From the Romans to the Normans on the English Renaissance Stage

Author: Lisa Hopkins

Publisher: ISD LLC

ISBN: 1580442803

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 7118

This book examines the late sixteenth- and early seventeenth-century engagement with a crucial part of Britain's past, the period between the withdrawal of the Roman legions and the Norman Conquest. A number of early modern plays suggest an underlying continuity, an essential English identity linked to the land and impervious to change. This book considers the extent to which ideas about early modern English and British national, religious, and political identities were rooted in cultural constructions of the pre-Conquest past.
Posted in History

Shakespeare on the Edge

Border-crossing in the Tragedies and the Henriad

Author: Professor Lisa Hopkins

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 1409489566

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 162

View: 596

When Shakespeare's John of Gaunt refers to England as 'this sceptred isle', he glosses over a fact of which Shakespeare's original audience would have been acutely conscious, which was that England was not an island at all, but had land borders with Scotland and Wales. Together with the narrow channels separating the British mainland from Ireland and the Continent, these were the focus of acute, if intermittent, unease during the early modern period. This book analyses works by not only Shakespeare but also his contemporaries to argue that many of the plays of Shakespeare's central period, from the second tetralogy to Hamlet, King Lear, Macbeth, and Othello, engage with the idea of England's borders. But borders, it claims, are not only of geopolitical significance: in Shakespeare's imagination and indeed in that of his culture, eschatological overtones also accrue to the idea of the border. This is because the countries of the Celtic fringe were often discussed in terms of the supernatural and fairy lore and, in particular, the rivers which were often used as boundary markers were invested with heavily mythologized personae. Thus Hopkins shows that the idea of the border becomes a potent metaphor for exploring the spiritual uncertainties of the period, and for speculating on what happens in 'the undiscovered country, from whose bourn no traveller returns'. At the same time, the idea that a thing can only really be defined in terms of what lies beyond it provides a sharply interrogating charge for Shakespeare's use of metatheatre and for his suggestions of a world beyond the confines of his plays.
Posted in Literary Criticism

Dunmore and Fleischer's Medical Terminology

Exercises in Etymology

Author: Cheryl Walker-Esbaugh,Laine H McCarthy,Rhonda A Sparks

Publisher: F.A. Davis

ISBN: 0803629885

Category: Medical

Page: 301

View: 3335

This completely revised edition now includes the most current terminology. This unique text helps your students learn medical terminology from a "classics" approach and includes references to Greek and Latin mythology. In addition, many new illustrations reinforce concepts and highlight various etymological notes.
Posted in Medical

The Selected Plays of John Ford

The Broken Heart, 'Tis Pity She's a Whore, Perkin Warbeck

Author: John Ford,Colin Gibson

Publisher: CUP Archive

ISBN: 9780521295451

Category: Drama

Page: 356

View: 7172

This selection contains the three finest plays of the Stuart dramatist John Ford. The Broken Heart is a classical tragedy of suffering; 'Tis Pity She's a Whore, Ford's best-known play and one still frequently performed, is a tragic story of limitless ambition and social rivalry expressed in sexual terms; Perkin Warbeck is the last great successor to the history plays of Shakespeare. Together they exemplify the unique tone of Ford's drama, in which passion and gravity are united by a playwright with a poetic sense of theatre. This is the only one-volume selection of Ford's plays now available. The texts are modernised and equipped with notes explaining unfamiliar language and historical references. A general introduction gives a brief biography and bibliography; individual introductions deal with the sources and stage history of each play. Longer notes at the back of the book discuss points of staging and interpretation, and there is a full textual apparatus which makes this edition useful for the scholar as well as the student.
Posted in Drama

Britain and Poland-Lithuania

Contact and Comparison from the Middle Ages to 1795

Author: Richard Unger,Jakub Basista

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004166238

Category: History

Page: 486

View: 3708

Twenty-four papers deal with various aspects of the economies, politics, religion, art, and culture of Britain and Poland-Lithuania from the Middle Ages down to the Third Partition, illustrating unexpected similarities and long-standing ties between the two regions.
Posted in History

A Primer in Theatre History

From the Greeks to the Spanish Golden Age

Author: William Grange

Publisher: University Press of America

ISBN: 0761860045

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 176

View: 8836

Grange covers productions, theories, innovations, and plays from ancient Greece to the Spanish Golden Age. It does not read like a scholarly tome as its chapters allow the uninitiated reader access to well-researched and often humorous material. Descriptions of films augment discussions of theatre, helping readers better analyze theatre performance.
Posted in Performing Arts

The Crusades

Author: Mike Paine

Publisher: Oldcastle Books

ISBN: 184243652X

Category: History

Page: 160

View: 3423

The first crusade was set in motion by Pope Urban II in 1095 and culminated in the capture of Jerusalem from the Muslims four years later. In 1291 the fall of Acre marked the loss of the last Christian enclave in the Holy Land. This Pocket Essential traces the chronology of the Crusades between these two dates and highlights the most important figures on all sides of the conflict. It covers the creation of the kingdom of Jerusalem and the other crusader states and their struggle to survive. It looks at the successes and failures of the Third Crusade and at the legendary figures of Richard the Lionheart and Saladin, explores the truth and the myths behind the orders of military monks like the Hospitallers and examines such strange historical events as the Children's Crusade and the crusader sacking of Byzantium in 1204. It also looks at the struggles of the Teutonic Knights against paganism in the Baltic. The book provides the essential information about one of the great unifying, and disunifying, forces of medieval Christendom.
Posted in History

Medieval Schools

From Roman Britain to Renaissance England

Author: Nicholas Orme

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300111026

Category: Education

Page: 430

View: 6599

Children have gone to school in England since Roman times. By the end of the middle ages there were hundreds of schools, supporting a highly literate society. This book traces their history from the Romans to the Renaissance, showing how they developed, what they taught, how they were run, and who attended them. Every kind of school is covered, from reading schools in churches and town grammar schools to schools in monasteries and nunneries, business schools, and theological schools. The author also shows how they fitted into a constantly changing world, ending with the impacts of the Renaissance and the Reformation. Medieval schools anticipated nearly all the ideas, practices, and institutions of schooling today. Their remarkable successes in linguistic and literary work, organizational development, teaching large numbers of people shaped the societies that they served. Only by understanding what schools achieved can we fathom the nature of the middle ages.
Posted in Education

The Evolution of the Grand Tour

Anglo-Italian Cultural Relations since the Renaissance

Author: Edward Chaney

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317973666

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 9607

The Grand Tour has become a subject of major interest to scholars and general readers interested in exploring the historic connections between nations and their intellectual and artistic production. Although traditionally associated with the eighteenth century, when wealthy Englishmen would complete their education on the continent, the Grand Tour is here investigated in a wider context, from the decline of the Roman Empire to recent times. Authors from Chaucer to Erasmus came to mock the custom but even the Reformation did not stop the urge to travel. From the mid-sixteenth century, northern Europeans justified travel to the south in terms of education. The English had previously travelled to Italy to study the classics; now they travelled to learn Italian and study medicine, diplomacy, dancing, riding, fencing, and, eventually, art and architecture. Famous men, and an increasing proportion of women, all contributed to establishing a convention which eventually came to dominate European culture. Documenting the lives and travels of these personalities, Professor Chaney's remarkable book provides a complete picture of one of the most fascinating phenomena in the history of western civilisation.
Posted in History

The Castle of Otranto

A Gothic Story

Author: Horace Walpole

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191009628

Category: Fiction

Page: 176

View: 3250

'Look, my lord! See heaven itself declares against your impious intentions!' The Castle of Otranto (1764) is the first supernatural English novel and one of the most influential works of Gothic fiction. It inaugurated a literary genre that will be forever associated with the effects that Walpole pioneered. Professing to be a translation of a mysterious Italian tale from the darkest Middle Ages, the novel tells of Manfred, prince of Otranto, whose fear of an ancient prophecy sets him on a course of destruction. After the grotesque death of his only son, Conrad, on his wedding day, Manfred determines to marry the bride-to-be. The virgin Isabella flees through a castle riddled with secret passages. Chilling coincidences, ghostly visitations, arcane revelations, and violent combat combine in a heady mix that terrified the novel's first readers. In this new edition Nick Groom examines the reasons for its extraordinary impact and the Gothic culture from which it sprang. The Castle of Otranto was a game-changer, and Walpole the writer who paved the way for modern horror exponents. ABOUT THE SERIES: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the widest range of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, helpful notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.
Posted in Fiction

Renaissance Hybrids

Culture and Genre in Early Modern England

Author: Mr Gary A Schmidt

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 1472403967

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 254

View: 8047

In the first book-length study explicitly to connect the postcolonial trope of hybridity to Renaissance literature, Gary Schmidt examines how sixteenth- and seventeenth-century English authors, artists, explorers and statesmen exercised a concerted effort to frame questions of cultural and artistic heterogeneity. This book is unique in its exploration of how 'hybrid' literary genres emerge at particular historical moments as vehicles for negotiating other kinds of hybridity, including but not limited to cultural and political hybridity. In particular, Schmidt addresses three distinct manifestations of 'hybridity' in English literature and iconography during this period. The first category comprises literal hybrid creatures such as satyrs, centaurs, giants, and changelings; the second is cultural hybrids reflecting the mixed status of the nation; and the third is generic hybrids such as the Shakespearean 'problem play,' the volatile verse satires of Nashe, Hall and Marston, and the tragicomedies of Beaumont and Fletcher. In Renaissance Hybrids, Schmidt demonstrates 'postmodern' considerations not to be unique to our own critical milieu. Rather, they can fruitfully elucidate cultural and literary developments in the English Renaissance, forging a valuable link in the history of ideas and practices, and revealing a new dimension in the relation of early modern studies to the concerns of the present.
Posted in Literary Criticism

Romance on the Early Modern Stage

English Expansion Before and After Shakespeare

Author: Cyrus Mulready

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137322713

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 251

View: 9947

What is dramatic romance? Scholars have long turned to Shakespeare's biography to answer this question, marking his 'late plays' as the beginning and end of the dramatic romance. This book identifies an earlier history for this genre, revealing how stage romances imaginatively expanded audience interest in England's emerging global economy.
Posted in Literary Criticism

Muqarnas

An Annual on Islamic Art and Architecture

Author: Oleg Grabar

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004093720

Category: Art

Page: 138

View: 8275

Oleg Grabar, On Catalogues, Exhibitions, and Complete Works; Jonathan M. Bloom, The Mosque of the Qarafa in Cairo; Leonor Fernandes, The Foundation of Baybars al-Jashankir: Its Waqf, History, and Architecture; Howard Crane, Some Archaeological Notes on Turkish Sardis; Nancy Shatzman Steinhardt, Siyah Qalem and Gong Kai: An Istanbul Album Painter and a Chinese Painter of the Mongolian Period; Do'gan Kuban, The Style of Sinan's Domed Structures; Yasser Tabbaa, Bronze Shapes in Iranian Ceramics of the Twelfth and Thirteenth Centuries; Mehrdad Shokoohy and Natalie H. Shokoohy, The Architecture of Baha al-Din Tughrul in the Region of Bayana, Rajasthan; Glenn D. Lowry, Humayun's Tomb: Form, Function, and Meaning in Early Mughal Architecture; Peter Alford Andrews, The Generous Heart or the Mass of Clouds: The Court Tents of Shah Jahan; Priscilla P. Soucek, Persian Artists in Mughal India: Influences and Transformations; A.J. Lee, Islamic Star Patterns;
Posted in Art

The Academy and Literature

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 1616

The Poetical gazette; the official organ of the Poetry society and a review of poetical affairs, nos. 4-7 issued as supplements to the Academy, v. 79, Oct. 15, Nov. 5, Dec. 3 and 31, 1910
Posted in

The Saxon Chronicle

Author: James Ingram

Publisher: Рипол Классик

ISBN: 5876473529

Category: History

Page: 463

View: 6719

With an English Translation, and Notes, Critical and Explanatory to Which Are Added Chronological, Topographical, and Glossarial Indices. A short grammar of the anglosaxon language; a new map of the England during the heptarchy; plates of coins, & c.
Posted in History

The Semiotics of Rape in Renaissance English Literature

Author: Lee A. Ritscher

Publisher: Peter Lang

ISBN: 9780820497372

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 124

View: 3480

The Semiotics of Rape in Renaissance English Literature traces the development of laws regarding rape in pre- and early modern England, including Anglo-Saxon, Norman, and Tudor changes to the legal code and how legal code, societal expectations of virtuous women, and medical theory interact to coerce silence from early modern rape victims. These forces come to play in the literary texts under examination, including poetry from Sir Philip Sidney and George Gascoigne and drama by William Shakespeare and Thomas Heywood. By examining the narratorial slippage, the gaps between the original Roman myth and the Elizabethan retellings of the narrative, this study seeks to tease out the sites of particularly English forms of misogyny and discover how this misogyny affects all women, not just those who are rape victims.
Posted in Literary Criticism

The Bibliophile Dictionary

A Biographical Record of the Great Authors

Author: Nathan Haskell Dole,Forrest Morgan,Caroline Ticknor

Publisher: The Minerva Group, Inc.

ISBN: 9781410210401

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 660

View: 7980

Originally published in 1904, this is a combination of Biographical and Bibliographical Dictionary based on the following principles: First - A brief biographical notice of every important author known in literary history; Second - A bibliographical notice of his principal or best-known works.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

The Dresden Firebombing

Memory and the Politics of Commemorating Destruction

Author: Norman P Tanner

Publisher: I.B.Tauris

ISBN: 0857735578

Category: Political Science

Page: 224

View: 3876

What comes to light in this lively and readable volume is that the later medieval age was actually one of extraordinary achievement for the Church : of deepening and enrichment, as well as of schism and conflict. Yet the Later Middle Ages (1300-1500 CE) have often been characterised as a period of decline for Christendom. The era seems to sit uncomfortably between the remarkable achievements of church and society in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, and the revivals of the Reformation and Counter-Reformation in the sixteenth century. The period has even been called a 'Babylonian Captivity' for the Church, echoing the struggles of the Israelites in exile, and reflecting the transferral of the papacy to Avignon in 1309. Writing with characteristic mastery of the sources, Norman Tanner challenges this negative view, examining a vibrant period of ecclesiastical history in its own right rather than just through the lenses of the centuries that preceded and succeeded it. He discusses the trials of the age in the form of the papal schism between 1378-1417, the heresies of Cathars, Lollards and Hussites, the Hundred Years' War, and the terror of the Black Death. Yet he focuses, too, on the great ecumenical councils, the flowering of intellectual life in the Renaissance and the extraordinarily rich spirituality of mystics like Julian of Norwich, Catherine of Siena and Meister Eckhart. 'A series such as this is hugely welcome. Its emphasis on the history of ideas, and on the global - not just European - experience of Christianity and its manifestations of church, will be valued by students, scholars and general readers alike. The I.B.Tauris History of the Christian Church brings ecclesiastical history into a new era, for a new generation'. - Diarmaid MacCulloch, Professor of the History of the Church, University of Oxford
Posted in Political Science

Medieval Maritime Warfare

Author: Charles D Stanton

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 1781592519

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 368

Following the fall of Rome, the sea is increasingly the stage upon which the human struggle of western civilization is played out. In a world of few roads and great disorder, the sea is the medium on which power is projected and wealth sought. Yet this confused period in the history of maritime warfare has rarely been studied – it is little known and even less understood. Charles Stanton uses an innovative and involving approach to describe this fascinating but neglected facet of European medieval history. He depicts the development of maritime warfare from the end of the Roman Empire to the dawn of the Renaissance, detailing the wars waged in the Mediterranean by the Byzantines, Muslims, Normans, Crusaders, the Italian maritime republics, Angevins and Aragonese as well as those fought in northern waters by the Vikings, English, French and the Hanseatic League. This pioneering study will be compelling reading for everyone interested in medieval warfare and maritime history.
Posted in History

The Academy

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: English literature

Page: N.A

View: 4814

Posted in English literature