Genesee Farmer

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Agriculture

Page: N.A

View: 5311

Posted in Agriculture

The Genesee Farmer

A Monthly Journal Devoted to Agriculture & Horticulture, Domestic and Rural Economy ...

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Agriculture

Page: N.A

View: 4312

Posted in Agriculture

The Monthly Genesee Farmer

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Agriculture

Page: N.A

View: 9950

Posted in Agriculture

Genesee Farmer

Author: Daniel Lee,James Vick

Publisher: BiblioBazaar, LLC

ISBN: 9781115747783

Category: History

Page: 388

View: 2792

This is a pre-1923 historical reproduction that was curated for quality. Quality assurance was conducted on each of these books in an attempt to remove books with imperfections introduced by the digitization process. Though we have made best efforts - the books may have occasional errors that do not impede the reading experience. We believe this work is culturally important and have elected to bring the book back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide.
Posted in History

American Husbandry

Being a Series of Essays on Agriculture. Comp. Principally from "The Cultivator" and "The Genesee Farmer."

Author: Willis Gaylord,Luther Tucker

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Agriculture

Page: N.A

View: 6616

Posted in Agriculture

New England Farmer

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Agriculture

Page: N.A

View: 5661

Posted in Agriculture

Daniel Lee, Agriculturist

His Life North and South

Author: Coulter

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820335304

Category: History

Page: 176

View: 9873

Published in 1972, this biographical study examines Daniel Lee (1802–1890), an agriculturist who is considered to be a forefather to today's scientific farming. Lee dedicated himself the advancement of farming through the diversification of crops and the use of scientific methods. He was the editor of both the Genesse Farmer and the Southern Cultivator and wrote numerous articles about agricultural chemistry. Lee was appointed the first professor of agriculture at the University of Georgia, which solidified his importance in the agricultural world.
Posted in History

The Practical Farmer

Or Spirit of the Boston Cultivator, Containing a Collection of Valuable Essays, on Practical Agriculture, &c

Author: William Buckminster

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Agriculture

Page: 300

View: 9895

Posted in Agriculture

The American Farmer's Instructor, Or Practical Agriculturist

Comprehending the Cultivation of Plants, the Husbandry of the Domestic Animals, and the Economy of the Farm; Together with a Variety of Information which Will be Found Important to the Farmer

Author: Francis S. Wiggins

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Agriculture

Page: 504

View: 4611

Posted in Agriculture

Farmers' Register

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 9924

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The Burned-over District

The Social and Intellectual History of Enthusiastic Religion in Western New York, 1800–1850

Author: Whitney R. Cross

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 080147700X

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 3520

"Burned-over District was a name applied to a small region, during a limited period of history, to indicate a particular phase of development. It described the religious character of western New York during the first half of the nineteenth century. Time, subject, and area have thus all combined to confine the scope of this book. The study has nevertheless seemed rewarding, mainly because its implications transcend all three limitations. “The meaning expands in a geographical sense because this one area provides a case history in the westward transit of New England culture. Likewise, it is representative as a sample of the change from youth to maturity in a single section affected by continuing westward movement. The subject of religion has broader significance in this period and locality than might at first appear. This section was the storm center, and religious forces were the driving propellants of social movements important for the whole country in that generation. As far as time goes, this book is an illustration of the way in which the minds of one era help to form the destinies of succeeding generations. Neither the causes of the Civil War nor the origins of national prohibition, to cite only two prominent examples, can be thoroughly understood without reference to the Burned-over District."—from the Preface
Posted in History

American Pests

The Losing War on Insects from Colonial Times to DDT

Author: James E. McWilliams

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231511361

Category: Science

Page: 312

View: 7802

The world of insects is one we only dimly understand. Yet from using arsenic, cobalt, and quicksilver to kill household infiltrators to employing the sophisticated tools of the Orkin Man, Americans have fought to eradicate the "bugs" they have learned to hate. Inspired by the still-revolutionary theories of Rachel Carson's Silent Spring, James E. McWilliams argues for a more harmonious and rational approach to our relationship with insects, one that does not harm our environment and, consequently, ourselves along the way. Beginning with the early techniques of colonial farmers and ending with the modern use of chemical insecticides, McWilliams deftly shows how America's war on insects mirrors its continual struggle with nature, economic development, technology, and federal regulation. He reveals a very American paradox: the men and women who settled and developed this country sought to control the environment and achieve certain economic goals; yet their methods of agricultural expansion undermined their efforts and linked them even closer to the inexorable realities of the insect world. As told from the perspective of the often flamboyant actors in the battle against insects, American Pests is a fascinating investigation into the attitudes, policies, and practices that continue to influence our behavior toward insects. Asking us to question, if not abandon, our reckless (and sometimes futile) attempts at insect control, McWilliams convincingly argues that insects, like people, have an inherent right to exist and that in our attempt to rid ourselves of insects, we compromise the balance of nature.
Posted in Science