: Harry M. Benshoff

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9780719044731

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 328

View: 5516

Monster in the Closet is a history of the horrors film that explores the genre's relationship to the social and cultural history of homosexuality in America. Drawing on a wide variety of films and primary source materials including censorship files, critical reviews, promotional materials, fanzines, men's magazines, and popular news weeklies, the book examines the historical figure of the movie monster in relation to various medical, psychological, religious and social models of homosexuality. While recent work within gay and lesbian studies has explored how the genetic tropes of the horror film intersect with popular culture's understanding of queerness, this is the first book to examine how the concept of the monster queer has evolved from era to era. From the gay and lesbian sensibilities encoded into the form and content of the classical Hollywood horror film, to recent films which play upon AIDS-related fears. Monster in the Closet examines how the horror film started and continues, to demonize (or quite literally "monsterize") queer sexuality, and what the pleasures and "costs" of such representations might be both for individual spectators and culture at large.
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Phallic Panic

Film, Horror and the Primal Uncanny

Author: Barbara Creed

Publisher: Melbourne Univ. Publishing

ISBN: 9780522851724

Category: Horror films

Page: 232

View: 2544

'Phallic Panic is not only an impressive and elegant work of scholarship; it breathes new life into debates around the horror film, illuminating the genre's eerie and unsettling power. Like her groundbreaking The Monstrous-Feminine, Creed's new book is destined to become a standard text in the field.' Pam Cook, Professor of European Film and Media, University of Southampton 'Barbara Creed asks the question "what does man want?" and takes us on an exhilarating trip through the Freudian uncanny and horror cinema to provide the answers. This is a lucid and compelling account of male monstrosity which exhumes the uncanny and makes it come to life all over again as something "primal", perverse and chillingly subversive.' Ken Gelder, author of Reading The Vampire and The Horror Reader Vampires, werewolves, cannibals and slashers-why do audiences find monsters in movies so terrifying? In Phallic Panic, Barbara Creed ranges widely across film, literature and myth, throwing new light on this haunted territory. Looking at classic horror films such as Frankenstein, The Shining and Jack the Ripper, Creed provocatively questions the anxieties, fears and the subversive thrills behind some of the most celebrated monsters. This follow-up to her influential book The Monstrous-Feminine is an important and enjoyable read for scholars and students of film, cultural studies, psychoanalysis and the visual arts.
Posted in Horror films

Planks of Reason

Essays on the Horror Film

Author: Barry Keith Grant,Christopher Sharrett

Publisher: Scarecrow Press

ISBN: 9780810850132

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 416

View: 4103

The original edition of Planks of Reason was the first academic critical anthology on horror. In retrospect, it appeared as a kind of homage to the "golden age" of the American horror film, as this genre played an increasing role in film culture and American life. This revised edition retains the spirit of the original, but also offers new takes on rediscovered classics and recent developments in the genre.
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Hammer and Beyond

The British Horror Film

Author: Peter Hutchings

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9780719037207

Category: Horror films

Page: 193

View: 2512

Posted in Horror films

The Pleasure and Pain of Cult Horror Films

An Historical Survey

Author: Bartłomiej Paszylk

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 0786453273

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 248

View: 8836

The horror genre harbors a number of films too bold or bizarre to succeed with mainstream audiences, but offering unique, startling and often groundbreaking qualities that have won them an enduring following. Beginning with Victor Sjöström’s The Phantom Carriage in 1921, this book tracks the evolution and influence of underground cult horror over the ensuing decades, closing with William Winckler’s Frankenstein vs. the Creature from Blood Cove in 2005. It discusses the features that define a cult film, trends and recurring symbols, and changing iconography within the genre through insightful analysis of 88 movies. Included are works by popular directors who got their start with cult horror films, including Oliver Stone, David Cronenberg and Peter Jackson.
Posted in Performing Arts

Horror, the Film Reader

Author: Mark Jancovich

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415235624

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 188

View: 6270

This title brings together key articles to provide a comprehensive resource for students of horror cinema. Combining classic and recent articles, each section explores a central issue of horror film.
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British Horror Cinema

Author: Steve Chibnall,Julian Petley

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415230032

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 242

View: 9998

British Horror Cinema investigates a wealth of horror filmmaking in Britain, from early chillers like The Ghoul and Dark Eyes of London to acknowledged classics such as Peeping Tom and The Wicker Man. Contributors explore the contexts in which British horror films have been censored and classified, judged by their critics and consumed by their fans. Uncovering neglected modern classics like Deathline, and addressing issues such as the representation of family and women, they consider the Britishness of British horror and examine sub-genres such as the psycho-thriller and witchcraftmovies, the work of the Amicus studio, and key filmmakers including Peter Walker. Chapters include: the 'Psycho Thriller' the British censors and horror cinema femininity and horror film fandom witchcraft and the occult in British horror Horrific films and 1930s British Cinema Peter Walker and Gothic revisionism. Also featuring a comprehensive filmography and interviews with key directors Clive Barker and Doug Bradley, this is one resource film studies students should not be without.
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The Horror Genre

From Beelzebub to Blair Witch

Author: Paul Wells

Publisher: Wallflower Press

ISBN: 9781903364000

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 130

View: 2787

A comprehensive introduction to the history and key themes of the genre. The main issues and debates raised by horror, and the approaches and theories that have been applied to horror texts are all featured. In addressing the evolution of the horror film in social and historical context, Paul Wells explores how it has reflected and commented upon particular historical periods, and asks how it may respond to the new millennium by citing recent innovations in the genre's development, such as the "urban myth" narrative underpinning Candyman and The Blair Witch Project. Over 300 films are treated, all of which are featured in the filmography.
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A History of Horror

Author: Wheeler W. Dixon

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 0813547954

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 248

View: 2919

Ever since horror leapt from popular fiction to the silver screen in the late 1890s, viewers have experienced fear and pleasure in exquisite combination. A History of Horror, with rare stills from classic films, is the only book to offer a comprehensive survey of this ever-popular film genre. Chronologically examining over fifty horror films from key periods, this one-stop sourcebook unearths the historical origins of legendary characters and explores how the genre fits into the Hollywood studio system and how its enormous success in American and European culture expanded globally over time.
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Deformed and Destructive Beings

The Purpose of Horror Films

Author: George Ochoa

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 0786486546

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 235

View: 4313

Why are audiences drawn to horror films? Previous answers to that question have included everything from a need to experience fear to a hunger for psychotherapy. This critical text proposes that the horror film’s primary purpose is to present monsters, best understood as deformed and destructive beings. These monsters satisfy the audience’s desire to know these beings, in particular those beings too fantastic and dangerous to know in real life. The text illuminates many aspects of the horror film genre, including epistemology, ethics, evaluation, history, monster taxonomy, and filmmaking techniques.
Posted in Performing Arts

Horror

Author: Brigid Cherry

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134049382

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 256

View: 7604

Horror cinema is a hugely successful, but at the same time culturally illicit genre that spans the history of cinema. It continues to flourish with recent cycles of supernatural horror and torture porn that span the full range of horror styles and aesthetics. It is enjoyed by audiences everywhere, but also seen as a malign influence by others. In this Routledge Film Guidebook, audience researcher and film scholar Brigid Cherry provides a comprehensive overview of the horror film and explores how the genre works. Examining the way horror films create images of gore and the uncanny through film technology and effects, Cherry provides an account of the way cinematic and stylistic devices create responses of terror and disgust in the viewer. Horror examines the way these films construct psychological and cognitive responses and how they speak to audiences on an intimate personal level, addressing their innermost fears and desires. Cherry further explores the role of horror cinema in society and culture, looking at how it represents various identity groups and engages with social anxieties, and examining the way horror sees, and is seen by, society.
Posted in Performing Arts

Recreational Terror

Women and the Pleasures of Horror Film Viewing

Author: Isabel Cristina Pinedo

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 1438416164

Category: Social Science

Page: 177

View: 9610

Challenges the conventional wisdom that violent horror films can only degrade women and incite violence.
Posted in Social Science

Dark Romance

Sexuality in the Horror Film

Author: David J. Hogan

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9780786462483

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 350

View: 6600

The darkly handsome man gazes deeply into her eyes. She finds him irresistible, wants to experience the passion of the moment. He grins—the movie audience can see his lengthened lateral incisors—and bends to her neck. The eroticism is horrible, and compelling. Audiences are drawn to horror cinema much as the surrendering victim. Afraid to watch, but more afraid something will be missed. Since the horror film is the most primal of all movie genres, seldom censored, these films tell us what we are about. From the silent era to the present day, Dark Romance explores horror cinema’s preoccupation with sexuality: vampires, beauty and the beast, victimization of women, “slasher” films, and more. Separate chapters focus upon individuals, like Alfred Hitchcock and Barbara Steele. Entertaining, and thought-provoking on the sexual fears and phobias of our society.
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Horror Films of the 1970s

Author: John Kenneth Muir

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9780786491568

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 684

View: 2787

The seventies were a decade of groundbreaking horror films: The Exorcist, Carrie, and Halloween were three. This detailed filmography covers these and 225 more. Section One provides an introduction and a brief history of the decade. Beginning with 1970 and proceeding chronologically by year of its release in the United States, Section Two offers an entry for each film. Each entry includes several categories of information: Critical Reception (sampling both ’70s and later reviews), Cast and Credits, P.O.V., (quoting a person pertinent to that film’s production), Synopsis (summarizing the film’s story), Commentary (analyzing the film from Muir’s perspective), Legacy (noting the rank of especially worthy ’70s films in the horror pantheon of decades following). Section Three contains a conclusion and these five appendices: horror film clichés of the 1970s, frequently appearing performers, memorable movie ads, recommended films that illustrate how 1970s horror films continue to impact the industry, and the 15 best genre films of the decade as chosen by Muir.
Posted in Performing Arts