Harpers's Weekly 1864 Part 1

Civil War (1861-1865) Illustrations – Series 1864 Part 1 Featuring Warrenton, Fauquier County, Virginia and Beyond

Author: Walt H. Sirene

Publisher: Walt H. Sirene

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 122

View: 939

This is a selective collection of Harper’s Weekly woodcut Civil War images appearing during early 1864, along with the original descriptions of illustrations. The focus is Warrenton town and Fauquier County Virginia, and beyond. About This Document -- Several years ago, Fauquier resident Paul Mellon kindly gifted a collection of Harper’s Weekly news magazines to the Fauquier Historical Society. They are a great educational source of engraved images highlighting Civil War events published when most newspapers were only words. The images illuminate the story. Harper’s artists were busy making on-scene images for woodcut engravings including many of Warrenton, Fauquier County and nearby environs in Northern Virginia. Warrenton, the county seat, was of military importance as a commercial crossroads including a railroad branch line terminus. It changed occupiers sixty-seven times during the War. It was the hub for Confederate Col. John S Mosby’s partisan raiders who were citizens by day and raiders at night. With daring raids they strategically kept the Union’s Army of the Potomac bottled up in Northern Virginia protecting /repairing supply lines and Washington DC. Fauquier was also home to many enslaved, about 48% of the population at the beginning of the War. The images are in high resolution and were digitally enhanced to give readers, students and researchers clarity.
Posted in History

Custer's Trials

A Life on the Frontier of a New America

Author: T.J. Stiles

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 1101875844

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 608

View: 6914

Winner of the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for History From the winner of two Pulitzer Prizes and a National Book Award, a brilliant biography of Gen. George Armstrong Custer that radically changes our view of the man and his turbulent times. In this magisterial biography, T. J. Stiles paints a portrait of Custer both deeply personal and sweeping in scope, proving how much of Custer’s legacy has been ignored. He demolishes Custer’s historical caricature, revealing a volatile, contradictory, intense person—capable yet insecure, intelligent yet bigoted, passionate yet self-destructive, a romantic individualist at odds with the institution of the military (he was court-martialed twice in six years). The key to understanding Custer, Stiles writes, is keeping in mind that he lived on a frontier in time. In the Civil War, the West, and many areas overlooked in previous biographies, Custer helped to create modern America, but he could never adapt to it. He freed countless slaves yet rejected new civil rights laws. He proved his heroism but missed the dark reality of war for so many others. A talented combat leader, he struggled as a manager in the West. He tried to make a fortune on Wall Street yet never connected with the new corporate economy. Native Americans fascinated him, but he could not see them as fully human. A popular writer, he remained apart from Ambrose Bierce, Mark Twain, and other rising intellectuals. During Custer’s lifetime, Americans saw their world remade. His admirers saw him as the embodiment of the nation’s gallant youth, of all that they were losing; his detractors despised him for resisting a more complex and promising future. Intimate, dramatic, and provocative, this biography captures the larger story of the changing nation in Custer’s tumultuous marriage to his highly educated wife, Libbie; their complicated relationship with Eliza Brown, the forceful black woman who ran their household; as well as his battles and expeditions. It casts surprising new light on a near-mythic American figure, a man both widely known and little understood. From the Hardcover edition.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

Harper's Weekly

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: United States

Page: N.A

View: 4955

Posted in United States

The Great Missouri Raid

Sterling Price and the Last Major Confederate Campaign in Northern Territory

Author: Michael J. Forsyth

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 0786476958

Category: History

Page: 292

View: 6359

In 1864, General Sterling Price with an army of 12,000 ragtag Confederates invaded Missouri in an effort to wrest it from the United States Army's Department of Missouri. Price hoped his campaign would sway the 1864 presidential election, convincing war-weary Northern voters to cast their ballots for a peace candidate rather than Abraham Lincoln. It was the South's last invasion of Northern territory. But it was simply too late in the war for the South to achieve such an outcome, and Price grossly mismanaged the campaign, guaranteeing the defeat of his force and of the Confederate States. This book chronicles the Confederacy's desperate, final, ill-fated attempt to win a decisive victory.
Posted in History

The Harp and the Eagle

Irish-American Volunteers and the Union Army, 1861-1865

Author: Susannah Ural Bruce,Susannah J. Ural

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814799390

Category: History

Page: 309

View: 8984

On the eve of the Civil War, the Irish were one of America's largest ethnic groups, and approximately 150,000 fought for the Union. Analyzing letters and diaries written by soldiers and civilians; military, church, and diplomatic records; and community newspapers, Susannah Ural Bruce significantly expands the story of Irish-American Catholics in the Civil War, and reveals a complex picture of those who fought for the Union. While the population was diverse, many Irish Americans had dual loyalties to the U.S. and Ireland, which influenced their decisions to volunteer, fight, or end their military service. When the Union cause supported their interests in Ireland and America, large numbers of Irish Americans enlisted. However, as the war progressed, the Emancipation Proclamation, federal draft, and sharp rise in casualties caused Irish Americans to question—and sometimes abandon—the war effort because they viewed such changes as detrimental to their families and futures in America and Ireland. By recognizing these competing and often fluid loyalties, The Harp and the Eagle sheds new light on the relationship between Irish-American volunteers and the Union Army, and how the Irish made sense of both the Civil War and their loyalty to the United States.
Posted in History

The Publishers Weekly

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: American literature

Page: N.A

View: 7073

Posted in American literature

Battle Hymns

The Power and Popularity of Music in the Civil War

Author: Christian McWhirter

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807882623

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 1002

Music was everywhere during the Civil War. Tunes could be heard ringing out from parlor pianos, thundering at political rallies, and setting the rhythms of military and domestic life. With literacy still limited, music was an important vehicle for communicating ideas about the war, and it had a lasting impact in the decades that followed. Drawing on an array of published and archival sources, Christian McWhirter analyzes the myriad ways music influenced popular culture in the years surrounding the war and discusses its deep resonance for both whites and blacks, South and North. Though published songs of the time have long been catalogued and appreciated, McWhirter is the first to explore what Americans actually said and did with these pieces. By gauging the popularity of the most prominent songs and examining how Americans used them, McWhirter returns music to its central place in American life during the nation's greatest crisis. The result is a portrait of a war fought to music.
Posted in History

In the Presence of Mine Enemies: The Civil War in the Heart of America, 1859-1864

Author: Edward L. Ayers

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393247430

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 6940

Winner of the Bancroft Prize: Through a gripping narrative based on massive new research, a leading historian reshapes our understanding of the Civil War. Our standard Civil War histories tell a reassuring story of the triumph, in an inevitable conflict, of the dynamic, free-labor North over the traditional, slave-based South, vindicating the freedom principles built into the nation's foundations. But at the time, on the borderlands of Pennsylvania and Virginia, no one expected war, and no one knew how it would turn out. The one certainty was that any war between the states would be fought in their fields and streets. Edward L. Ayers gives us a different Civil War, built on an intimate scale. He charts the descent into war in the Great Valley spanning Pennsylvania and Virginia. Connected by strong ties of every kind, including the tendrils of slavery, the people of this borderland sought alternatives to secession and war. When none remained, they took up war with startling intensity. As this book relays with a vivid immediacy, it came to their doorsteps in hunger, disease, and measureless death. Ayers's Civil War emerges from the lives of everyday people as well as those who helped shape history—John Brown and Frederick Douglass, Lincoln, Jackson, and Lee. His story ends with the valley ravaged, Lincoln's support fragmenting, and Confederate forces massing for a battle at Gettysburg.
Posted in History

New Serial Titles

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Periodicals

Page: N.A

View: 7023

Posted in Periodicals

Andrew Johnson and Reconstruction

Author: Eric L. McKitrick

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0195057074

Category: Computers

Page: 533

View: 2114

An essential work on the Civil War period, this classic of Reconstruction scholarship challenges the longstanding myth of Andrew Johnson as misunderstood statesman, revealing him as a small-minded, vindictive, and stubborn man, whose rigid determination to defy Northern majority opinion thwarted the post-war reunion of North and South.
Posted in Computers

Presidential Campaigns

From George Washington to George W. Bush

Author: Paul F. Boller Jr.

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780198037378

Category: Political Science

Page: 496

View: 7148

Were presidential campaigns always as bitter as they have been in recent years? Or is the current style of campaigning a new political development? In this revised and updated edition of Presidential Campaigns the answers to these questions are clear: the race for the presidency, although at times mean and nasty, has always been an endlessly entertaining and highly-charged spectacle for the American public. This book unveils the whole history of American presidential elections, from the seamless ascent of General George Washington to the bitterly contested election of George W. Bush, bringing these boisterous contests to life in all their richness and complexity. In the old days, Boller shows, campaigns were much rowdier than they are today. Back in the nineteenth century, the invective at election time was exuberant and the mudslinging unrestrained; a candidate might be called everything from a carbuncle-faced old drunkard to a howling atheist. But there was plenty of fun and games, too, with songs and slogans, speeches and parades, all livening up the scene in order to get people to the polls.Presidential Campaigns takes note of the serious side of elections even as it documents the frenzy, frolic and the sleaze. Each chapter contains a brief essay describing an election and presenting "campaign highlights" that bring to life the quadrennial confrontation in all its shame and glory. With a postscript analyzing the major changes in the ways Americans have chosen their Presidents from Washington's time to the present, Presidential Campaigns gives the reader a full picture of this somewhat flawed procedure. For all of its shortcomings, though, this "great American shindig" is an essential part of the American democratic system and, for better or for worse, tells us much about ourselves.
Posted in Political Science

Fateful Lightning

A New History of the Civil War and Reconstruction

Author: Allen C. Guelzo

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199939365

Category: History

Page: 592

View: 5043

The Civil War is the greatest trauma ever experienced by the American nation, a four-year paroxysm of violence that left in its wake more than 600,000 dead, more than 2 million refugees, and the destruction (in modern dollars) of more than $700 billion in property. The war also sparked some of the most heroic moments in American history and enshrined a galaxy of American heroes. Above all, it permanently ended the practice of slavery and proved, in an age of resurgent monarchies, that a liberal democracy could survive the most frightful of challenges. In Fateful Lightning, two-time Lincoln Prize-winning historian Allen C. Guelzo offers a marvelous portrait of the Civil War and its era, covering not only the major figures and epic battles, but also politics, religion, gender, race, diplomacy, and technology. And unlike other surveys of the Civil War era, it extends the reader's vista to include the postwar Reconstruction period and discusses the modern-day legacy of the Civil War in American literature and popular culture. Guelzo also puts the conflict in a global perspective, underscoring Americans' acute sense of the vulnerability of their republic in a world of monarchies. He examines the strategy, the tactics, and especially the logistics of the Civil War and brings the most recent historical thinking to bear on emancipation, the presidency and the war powers, the blockade and international law, and the role of intellectuals, North and South. Written by a leading authority on our nation's most searing crisis, Fateful Lightning offers a vivid and original account of an event whose echoes continue with Americans to this day.
Posted in History

The Smell of Battle, the Taste of Siege

A Sensory History of the Civil War

Author: Mark M. Smith

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199322635

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 6263

Historical accounts of major events have almost always relied upon what those who were there witnessed. Nowhere is this truer than in the nerve-shattering chaos of warfare, where sight seems to confer objective truth and acts as the basis of reconstruction. In The Smell of Battle, the Taste of Siege, historian Mark M. Smith considers how all five senses, including sight, shaped the experience of the Civil War and thus its memory, exploring its full sensory impact on everyone from the soldiers on the field to the civilians waiting at home. From the eardrum-shattering barrage of shells announcing the outbreak of war at Fort Sumter; to the stench produced by the corpses lying in the mid-summer sun at Gettysburg; to the siege of Vicksburg, once a center of Southern culinary aesthetics and starved into submission, Smith recreates how Civil War was felt and lived. Relying on first-hand accounts, Smith focuses on specific senses, one for each event, offering a wholly new perspective. At Bull Run, the similarities between the colors of the Union and Confederate uniforms created concern over what later would be called "friendly fire" and helped decide the outcome of the first major battle, simply because no one was quite sure they could believe their eyes. He evokes what it might have felt like to be in the HL Hunley submarine, in which eight men worked cheek by jowl in near-total darkness in a space 48 inches high, 42 inches wide. Often argued to be the first "total war," the Civil War overwhelmed the senses because of its unprecedented nature and scope, rendering sight less reliable and, Smith shows, forcefully engaging the nonvisual senses. Sherman's March was little less than a full-blown assault on Southern sense and sensibility, leaving nothing untouched and no one unaffected. Unique, compelling, and fascinating, The Smell of Battle, The Taste of Siege, offers readers way to experience the Civil War with fresh eyes.
Posted in History

Lob des Müßiggangs

Author: Bertrand Russell

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9783423308519

Category:

Page: 257

View: 6015

Der Philosoph, Sozialkritiker und Nobelpreisträger Bertrand Russell behandelt in 15 Aufsätzen und Glossen eine Vielfalt an Themen. Das Spektrum reicht von den Vorteilen des Müßiggangs über soziale Aspekte der Architektur, 'unnützes Wissen', die Licht- und Schattenseiten von Kapitalismus, Faschismus, Kommunismus bis zu der Frage 'Was ist die Seele?' oder das Verhältnis von Menschen und Insekten. Obwohl diese Betrachtungen erstmals 1957 erschienen, sind sie doch von überraschender Aktualität, etwa bezüglich des globalen Kapitalismus, Fragen der Erziehung oder des Verhältnisses von Arbeit und Freizeit. Mit Witz und Scharfsinn argumentiert Russell für die Notwendigkeit einer geistigen Unvoreingenommenheit und die Bereitschaft, dogmatische Auffassungen immer wieder kritisch zu hinterfragen.
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John Charles Fremont

Character As Destiny

Author: Andrew F. Rolle

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN: 9780806131351

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 272

View: 7499

As an explorer, John Charles Frémont led five expeditions into the American West--two of them disastrous. He was also one of California’s first two senators (1850), America’s first Republican candidate for president (1856), a Civil War general, and the territorial governor of Arizona (1878-83). But his life was one of rash and rebellious conduct against authority. During the Mexican War he claimed to be the military governor of California, which resulted in a court-martial in 1848. At the outbreak of the Civil War he reentered the army as one of four major generals, outranking even Ulysses S. Grant. However, when he antagonized President Abraham Lincoln by issuing his own emancipation proclamation in advance of the president’s, Lincoln relieved him of command. In this comprehensive biography, Andrew Rolle carefully examines the historical record with a psychobiographical approach that explores and explains the many irrationalities of Frémont’s character.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

American Phoenix

The Remarkable Story of William Skinner, A Man Who Turned Disaster Into Destiny

Author: Sarah S. Kilborne

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1451671814

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 5954

The incredible story of nineteenth-century millionaire William Skinner, a leading founder of the American silk industry, who lost everything in a devastating flood—and his improbable, inspiring comeback to the pinnacle of the business world. In 1845 a young, penniless William Skinner sailed in steerage class on a boat that took him from the slums of London to the United States. Endowed with rare knowledge in the art of dyeing and an uncanny business sense, he acquired work in a fledgling silk mill in Massachusetts, quickly rising to prominence in the nation’s new luxury industry. Soon he opened his own factory and began turning out one of the bestselling silk brands in the country. Skinner was lauded as a pioneer in the textile industry and a manufacturer who knew no such word as fail. His business grew to sustain a bustling community filled with men, women, and children, living and working in the mill village of “Skinner-ville,” producing the country’s most glamorous, fashionable thread. Then, in 1874, disaster struck. Hundreds of millions of gallons of water burst through a nearby dam, destroying everything in its path, including Skinnerville. Within fifteen minutes, Skinner’s entire life’s work was swept away, and he found himself one of the central figures in the worst industrial disaster the nation had yet known. In this gripping narrative history, Skinner’s great-great-granddaughter, Sarah S. Kilborne, tells an inspiring, unforgettable American story—of a town devastated by unimaginable catastrophe; an industry that had no reason to succeed except for the perseverance of a few intrepid entrepreneurs; and a man who had nothing—and everything—to lose as he struggled—and succeeded— to rebuild his life for a second time. American Phoenix offers a new twist on the American dream, reminding us that just when we thought the dream was over, it may have only just begun.
Posted in History

USA Texas Mittlerer Westen

Author: N.A

Publisher: Iwanowski´s Reisebuchverlag

ISBN: 9783861970149

Category:

Page: 476

View: 2988

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Lincoln and the Jews

A History

Author: Jonathan D. Sarna,Benjamin Shapell

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 1466864613

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 533

One hundred and fifty years after Abraham Lincoln's death, the full story of his extraordinary relationship with Jews is told here for the first time. Lincoln and the Jews: A History provides readers both with a captivating narrative of his interactions with Jews, and with the opportunity to immerse themselves in rare manuscripts and images, many from the Shapell Lincoln Collection, that show Lincoln in a way he has never been seen before. Lincoln's lifetime coincided with the emergence of Jews on the national scene in the United States. When he was born, in 1809, scarcely 3,000 Jews lived in the entire country. By the time of his assassination in 1865, large-scale immigration, principally from central Europe, had brought that number up to more than 150,000. Many Americans, including members of Lincoln's cabinet and many of his top generals during the Civil War, were alarmed by this development and treated Jews as second-class citizens and religious outsiders. Lincoln, this book shows, exhibited precisely the opposite tendency. He also expressed a uniquely deep knowledge of the Old Testament, employing its language and concepts in some of his most important writings. He befriended Jews from a young age, promoted Jewish equality, appointed numerous Jews to public office, had Jewish advisors and supporters starting already from the early 1850s, as well as later during his two presidential campaigns, and in response to Jewish sensitivities, even changed the way he thought and spoke about America. Through his actions and his rhetoric—replacing "Christian nation," for example, with "this nation under God"—he embraced Jews as insiders. In this groundbreaking work, the product of meticulous research, historian Jonathan D. Sarna and collector Benjamin Shapell reveal how Lincoln's remarkable relationship with American Jews impacted both his path to the presidency and his policy decisions as president. The volume uncovers a new and previously unknown feature of Abraham Lincoln's life, one that broadened him, and, as a result, broadened America.
Posted in History

A History of American Magazines, 1850-1865

Author: Frank Luther Mott

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674395510

Category: Antiques & Collectibles

Page: 646

View: 4379

Posted in Antiques & Collectibles