Food Fights & Culture Wars

A Secret History of Taste

Author: Tom Nealon

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781468316797

Category: Cooking

Page: 224

View: 7272

Through war and plague, revolution and migration, people have always had to eat. Parallel to the history books, a second, more obscure history was being recorded in the cookbooks of the time, which charted the evolution of meals and the transmission of ingredients around the world. In this eclectic book of food history, antiquarian cookbook expert Tom Nealon makes the case that the course of civilization has secretly been defined by two forces: hunger and taste. In the course of this sumptuous feast of a book, Tom Nealon takes on such overlooked themes as carp and the Crusades, brown sauce and Byron, and chillies and cannibalism. He examines conspiracies and controversies, probing the connections between the French Revolution and table settings, food thickness and colonialism, lemonade and the Black Plague, "and other astonishing connections in this wide-ranging history of food--and civilization itself" (Entertainment Weekly, Best New Books). Beautifully illustrated with material from the collection of the British Library, Food Fights & Culture Wars draws depth from Tom Nealon's wide-ranging knowledge to explore the mysteries at the intersection of food and society.
Posted in Cooking

Spice

The History of a Temptation

Author: Jack Turner

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307491226

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 9556

In this brilliant, engrossing work, Jack Turner explores an era—from ancient times through the Renaissance—when what we now consider common condiments were valued in gold and blood. Spices made sour medieval wines palatable, camouflaged the smell of corpses, and served as wedding night aphrodisiacs. Indispensible for cooking, medicine, worship, and the arts of love, they were thought to have magical properties and were so valuable that they were often kept under lock and key. For some, spices represented Paradise, for others, the road to perdition, but they were potent symbols of wealth and power, and the wish to possess them drove explorers to circumnavigate the globe—and even to savagery. Following spices across continents and through literature and mythology, Spice is a beguiling narrative about the surprisingly vast influence spices have had on human desire. Includes eight pages of color photographs. One of the Best Books of the Year: Discover Magazine, The Christian Science Monitor, San Francisco Chronicle
Posted in History

Manifestos on the Future of Food & Seed

Author: Vandana Shiva

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780896087774

Category: Nature

Page: 145

View: 8221

A wide range of contributors offer suggestions on how to make food and agriculture more socially and ecologically sustainable, including essays by Prince Charles and Carlo Petrini.
Posted in Nature

The Devil's Dinner

A Gastronomic and Cultural History of Chili Peppers

Author: Stuart Walton

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN: 1250163218

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 2970

Stuart Walton's The Devil's Dinner looks at the history of hot peppers, their culinary uses through the ages, and the significance of spicy food in an increasingly homogenous world. The Devil's Dinner is the first authoritative history of chili peppers. There are countless books on cooking with chilies, but no book goes into depth about the biological, gastronomical, and cultural impact this forbidden fruit has had upon people all over the world. The story has been too hot to handle. A billion dollar industry, hot peppers are especially popular in the United States, where a superhot movement is on the rise. Hot peppers started out in Mexico and South America, came to Europe with returning Spanish travelers, lit up Iberian cuisine with piri-piri and pimientos, continued along eastern trade routes, boosted mustard and pepper in cuisines of the Indian subcontinent, then took overland routes to central Europe in the paprika of Hungarian and Austrian dumplings, devilled this and devilled that... they've been everywhere! The Devil's Dinner tells the history of hot peppers and captures the rise of the superhot movement.
Posted in Social Science

Eight Flavors

The Untold Story of American Cuisine

Author: Sarah Lohman

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1476753962

Category: Cooking

Page: 280

View: 6855

This unique culinary history of America offers a fascinating look at our past and uses long-forgotten recipes to explain how eight flavors changed how we eat. Eight Flavors introduces the explorers, merchants, botanists, farmers, writers, and chefs whose choices came to define the American palate. Lohman takes you on a journey through the past to tell us something about our present, and our future. We meet John Crowninshield a New England merchant who traveled to Sumatra in the 1790s in search of black pepper. And Edmond Albius, a twelve-year-old slave who lived on an island off the coast of Madagascar, who discovered the technique still used to pollinate vanilla orchids today. Weaving together original research, historical recipes, gorgeous illustrations and Lohman's own adventures both in the kitchen and in the field, Eight Flavors is a delicious treat--ready to be devoured.--Adapted from book jacket.
Posted in Cooking

From Gluttony to Enlightenment

The World of Taste in Early Modern Europe

Author: Viktoria von Hoffmann

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 0252099087

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 3338

Scorned since antiquity as low and animal, the sense of taste is celebrated today as an ally of joy, a source of adventure, and an arena for pursuing sophistication. The French exalted taste as an entrée to ecstasy, and revolutionized their cuisine and language to express this new way of engaging with the world. Viktoria von Hoffmann explores four kinds of early modern texts--culinary, medical, religious, and philosophical--to follow taste's ascent from the sinful to the beautiful. Combining food studies and sensory history, she takes readers on an odyssey that redefined a fundamental human experience. Scholars and cooks rediscovered a vast array of ways to prepare and present foods. Far-sailing fleets returned to Europe bursting with new vegetables, exotic fruits, and pungent spices. Hosts refined notions of hospitality in the home while philosophers pondered the body and its perceptions. As von Hoffmann shows, these labors produced a sea change in perception and thought, one that moved taste from the base realm of the tongue to the ethereal heights of aesthetics.
Posted in Social Science

Shadow of a Bull

Author: Maia Wojciechowska

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 144246593X

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 160

View: 966

Maia Wojciechowska's 1965 Newbery Medal winner about a young boy struggling with his father's legacy. Manolo was only three when his father, the great bullfighter Juan Olivar, died. But Juan is never far from Manolo's consciousness--how could he be, with the entire town of Arcangel waiting for the day Manolo will fulfill his father's legacy? But Manolo has a secret he dares to share with no one--he is a coward, without afición, the love of the sport that enables a bullfighter to rise above his fear and face a raging bull. As the day when he must enter the ring approaches, Manolo finds himself questioning which requires more courage: to follow in his father's legendary footsteps or to pursue his own destiny?
Posted in Juvenile Fiction

Flame of Resistance

Author: Tracy Groot

Publisher: Tyndale House Publishers, Inc.

ISBN: 9781414373775

Category: Fiction

Page: 416

View: 5854

Years of living in Nazi-occupied Normandy have been hard for Brigitte Durand, but when American fighter pilot Tom Jaeger is shot down over France and is picked up by the Resistance, they work together for a brighter future.
Posted in Fiction

The Imperial Cruise

A Secret History of Empire and War

Author: James Bradley

Publisher: Little, Brown

ISBN: 9780316039666

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 5910

In 1905 President Teddy Roosevelt dispatched Secretary of War William Howard Taft on the largest U.S. diplomatic mission in history to Hawaii, Japan, the Philippines, China, and Korea. Roosevelt's glamorous twenty-one year old daughter Alice served as mistress of the cruise, which included senators and congressmen. On this trip, Taft concluded secret agreements in Roosevelt's name. In 2005, a century later, James Bradley traveled in the wake of Roosevelt's mission and discovered what had transpired in Honolulu, Tokyo, Manila, Beijing and Seoul. In 1905, Roosevelt was bully-confident and made secret agreements that he though would secure America's westward push into the Pacific. Instead, he lit the long fuse on the Asian firecrackers that would singe America's hands for a century.
Posted in History

Intelligence Wars

American Secret History from Hitler to Al-Qaeda

Author: Thomas Powers

Publisher: New York Review of Books

ISBN: 9781590170984

Category: History

Page: 504

View: 3757

The author of The Man Who Kept the Secrets: Richard Helms and the CIA and other illuminating books on America's intelligence infrastructure chronicles the CIA's postwar record of successes and failures in its various wars against communists, dictatorships, and terrorists. Reprint.
Posted in History

Wine and War

The French, the Nazis, and the Battle for France's Greatest Treasure

Author: Donald Kladstrup,Petie Kladstrup

Publisher: Broadway Books

ISBN: 9780767913256

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 2803

The remarkable untold story of France’s courageous, clever vinters who protected and rescued the country’s most treasured commodity from German plunder during World War II. "To be a Frenchman means to fight for your country and its wine." –Claude Terrail, owner, Restaurant La Tour d’Argent In 1940, France fell to the Nazis and almost immediately the German army began a campaign of pillaging one of the assets the French hold most dear: their wine. Like others in the French Resistance, winemakers mobilized to oppose their occupiers, but the tale of their extraordinary efforts has remained largely unknown–until now. This is the thrilling and harrowing story of the French wine producers who undertook ingenious, daring measures to save their cherished crops and bottles as the Germans closed in on them. Wine and War illuminates a compelling, little-known chapter of history, and stands as a tribute to extraordinary individuals who waged a battle that, in a very real way, saved the spirit of France. From the Trade Paperback edition.
Posted in History

Rise and Kill First

The Secret History of Israel's Targeted Assassinations

Author: Ronen Bergman

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 0679604685

Category: History

Page: 784

View: 3776

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • The first definitive history of the Mossad, Shin Bet, and the IDF’s targeted killing programs, hailed by The New York Times as “an exceptional work, a humane book about an incendiary subject.” The Talmud says: “If someone comes to kill you, rise up and kill him first.” This instinct to take every measure, even the most aggressive, to defend the Jewish people is hardwired into Israel’s DNA. From the very beginning of its statehood in 1948, protecting the nation from harm has been the responsibility of its intelligence community and armed services, and there is one weapon in their vast arsenal that they have relied upon to thwart the most serious threats: Targeted assassinations have been used countless times, on enemies large and small, sometimes in response to attacks against the Israeli people and sometimes preemptively. In this page-turning, eye-opening book, journalist and military analyst Ronen Bergman—praised by David Remnick as “arguably [Israel’s] best investigative reporter”—offers a riveting inside account of the targeted killing programs: their successes, their failures, and the moral and political price exacted on the men and women who approved and carried out the missions. Bergman has gained the exceedingly rare cooperation of many current and former members of the Israeli government, including Prime Ministers Shimon Peres, Ehud Barak, Ariel Sharon, and Benjamin Netanyahu, as well as high-level figures in the country’s military and intelligence services: the IDF (Israel Defense Forces), the Mossad (the world’s most feared intelligence agency), Caesarea (a “Mossad within the Mossad” that carries out attacks on the highest-value targets), and the Shin Bet (an internal security service that implemented the largest targeted assassination campaign ever, in order to stop what had once appeared to be unstoppable: suicide terrorism). Including never-before-reported, behind-the-curtain accounts of key operations, and based on hundreds of on-the-record interviews and thousands of files to which Bergman has gotten exclusive access over his decades of reporting, Rise and Kill First brings us deep into the heart of Israel’s most secret activities. Bergman traces, from statehood to the present, the gripping events and thorny ethical questions underlying Israel’s targeted killing campaign, which has shaped the Israeli nation, the Middle East, and the entire world. “A remarkable feat of fearless and responsible reporting . . . important, timely, and informative.”—John le Carré
Posted in History

A History of Venice

Author: John Julius Norwich

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0141936789

Category: History

Page: 704

View: 9590

John Julius Norwich's dazzling history of Venice from its origins to its eighteenth century fall. 'Lord Norwich has loved and understood Venice as well as any other Englishman has ever done. He has put readers of his generation more in his debt than any other English writer' Peter Levi, The Sunday Times.
Posted in History

Ashley's War

The Untold Story of a Team of Women Soldiers on the Special Ops Battlefield

Author: Gayle Tzemach Lemmon

Publisher: HarperCollins

ISBN: 0062333836

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 336

View: 1680

In 2010, the Army created Cultural Support Teams, a secret pilot program to insert women alongside Special Operations soldiers battling in Afghanistan. The Army reasoned that women could play a unique role on Special Ops teams: accompanying their male colleagues on raids and, while those soldiers were searching for insurgents, questioning the mothers, sisters, daughters and wives living at the compound. Their presence had a calming effect on enemy households, but more importantly, the CSTs were able to search adult women for weapons and gather crucial intelligence. They could build relationships—woman to woman—in ways that male soldiers in an Islamic country never could. In Ashley's War, Gayle Tzemach Lemmon uses on-the-ground reporting and a finely tuned understanding of the complexities of war to tell the story of CST-2, a unit of women hand-picked from the Army to serve in this highly specialized and challenging role. The pioneers of CST-2 proved for the first time, at least to some grizzled Special Operations soldiers, that women might be physically and mentally tough enough to become one of them. The price of this professional acceptance came in personal loss and social isolation: the only people who really understand the women of CST-2 are each other. At the center of this story is a friendship cemented by "Glee," video games, and the shared perils and seductive powers of up-close combat. At the heart of the team is the tale of a beloved and effective soldier, Ashley White. Much as she did in her bestselling The Dressmaker of Khair Khana, Lemmon transports readers to a world they previously had no idea existed: a community of women called to fulfill the military's mission to "win hearts and minds" and bound together by danger, valor, and determination. Ashley's War is a gripping combat narrative and a moving story of friendship—a book that will change the way readers think about war and the meaning of service.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

White Trash

The 400-year Untold History of Class in America

Author: Nancy Isenberg

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0670785970

Category: History

Page: 460

View: 6138

"A history of the class system in America from the colonial era to the present illuminates the crucial legacy of the underprivileged white demographic, citing the pivotal contributions of lower-class white workers in wartime, social policy, and the rise of the Republican Party"--NoveList.
Posted in History

Ten Restaurants That Changed America

Author: Paul Freedman

Publisher: Liveright Publishing

ISBN: 1631492462

Category: Cooking

Page: 528

View: 3952

From Delmonico’s to Sylvia’s to Chez Panisse, a daring and original history of dining out in America as told through ten legendary restaurants. Combining a historian’s rigor with a foodie ’s palate, Ten Restaurants That Changed America reveals how the history of our restaurants reflects nothing less than the history of America itself. Whether charting the rise of our love affair with Chinese food through San Francisco’s fabled The Mandarin, evoking the richness of Italian food through Mamma Leone’s, or chronicling the rise and fall of French haute cuisine through Henri Soulé’s Le Pavillon, food historian Paul Freedman uses each restaurant to tell a wider story of race and class, immigration and assimilation. Freedman also treats us to a scintillating history of the then-revolutionary Schrafft’s, a chain of convivial lunch spots that catered to women, and that bygone favorite, Howard Johnson’s, which pioneered midcentury, on-the-road dining, only to be swept aside by McDonald's. Lavishly designed with more than 100 photographs and images, including original menus, Ten Restaurants That Changed America is a significant and highly entertaining social history.
Posted in Cooking

Butter

A Rich History

Author: Elaine Khosrova

Publisher: Algonquin Books

ISBN: 1616207396

Category: Cooking

Page: 368

View: 5122

“Edifying from every point of view--historical, cultural, and culinary.” —David Tanis, author of A Platter of Figs and Other Recipes It’s a culinary catalyst, an agent of change, a gastronomic rock star. Ubiquitous in the world’s most fabulous cuisines, butter is boss. Here, it finally gets its due. After traveling across three continents to stalk the modern story of butter, award-winning food writer and former pastry chef Elaine Khosrova serves up a story as rich, textured, and culturally relevant as butter itself. From its humble agrarian origins to its present-day artisanal glory, butter has a fascinating story to tell, and Khosrova is the perfect person to tell it. With tales about the ancient butter bogs of Ireland, the pleasure dairies of France, and the sacred butter sculptures of Tibet, Khosrova details butter’s role in history, politics, economics, nutrition, and even spirituality and art. Readers will also find the essential collection of core butter recipes, including beurre manié, croissants, pâte brisée, and the only buttercream frosting anyone will ever need, as well as practical how-tos for making various types of butter at home--or shopping for the best. “A fascinating, tasty read . . . And what a bonus to have a collection of essential classic butter recipes included.” —David Tanis, author of A Platter of Figs and Other Recipes “Following the path blazed by Margaret Visser in Much Depends on Dinner, Elaine Khosrova makes much of butter and the ruminants whose milk man churns. You will revel in dairy physics. And you may never eat margarine again.” —John T. Edge, author of The Potlikker Papers: A Food History of the Modern South “Butter proves that close study can reveal rich history, lore, and practical information. All that and charm too.” —Mimi Sheraton, author of 1,000 Foods to Eat Before You Die “Irresistible and fascinating . . . This is one of those definitive books on a subject that every cook should have.” —Elisabeth Prueitt, co-owner of Tartine Bakery “The history of one of the most delectable ingredients throughout our many cultures and geography over time is wonderfully churned and emulsified in Khosrova’s Butter . . . Delightful storytelling.” —Elizabeth Falkner, author of Demolition Desserts: Recipes from Citizen Cake
Posted in Cooking

The Sushi Economy

Globalization and the Making of a Modern Delicacy

Author: Sasha Issenberg

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101216883

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 352

View: 5384

The highly acclaimed exploration of sushi’s surprising history, global business, and international allure One generation ago, sushi’s narrow reach ensured that sports fishermen who caught tuna in most of parts of the world sold the meat for pennies as cat food. Today, the fatty cuts of tuna known as toro are among the planet’s most coveted luxury foods, worth hundreds of dollars a pound and capable of losing value more quickly than any other product on earth. So how did one of the world’s most popular foods go from being practically unknown in the United States to being served in towns all across America, and in such a short span of time? A riveting combination of culinary biography, behind-the- scenes restaurant detail, and a unique exploration of globalization’s dynamics, the book traces sushi’s journey from Japanese street snack to global delicacy. After traversing the pages of The Sushi Economy, you’ll never see the food on your plate—or the world around you—quite the same way again.
Posted in Business & Economics

Blood of Belvidere

A Grenada Novel

Author: Dunbar Campbell

Publisher: CreateSpace

ISBN: 9781492999249

Category: Fiction

Page: 348

View: 4125

Grenada is a marriage between stunning Caribbean beauty and historical conflict. Blood of Belvidere takes readers on an unforgettable journey deep into the tropical mystique that attracted international intrigue to her shores for hundreds of years. As a young boy growing up in Grenada, Scott McDonald's growing pain becomes intertwined with the legacy behind the strange disappearance of a slave-rebellion leader two-hundred years earlier. Secrets and treachery inflict havoc down eight generations of McDonalds, believed to be descendants of the rebel's archenemy. In Scott's search for the truth, he is recruited into an antigovernment movement plotting to overthrow an iron-fisted dictator. When the dictator crushes the movement, Scott flees the island and leaves his entire world behind including the girl he loves, and who is now presumed killed by secret police. He migrates to the United States and enlists in the U.S. Marines to forget his past. But fate intervenes. The U.S. invades the island to topple a brutal Marxist government and to rescue American students from the turmoil. Scott is among the invaders. He seeks retribution for his grief, but echoes of his family past remind him of a more sacred mission. He must uncover why a mysterious event in the Belvidere Mountains two-hundred years ago could still fan the fires of dictatorship, revolution, and invasion. But will he be prepared when he comes face-to-face with the truth? Blood of Belvidere is a story about human struggle in the darkness of oppression, the bitter taste of betrayal, the sustenance of love, and the healing power of reconciliation. This is a story of hope.
Posted in Fiction