Food in History

Author: Reay Tannahill

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781439506974

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 424

View: 3980

Surveys the evolution of man's diverse gastronomic habits, customs, and traditions against their cultural and historical background
Posted in Business & Economics

Food in History

Author: Reay Tannahill

Publisher: Headline Review

ISBN: 9780747267966

Category: Dinners and dining

Page: 424

View: 2208

From how pepper contributed to the fall of the Roman Empire to how the turkey got its name to what cinnamon had to do with the discovery of America, this enthralling history of foods is packed with intriguing information, lore, and startling insights about how food has influenced world events. Illustrations.
Posted in Dinners and dining

Food in History

Author: Reay Tannahill

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780140469219

Category: Dinners and dining

Page: 424

View: 4373

Spanning over half a million years, this lively account describes the world history of food and the way in which food has influenced the whole course of human development. Full of intriguing information and insights, it reveals how pepper contributed to the fall of the Roman empire; how a new kind of plough helped to spark off the Crusades; why the cow became sacred in India; why stir-fry cooking was invented; how the turkey got its name. This book confirms that food is still, as it always has been, not only inseperable from the history of the human race but essential to it.
Posted in Dinners and dining

Food in History

Author: Reay Tannahill

Publisher: Broadway Books

ISBN: 9780517884041

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 424

View: 3793

Surveys the evolution of man's diverse gastronomic habits, customs, and traditions against their cultural and historical background
Posted in Business & Economics

Food in Medieval Times

Author: Melitta Weiss Adamson

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780313321474

Category: Cooking

Page: 256

View: 7300

New light is shed on everyday life in the Middle Ages in Great Britain and continental Europe through this unique survey of its food culture. Students and other readers will learn about the common foodstuffs available, how and what they cooked, ate, and drank, what the regional cuisines were like, how the different classes entertained and celebrated, and what restrictions they followed for health and faith reasons. Fascinating information is provided, such as on imitation food, kitchen humor, and medical ideas. Many period recipes and quotations flesh out the narrative. The book draws on a variety of period sources, including as literature, account books, cookbooks, religious texts, archaeology, and art. Food was a status symbol then, and sumptuary laws defined what a person of a certain class could eat--the ingredients and preparation of a dish and how it was eaten depended on a person's status, and most information is available on the upper crust rather than the masses. Equalizing factors might have been religious strictures and such diseases as the bubonic plague, all of which are detailed here.
Posted in Cooking

Food in Early Modern Europe

Author: Ken Albala

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780313319624

Category: Cooking

Page: 260

View: 9049

Looks at the importance of food in the evolution of Europe following the Middle Ages, discussing the role of food in exploration, agricultural development, and global trade.
Posted in Cooking

Southern Food

At Home, on the Road, in History

Author: John Egerton

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 9780807844175

Category: Cooking

Page: 408

View: 6695

Egerton explores southern food in over 200 restaurants in 11 Southern states, describing each establishment's specialties and recounting his conversations with owners, cooks, waiters, and customers. Includes more than 150 regional recipes.
Posted in Cooking

A History of Food in 100 Recipes

Author: William Sitwell

Publisher: Little, Brown

ISBN: 031625570X

Category: Cooking

Page: 360

View: 7990

A riveting narrative history of food as seen through 100 recipes, from ancient Egyptian bread to modernist cuisine. We all love to eat, and most people have a favorite ingredient or dish. But how many of us know where our much-loved recipes come from, who invented them, and how they were originally cooked? In A HISTORY OF FOOD IN 100 RECIPES, culinary expert and BBC television personality William Sitwell explores the fascinating history of cuisine from the first cookbook to the first cupcake, from the invention of the sandwich to the rise of food television. A book you can read straight through and also use in the kitchen, A HISTORY OF FOOD IN 100 RECIPES is a perfect gift for any food lover who has ever wondered about the origins of the methods and recipes we now take for granted.
Posted in Cooking

Food

A Culinary History

Author: Jean-Louis Flandrin,Massimo Montanari

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 023111155X

Category: Cooking

Page: 624

View: 549

Food and drink.
Posted in Cooking

Food

The History of Taste

Author: Paul H. Freedman

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520254763

Category: Cooking

Page: 368

View: 5858

This richly illustrated book applies the discoveries of the new generation of food historians to the pleasures of dining and the culinary accomplishments of diverse civilizations, past and present. Freedman gathers essays by French, German, Belgian, American, and British historians to present a comprehensive, chronological history of taste.
Posted in Cooking

Investigating Food in History

Author: Lisa Chaney

Publisher: Trafalgar Square Publishing

ISBN: 9780707801490

Category: Cookery, English

Page: 32

View: 2525

Posted in Cookery, English

Food in Antiquity

Author: John Wilkins,F. David Harvey,Mike Dobson,Michael J. Dobson

Publisher: Liverpool University Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: Cooking

Page: 459

View: 3698

Food as a cultural symbol was as important in antiquity as in our own time, and Food in Antiquity investigates some of the ways in which food and eating shaped the lives and thoughts of the indigenous peoples of the ancient Mediterranean. In this volume, thirty contributors consider aspects of food and eating in the Greco-Roman world. This is the most comprehensive exploration of questions relating to food in antiquity in this country. The authors, some specialists in this field, others with expertise in other areas, use a range of approaches to investigate the production and distribution of food, social, religious and political factors, medicine and diet, cultural identity and contrasts with neighbouring cultures, and food in literature. The volume is designed for both Classicists and those interested in the history of food. The aim is both to illuminate and to entertain, and at the same time to remind the reader that the Greeks and Romans were not only philosophers and rulers of empires, they were also peasant farmers, traders and consumers of foods who considered that what and how they ate defined who they were.
Posted in Cooking

Cuisine and Culture

A History of Food and People

Author: Linda Civitello

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 0470403713

Category: Cooking

Page: 436

View: 475

Why did the ancient Romans believe cinnamon grew in swamps guarded by giant killer bats? How did African cultures imported by slavery influence cooking in the American South? What does the 700-seat McDonald's in Beijing serve in the age of globalization? With the answers to these and many more such questions, this third edition of Cuisine and Culture presents an engaging, entertaining, and informative exploration of the interactions among history, culture, and food.
Posted in Cooking

Food in World History

Author: Jeffrey M. Pilcher

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317514505

Category: History

Page: 164

View: 3000

The second edition of this concise survey offers a comparative and comprehensive study of culinary cultures and food politics throughout the world, from ancient times to the present day. It examines the long history of globalization of foods as well as the political, social, and environmental implications of our changing relationship with food, showing how hunger and taste have been driving forces in human history.? Including numerous case studies from diverse societies and periods, Food in World History explores such questions as: What social factors have historically influenced culinary globalization? How did early modern plantations establish patterns for modern industrial food production? Were eighteenth-century food riots comparable to contemporary social movements around food? Did Italian and Chinese migrant cooks sacrifice authenticity to gain social acceptance in the Americas? Have genetically modified foods fulfilled the promises made by proponents? This new edition includes expanded discussions of gender and the family, indigeneity, and the politics of food. Expanded chapters on contemporary food systems and culinary pluralism examine debates over the concentration of corporate control over seeds and marketing, authenticity and exoticism within the culinary tourism industry, and the impact of social media on restaurants and home cooks.
Posted in History

Food in the Civil War Era

The South

Author: Helen Zoe Veit

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781611861648

Category: Cooking

Page: 266

View: 7656

This fascinating study in cultural history presents a variety of Civil War-era recipes from the South, accompanied by intriguing essays describing this tumultuous period. This second volume in the American Food in History series sheds new light on cooking and eating in the Civil War South, pointing out how seemingly neutral recipes can reveal aspects of life beyond the dinner plate, from responses to the anti-slavery movement to shifting economic imperatives to changing ideas about women's roles.
Posted in Cooking

Culture of the Fork

A Brief History of Everyday Food and Haute Cuisine in Europe

Author: Giovanni Rebora

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231518455

Category: Cooking

Page: 224

View: 9556

We know where he went, what he wrote, and even what he wore, but what in the world did Christopher Columbus eat? The Renaissance and the age of discovery introduced Europeans to exotic cultures, mores, manners, and ideas. Along with the cross-cultural exchange of Old and New World, East and West, came new foodstuffs, preparations, and flavors. That kitchen revolution led to the development of new utensils and table manners. Some of the impact is still felt—and tasted—today. Giovanni Rebora has crafted an elegant and accessible history filled with fascinating information and illustrations. He discusses the availability of resources, how people kept from starving in the winter, how they farmed, how tastes developed and changed, what the lower classes ate, and what the aristocracy enjoyed. The book is divided into brief chapters covering the history of bread, soups, stuffed pastas, the use of salt, cheese, meat, fish, fruits and vegetables, the arrival of butter, the quest for sugar, new world foods, setting the table, and beverages, including wine and tea. A special appendix, "A Meal with Columbus," includes a mini-anthology of recipes from the countries where he lived: Italy, Portugal, Spain, and England. Entertaining and enlightening, Culture of the Fork will interest scholars of history and gastronomy—and everyone who eats.
Posted in Cooking

Feasts and Fasts

A History of Food in India

Author: Colleen Taylor Sen

Publisher: Reaktion Books

ISBN: 1780233914

Category: Cooking

Page: 336

View: 9689

From dal to samosas, paneer to vindaloo, dosa to naan, Indian food is diverse and wide-ranging—unsurprising when you consider India’s incredible range of climates, languages, religions, tribes, and customs. Its cuisine differs from north to south, yet what is it that makes Indian food recognizably Indian, and how did it get that way? To answer those questions, Colleen Taylor Sen examines the diet of the Indian subcontinent for thousands of years, describing the country’s cuisine in the context of its religious, moral, social, and philosophical development. Exploring the ancient indigenous plants such as lentils, eggplants, and peppers that are central to the Indian diet, Sen depicts the country’s agricultural bounty and the fascination it has long held for foreign visitors. She illuminates how India’s place at the center of a vast network of land and sea trade routes led it to become a conduit for plants, dishes, and cooking techniques to and from the rest of the world. She shows the influence of the British and Portuguese during the colonial period, and she addresses India’s dietary prescriptions and proscriptions, the origins of vegetarianism, its culinary borrowings and innovations, and the links between diet, health, and medicine. She also offers a taste of Indian cooking itself—especially its use of spices, from chili pepper, cardamom, and cumin to turmeric, ginger, and coriander—and outlines how the country’s cuisine varies throughout its many regions. Lavishly illustrated with one hundred images, Feasts and Fasts is a mouthwatering tour of Indian food full of fascinating anecdotes and delicious recipes that will have readers devouring its pages.
Posted in Cooking

Food in Medieval England

Diet and Nutrition

Author: C. M. Woolgar,D. Serjeantson,T. Waldron

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0199273499

Category: Cooking

Page: 347

View: 9210

'Food in Medieval England' draws on research across different disciplines to present a picture of the English diet from the early Saxon period up to 1540. It uses a range of sources, from the historical records of medieval farms, abbeys, & households both great & small, to animal bones, human remains, & plants from archaeological sites.
Posted in Cooking

Food in the American Guilded Age

Author: Helen Zoe Veit

Publisher: American Food in History

ISBN: 9781611862355

Category: Cooking

Page: 344

View: 7906

Includes texts originally published 1870-1903.
Posted in Cooking

Milk!

A 10,000-Year Food Fracas

Author: Mark Kurlansky

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 1632863847

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 4763

Mark Kurlansky's first global food history since the bestselling Cod and Salt; the fascinating cultural, economic, and culinary story of milk and all things dairy--with recipes throughout. According to the Greek creation myth, we are so much spilt milk; a splatter of the goddess Hera's breast milk became our galaxy, the Milky Way. But while mother's milk may be the essence of nourishment, it is the milk of other mammals that humans have cultivated ever since the domestication of animals more than 10,000 years ago, originally as a source of cheese, yogurt, kefir, and all manner of edible innovations that rendered lactose digestible, and then, when genetic mutation made some of us lactose-tolerant, milk itself. Before the industrial revolution, it was common for families to keep dairy cows and produce their own milk. But during the nineteenth century mass production and urbanization made milk safety a leading issue of the day, with milk-borne illnesses a common cause of death. Pasteurization slowly became a legislative matter. And today milk is a test case in the most pressing issues in food politics, from industrial farming and animal rights to GMOs, the locavore movement, and advocates for raw milk, who controversially reject pasteurization. Profoundly intertwined with human civilization, milk has a compelling and a surprisingly global story to tell, and historian Mark Kurlansky is the perfect person to tell it. Tracing the liquid's diverse history from antiquity to the present, he details its curious and crucial role in cultural evolution, religion, nutrition, politics, and economics.
Posted in History