Harper's Weekly 1863

Civil War (1861-1865) Illustrations – Series 1863 Featuring Warrenton, Fauquier County, Virginia and beyond

Author: Walt H. Sirene

Publisher: Walt H. Sirene

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 151

View: 3145

This is a selective collection of Harper’s Weekly woodcut Civil War images appearing during 1863, along with the original descriptions of illustrations. The focus is Warrenton town and Fauquier County Virginia, and beyond. About This Document -- Several years ago, Fauquier resident Paul Mellon kindly gifted a collection of Harper’s Weekly news magazines to the Fauquier Historical Society. They are a great educational source of engraved images highlighting Civil War events published when most newspapers were only words. The images illuminate the War's story. Harper’s artists were busy making on-scene images for woodcut engravings including many of Warrenton, Fauquier County and nearby environs in Northern Virginia. Warrenton, the county seat, was of military importance as a commercial crossroads including a railroad branch line terminus. It changed occupiers sixty-seven times during the War. It was the hub for Confederate Col. John S Mosby’s partisan raiders who were citizens by day and raiders at night. With daring raids they strategically kept the Union’s Army of the Potomac bottled up in Northern Virginia protecting and repairing supply lines and Washington DC. Fauquier was also home to many enslaved, about 48% of the Fauquier County population at the beginning of the War. The images are in high resolution and were digitally enhanced to give readers, students and researchers clarity.
Posted in History

Seeking a Voice

Images of Race and Gender in the 19th Century Press

Author: David B. Sachsman,S. Kittrell Rushing,Roy Morris

Publisher: Purdue University Press

ISBN: 9781557535054

Category: History

Page: 347

View: 1913

This volume chronicles the media's role in reshaping American life during the tumultuous nineteenth century by focusing specifically on the presentation of race and gender in the newspapers and magazines of the time. The work is divided into four parts: Part I, "Race Reporting," details the various ways in which America's racial minorities were portrayed; Part II, "Fires of Discontent," looks at the moral and religious opposition to slavery by the abolitionist movement and demonstrates how that opposition was echoed by African Americans themselves; Part III, "The Cult of True Womanhood," examines the often disparate ways in which American women were portrayed in the national media as they assumed a greater role in public and private life; and Part IV, "Transcending the Boundaries," traces the lives of pioneering women journalists who sought to alter and expand their gender's participation in American life, showing how the changing role of women led to various journalistic attempts to depict and define women through sensationalistic news coverage of female crime stories.
Posted in History

Engraved Prints of Texas

1554 - 1900

Author: Mavis Parrott Kelsey,Robin Brandt Hutchison

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 9781585442706

Category: Art

Page: 478

View: 1481

For centuries Texas has fired the imagination of artists as well as explorers and settlers. Before modern photography, engravings were the principal type of illustration used by artists to portray images of the state. Now, in this extensive catalogue, authors Mavis P. Kelsey Sr., and Robin Brandt Hutchison have surveyed all engraved illustrations about Texas published before 1900. Engraved Prints of Texas, 1554–1900 presents the whole range of early Texas history as portrayed in published engravings: from the first printed representation of a buffalo in 1554 to a 1900 view of the University of Texas Medical School in Galveston. Entries include information on more than 2000 engravings, 470 of which are illustrated in this volume. Presented chronologically by century and decade of publication, each chapter features a brief introduction to the historical background of the era, highlighting key illustrations and placing the art within the context of major events of the period. Several topical discussions address subjects that span decades or recur as pervasive themes in illustration. Historians, teachers, and scholars will find this catalogue a useful reference for locating pictorial representations of particular events, subjects, or persons. It is an indispensable source for lovers of Texas history and an important contribution to preserving the visual record.
Posted in Art

The Imagined Civil War

Popular Literature of the North & South, 1861-1865

Author: Alice Fahs

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807854631

Category: History

Page: 424

View: 4231

Alice Fahs explores a little-known and fascinating side of the Civil War - the outpouring of popular literature inspired by the conflict. From 1861 to 1865, authors and publishers in both the North and the South produced a remarkable variety of war-related compositions, including poems, songs, children's stories, romances, novels, histories, and even humorous pieces. Fahs mines these rich but long-neglected resources to recover the diversity of the war's political and social meanings. Instead of narrowly portraying the Civil War as a clash between two great, white armies, popular literature offered a wide range of representations through which to consider the conflict, as Fahs demonstrates. Works that explored the war's devastating impact on white women's lives, for example, proclaimed the importance of their experiences on the home front, while popular writings that celebrated black manhood and heroism in the wake of emancipation helped readers begin to imagine new roles for blacks in American life. By providing subjects and characters with which a broad spectrum of people could identify, popular literature invited ordinary Americans to envision themselves as active participants in the war and helped shape new modes of imagining the relationships of diverse individuals to the nation.
Posted in History

Harper's Weekly

Author: John Bonner,George William Curtis,Henry Mills Alden,Samuel Stillman Conant,Montgomery Schuyler,John Foord,Richard Harding Davis,Carl Schurz,Henry Loomis Nelson,John Kendrick Bangs,George Brinton McClellan Harvey,Norman Hapgood

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: United States

Page: N.A

View: 3089

Posted in United States

To Live and Die

Collected Stories of the Civil War, 1861–1876

Author: Kathleen Diffley,Kathleen Elizabeth Diffley

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822334392

Category: Fiction

Page: 448

View: 3715

The editor collects thirty-one stories from popular magazines depicting the horrors found on the battlefields and in the field hospitals of America's bloodiest war, including works by Louisa May Alcott, Mark Twain, and Henry King.
Posted in Fiction

Harpers Weekly

A Journal of Civilization

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: United States

Page: N.A

View: 5729

Posted in United States

The Civil War: The Third Year Told by Those Who Lived It

(Library of America #234)

Author: Brooks D. Simpson

Publisher: Library of America

ISBN: 1598532618

Category: History

Page: 936

View: 7208

This is the third volume of the ground-breaking eyewitness narrative that has been called a "masterpiece." Spanning the crucial months from January 1863 to March 1864, this third volume of The Library of America’s highly acclaimed four volume series presents an incomparable portrait of a nation at war with itself while illuminating the military and political events that brought the Union closer to victory and slavery closer to destruction. It brings together more than 140 contemporary letters, diary entries, speeches, articles, messages, and poems by more than eighty participants and observers, among them Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, William T. Sherman, Robert E. Lee, Frederick Douglass, Walt Whitman, Herman Melville, Mary Chesnut, Clement Vallandigham, Henry Adams, Charlotte Forten, Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, and George Templeton Strong, as well as Union officers Robert Gould Shaw, Charles B. Haydon, and Henry Livermore Abbott; Confederate diarists Catherine Edmondston, Kate Stone, and Judith McGuire; and Alabama soldier Samuel Pickens, Iowa housewife Catharine Peirce, Kentucky preacher George Richard Browder, and Kansas clergyman Richard Cordley. The selections include vivid and haunting eyewitness narratives of some of the war’s most famous battles—Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Vicksburg, Fort Wagner, Chickamauga, Chattanooga—as well as firsthand accounts of the merciless guerrilla war in Missouri and Kansas; the Richmond bread riot and the New York draft riots; the controversies surrounding the use of black soldiers and the Lincoln administration’s curtailment of civil liberties; and the struggles of civilians both black and white to survive increasingly harsh wartime conditions. Each volume features a detailed chronology of events, biographical notes about the writers, textual and explanatory notes, and original hand-drawn endpaper maps by expert Civil War cartographer Earl McElfresh. The Civil War: The Final Year Told by Those Who Lived It will be published in 2014.
Posted in History

Lincoln in caricature

165 poster cartoons and drawings for the press

Author: Rufus Rockwell Wilson

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: 331

View: 1032

Posted in

In the Presence of Mine Enemies: The Civil War in the Heart of America, 1859-1864

Author: Edward L. Ayers

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393247430

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 9945

Winner of the Bancroft Prize: Through a gripping narrative based on massive new research, a leading historian reshapes our understanding of the Civil War. Our standard Civil War histories tell a reassuring story of the triumph, in an inevitable conflict, of the dynamic, free-labor North over the traditional, slave-based South, vindicating the freedom principles built into the nation's foundations. But at the time, on the borderlands of Pennsylvania and Virginia, no one expected war, and no one knew how it would turn out. The one certainty was that any war between the states would be fought in their fields and streets. Edward L. Ayers gives us a different Civil War, built on an intimate scale. He charts the descent into war in the Great Valley spanning Pennsylvania and Virginia. Connected by strong ties of every kind, including the tendrils of slavery, the people of this borderland sought alternatives to secession and war. When none remained, they took up war with startling intensity. As this book relays with a vivid immediacy, it came to their doorsteps in hunger, disease, and measureless death. Ayers's Civil War emerges from the lives of everyday people as well as those who helped shape history—John Brown and Frederick Douglass, Lincoln, Jackson, and Lee. His story ends with the valley ravaged, Lincoln's support fragmenting, and Confederate forces massing for a battle at Gettysburg.
Posted in History

Faking it

Manipulated Photography Before Photoshop

Author: Mia Fineman,National Gallery of Art (U.S.),Museum of Fine Arts, Houston

Publisher: Metropolitan Museum of Art

ISBN: 1588394735

Category: Photography

Page: 280

View: 2568

This catalogue is published in conjunction with Faking It: Manipulated Photography before Photoshop, on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, from October 11, 2012, through January 27, 2013; at The National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., from February 17 through May 5, 2013; and at The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston from June 2 through August 25, 2013.
Posted in Photography

Journal of the Civil War Era

Fall 2012 Issue

Author: William A. Blair

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 0807852651

Category: History

Page: 176

View: 4425

The Journal of the Civil War Era Volume 2, Number 3 September 2012 TABLE OF CONTENTS Articles Robert Fortenbaugh Memorial Lecture Joan Waugh "I Only Knew What Was in My Mind": Ulysses S. Grant and the Meaning of Appomattox Patrick Kelly The North American Crisis of the 1860s Carole Emberton "Only Murder Makes Men": Reconsidering the Black Military Experience Caroline E. Janney "I Yield to No Man an Iota of My Convictions": Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park and the Limits of Reconciliation Book Reviews Books Received Review Essay David S. Reynolds Reading the Sesquicentennial: New Directions in the Popular History of the Civil War Notes on Contributors The Journal of the Civil War Era takes advantage of the flowering of research on the many issues raised by the sectional crisis, war, Reconstruction, and memory of the conflict, while bringing fresh understanding to the struggles that defined the period, and by extension, the course of American history in the nineteenth century.
Posted in History

Early Tales & Sketches, Vol. 2

1864 -1865

Author: Mark Twain

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520906778

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 769

View: 1540

From the Introduction: The second volume of this collection follows Clemens from his first days as a resident journalist in California, late in May 1864, through the end of his first full year as a California resident, 1865. In this twenty-month period he wrote most of his work for the San Francisco "Golden Era," the "Morning Call," the "Dramatic Chronicle," and the "Californian." He began to publish somewhat more regularly in eastern journals, like the "New York Saturday Press" and the "Weekly Review," and toward the end of the period he started a long assignment as the daily correspondent from San Francisco to the Virginia City "Territorial Enterprise." In November 1865 he published "Jim Smiley and His Jumping Frog" [no. 119] and by the beginning of 1866 the news of its success with eastern readers had begun to filter back to California. He was on the verge of national and international fame as a humorist.
Posted in Literary Criticism

Year of Desperate Struggle

Jeb Stuart and His Cavalry, from Gettysburg to Yellow Tavern, 1863-1864

Author: Monte Akers

Publisher: Casemate

ISBN: 161200282X

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 5526

By the summer of 1863, following Chancellorsville, it was clear to everyone on both sides of the Civil War that the Army of Northern Virginia was the most formidable force Americans had ever put in the field. It could only be ÒtiedÓ in battle, if against great odds, but would more usually vanquish its opponents. A huge measure of that armyÕs success was attributable to its cavalry arm, under Major General J.E.B. Stuart, which had literally Òrun ringsÓ around its enemies. But Northern arithmetic and expertise were gradually catching up. In this work, the sequel to his acclaimed Year of Glory, author Monte Akers tracks Stuart and his cavalry through the following year of the war, from Gettysburg to the Overland Campaign, concluding only when Jeb himself succumbs to a gunshot while fending off a force three times his size at the very gates of Richmond. Gettysburg put paid to the aura of unstoppable victory surrounding the Army of Northern Virginia. But when Grant and Sheridan came east they found that Lee, Stuart, Longstreet, and the rest still refused to be defeated. It was a year of grim casualties and ferocious fightingÑin short, a year of Òdesperate struggleÓ with the gloves off on both sides. This work picks up where Year of Glory left off, with a minute examination of StuartÕs cavalry during the controversial Gettysburg campaign, followed by the nine months of sparring during which the Army of Potomac declined to undertake further major thrusts against Virginia. But then the UnionÕs western chieftains arrived and the war became one huge Òfuneral procession,Ó as Grant and Sheridan found that their prior victories had by no means prepared them for meeting the Army of Northern Virginia. In this work Akers provides a fascinating, close-in view of the ConfederacyÕs cavalry arm during this crucial period of the war. After StuartÕs death the Army of Northern Virginia would eventually be cornered, but while he was alive it was often the Northerners who most needed to look to their security.
Posted in History

Chancellorsville

The Battle and Its Aftermath

Author: Gary W. Gallagher

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 0807835900

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 6843

A variety of important but lesser-known dimensions of the Chancellorsville campaign of spring 1863 are explored in this collection of eight original essays. Departing from the traditional focus on generalship and tactics, the contributors address the campaign's broad context and implications and revisit specific battlefield episodes that have in the past been poorly understood. Chancellorsville was a remarkable victory for Robert E. Lee's troops, a fact that had enormous psychological importance for both sides, which had met recently at Fredericksburg and would meet again at Gettysburg in just two months. But the achievement, while stunning, came at an enormous cost: more than 13,000 Confederates became casualties, including Stonewall Jackson, who was wounded by friendly fire and died several days later. The topics covered in this volume include the influence of politics on the Union army, the importance of courage among officers, the impact of the war on children, and the state of battlefield medical care. Other essays illuminate the important but overlooked role of Confederate commander Jubal Early, reassess the professionalism of the Union cavalry, investigate the incident of friendly fire that took Stonewall Jackson's life, and analyze the military and political background of Confederate colonel Emory Best's court-martial on charges of abandoning his men. Contributors Keith S. Bohannon, Pennsylvania State University and Greenville, South Carolina Gary W. Gallagher, University of Virginia A. Wilson Greene, Petersburg, Virginia John J. Hennessy, Fredericksburg, Virginia Robert K. Krick, Fredericksburg, Virginia James Marten, Marquette University Carol Reardon, Pennsylvania State University James I. Robertson Jr., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
Posted in History

Lincolnites and Rebels

A Divided Town in the American Civil War

Author: Robert Tracy McKenzie

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199884714

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 7662

At the start of the Civil War, Knoxville, Tennessee, with a population of just over 4,000, was considered a prosperous metropolis little reliant on slavery. Although the surrounding countryside was predominantly Unionist in sympathy, Knoxville itself was split down the middle, with Union and Confederate supporters even holding simultaneous political rallies at opposite ends of the town's main street. Following Tennessee's secession, Knoxville soon became famous (or infamous) as a stronghold of stalwart Unionism, thanks to the efforts of a small cadre who persisted in openly denouncing the Confederacy. Throughout the course of the Civil War, Knoxville endured military occupation for all but three days, hosting Confederate troops during the first half of the conflict and Union forces throughout the remainder, with the transition punctuated by an extended siege and bloody battle during which nearly forty thousand soldiers fought over the town. In Lincolnites and Rebels, Robert Tracy McKenzie tells the story of Civil War Knoxville-a perpetually occupied, bitterly divided Southern town where neighbor fought against neighbor. Mining a treasure-trove of manuscript collections and civil and military records, McKenzie reveals the complex ways in which allegiance altered the daily routine of a town gripped in a civil war within the Civil War and explores the agonizing personal decisions that war made inescapable. Following the course of events leading up to the war, occupation by Confederate and then Union soldiers, and the troubled peace that followed the war, Lincolnites and Rebels details in microcosm the conflict and paints a complex portrait of a border state, neither wholly North nor South.
Posted in History

Battle Hymns

The Power and Popularity of Music in the Civil War

Author: Christian McWhirter

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807882623

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 6280

Music was everywhere during the Civil War. Tunes could be heard ringing out from parlor pianos, thundering at political rallies, and setting the rhythms of military and domestic life. With literacy still limited, music was an important vehicle for communicating ideas about the war, and it had a lasting impact in the decades that followed. Drawing on an array of published and archival sources, Christian McWhirter analyzes the myriad ways music influenced popular culture in the years surrounding the war and discusses its deep resonance for both whites and blacks, South and North. Though published songs of the time have long been catalogued and appreciated, McWhirter is the first to explore what Americans actually said and did with these pieces. By gauging the popularity of the most prominent songs and examining how Americans used them, McWhirter returns music to its central place in American life during the nation's greatest crisis. The result is a portrait of a war fought to music.
Posted in History