Firestorm at Peshtigo

A Town, Its People, and the Deadliest Fire in American History

Author: Denise Gess,William Lutz

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 9780805067804

Category: History

Page: 267

View: 5046

Documents the conflagration that swept through Peshtigo, Wisconsin, on October 8, 1871--the same night as the Great Chicago Fire--incinerating more than 2,400 square miles of land and killing more than two thousand people.
Posted in History

Firestorm at Peshtigo

A Town, Its People, and the Deadliest Fire in American History

Author: Denise Gess,William Lutz

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 9780805067804

Category: History

Page: 267

View: 5127

Documents the conflagration that swept through Peshtigo, Wisconsin, on October 8, 1871--the same night as the Great Chicago Fire--incinerating more than 2,400 square miles of land and killing more than two thousand people.
Posted in History

The Great Peshtigo Fire

Stories and Science from America’s Deadliest Fire

Author: Scott Knickelbine

Publisher: Wisconsin Historical Society

ISBN: 0870206028

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 80

View: 7421

On the night of October 8, 1871, a whirlwind of fire swept through northeastern Wisconsin, destroying the bustling frontier town of Peshtigo. Trees, buildings, and people burst into flames. Metal melted. Sand turned into glass. People thought the end of the world had come. When the “tornado of fire” was over, 2,500 people were dead, and Peshtigo was nothing but a smoking ruin. It was the deadliest wildfire in U.S. history. The Great Peshtigo Fire: Stories and Science from America’s Deadliest Firestorm explores the history, science, and legacy of the 1871 Peshtigo Fire at a fourth-grade reading level. Readers will learn about the history of settlement, agriculture, and forestry in 19th-century Wisconsin. This illuminating text covers a diverse range of topics that will enrich the reader’s understanding of the Peshtigo Fire, including the building and land-use practices of the time that made the area ripe for such a fire, the weather patterns that fostered widespread fires throughout the upper Midwest in the summer and fall of 1871, and exciting first-person accounts that vividly bring the `victims’ stories to life. Connections made between the Peshtigo Fire and the history of fire prevention in the United States encourage critical thinking about issues that remain controversial to this day, such as planned burns and housing development restrictions near forested areas. The Great Peshtigo Fire: Stories and Science from America’s Deadliest Firestorm will inform and captivate its readers as it journeys through the horrifying history of the Peshtigo Fire.
Posted in Juvenile Nonfiction

Disasters and Tragic Events: An Encyclopedia of Catastrophes in American History [2 volumes]

Author: Mitchell Newton-Matza

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1610691660

Category: History

Page: 789

View: 3923

From the Salem Witch Trials of 1692 to the Sandy Hook school massacre of 2012, this two-volume encyclopedia surveys tragic events—natural and man-made, famous and forgotten—that helped shape American history. • Covers a wide range of topics, from the infamous to the obscure • Places each event in context, giving it deeper meaning and showing its impact • Includes primary source material from U.S. Supreme Court cases, presidential speeches, eyewitness accounts, state and federal legislation, and federal government investigations • Brings the events it covers to life through photos and illustrations
Posted in History

Der Zirkusbrand

Eine wahre Geschichte

Author: Stewart O'Nan

Publisher: Rowohlt Verlag GmbH

ISBN: 3644025517

Category: Fiction

Page: 512

View: 3305

Der 6. Juli 1944 verhieß für die Bewohner der Stadt Hartfort in Connecticut vergnüglich zu werden. Stattdessen endet er in einer Katastrophe: 167 Menschen sterben in den Flammen des größten Zirkusbrandes der amerikanischen Geschichte. Fesselnd und einfühlsam verfolgt Stewart O’Nan die Schicksale jener Menschen, die an einem scheinbar harmlosen Sommertag losgehen, um sich unterhalten zu lassen, und mit Tod und Schrecken konfrontiert werden. «Ein grandioses Stück Literatur.» (Der Spiegel) «‹Der Zirkusbrand› liest sich spannend wie ein Abenteuerroman, da er fast fiktiv in den vielen Verflechtungen menschlicher Schicksale wirkt und philosophisch in seiner Frage, weshalb gerade an diesem Tag bestimmte Menschen zu einer bestimmten Zeit an diesem bestimmten Ort zusammenkamen.» (NDR) «‹Der Zirkusbrand› ist Journalismus im Dienste der Literatur und Literatur im Dienste der Geschichtsschreibung.» (The New York Times) «Ein großes Buch.» (Süddeutsche Zeitung)
Posted in Fiction

Historic Sites and Landmarks that Shaped America: From Acoma Pueblo to Ground Zero [2 volumes]

From Acoma Pueblo to Ground Zero

Author: Mitchell Newton-Matza

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1610697502

Category: Architecture

Page: 810

View: 4425

Exploring the significance of places that built our cultural past, this guide is a lens into historical sites spanning the entire history of the United States, from Acoma Pueblo to Ground Zero. • Covers locations across the entire United States • Includes photographs, illustrations, and sidebars • Serves as both an educational and research tool
Posted in Architecture

Calling this Place Home

Author: N.A

Publisher: Minnesota Historical Society

ISBN: 9780873517287

Category: Wisconsin

Page: 518

View: 5125

Posted in Wisconsin

American Canopy

Trees, Forests, and the Making of a Nation

Author: Eric Rutkow

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1439193606

Category: Nature

Page: 416

View: 6381

This fascinating and groundbreaking work tells the remarkable story of the relationship between Americans and their trees across the entire span of our nation’s history. Like many of us, historians have long been guilty of taking trees for granted. Yet the history of trees in America is no less remarkable than the history of the United States itself—from the majestic white pines of New England, which were coveted by the British Crown for use as masts in navy warships, to the orange groves of California, which lured settlers west. In fact, without the country’s vast forests and the hundreds of tree species they contained, there would have been no ships, docks, railroads, stockyards, wagons, barrels, furniture, newspapers, rifles, or firewood. No shingled villages or whaling vessels in New England. No New York City, Miami, or Chicago. No Johnny Appleseed, Paul Bunyan, or Daniel Boone. No Allied planes in World War I, and no suburban sprawl in the middle of the twentieth century. America—if indeed it existed—would be a very different place without its millions of acres of trees. As Eric Rutkow’s brilliant, epic account shows, trees were essential to the early years of the republic and indivisible from the country’s rise as both an empire and a civilization. Among American Canopy’s many fascinating stories: the Liberty Trees, where colonists gathered to plot rebellion against the British; Henry David Thoreau’s famous retreat into the woods; the creation of New York City’s Central Park; the great fire of 1871 that killed a thousand people in the lumber town of Peshtigo, Wisconsin; the fevered attempts to save the American chestnut and the American elm from extinction; and the controversy over spotted owls and the old-growth forests they inhabited. Rutkow also explains how trees were of deep interest to such figures as George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, Teddy Roosevelt, and FDR, who oversaw the planting of more than three billion trees nationally in his time as president. As symbols of liberty, community, and civilization, trees are perhaps the loudest silent figures in our country’s history. America started as a nation of people frightened of the deep, seemingly infinite woods; we then grew to rely on our forests for progress and profit; by the end of the twentieth century we came to understand that the globe’s climate is dependent on the preservation of trees. Today, few people think about where timber comes from, but most of us share a sense that to destroy trees is to destroy part of ourselves and endanger the future. Never before has anyone treated our country’s trees and forests as the subject of a broad historical study, and the result is an accessible, informative, and thoroughly entertaining read. Audacious in its four-hundred-year scope, authoritative in its detail, and elegant in its execution, American Canopy is perfect for history buffs and nature lovers alike and announces Eric Rutkow as a major new author of popular history.
Posted in Nature

The Peshtigo Fire of 1871

The Story of the Deadliest Fire in American History

Author: Charles River Editors

Publisher: CreateSpace

ISBN: 9781500896911

Category: History

Page: 34

View: 1037

*Includes pictures *Includes witness accounts of the fire *Includes a bibliography for further reading "Why is this story not known? You see endless stories about Johnstown. What happened at Peshtigo makes Johnstown look like a birdbath." - Bill Lutz, co-author of Firestorm at Peshtigo "The air burned hotter than a crematorium and the fire traveled at 90 mph. I read an account of a Civil War veteran who had been through some of the worst battles of the war. He described the sound - the roar - during the fire as 100 times greater than any artillery bombardment." - Bill Lutz In arguably the most famous fire in American history, a blaze in the southwestern section of Chicago began to burn out of control on the night of October 8, 1871. It had taken about 40 years for Chicago to grow from a small settlement of about 300 people into a thriving metropolis with a population of 300,000, but in just two days in 1871, much of that progress was burned to the ground. Due to the publicity generated by a fire that reduced most of a major American city to ash, the Peshtigo Fire of 1871 might fairly be called America's forgotten disaster. Overshadowed by the much better covered and publicized Great Chicago Fire that occurred on the same evening, the fire that started in the Wisconsin logging town of Peshtigo generated a firestorm unlike anything in American history. In addition to destroying a wide swath of land, it killed at least 1,500 people and possibly as many as 2,500, several times more than the number of casualties in Chicago. While people marveled at the fact that the Great Chicago Fire managed to jump a river, the Peshtigo fire was so intense that it was able to jump several miles across Green Bay. While wondering aloud about the way in which the Peshtigo fire has been overlooked, Bill Lutz noted, "Fires are normally very fascinating to people, but people seem resistant to Peshtigo. Maybe Peshtigo is on such a large scale that people can't comprehend it." Ironically, while Peshtigo is widely forgotten, the fire there is often cited as proof that the Great Chicago Fire was caused by natural phenomena, such as a comet or meteor shower. Those advocating such a theory think it's too coincidental that such disastrous fires were sparked in the same region on the same night, and they point to other fires across the Midwest. Of course, as with the Great Chicago Fire, contemporaries of the Peshtigo fire faulted human error and didn't necessarily link the two fires, if only because fires were a common problem in both Peshtigo and Chicago during the 19th century. The Peshtigo Fire of 1871 chronicles the story America's deadliest fire. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about the Peshtigo fire like never before, in no time at all.
Posted in History

Madison Magazine

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Madison (Wis.)

Page: N.A

View: 3770

Posted in Madison (Wis.)

Ghosts of the Fireground

Echoes of the Great Peshtigo Fire and the Calling of a Wildland Firefighter

Author: Peter M Leschak

Publisher: Open Road Media

ISBN: 1504055934

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 240

View: 2973

In October 1871, a massive forest fire incinerated the town of Peshtigo, Wisconsin. It was the deadliest fire in North American history, an event so intense that its release of energy was not approximated until the advent of thermo-nuclear weapons. At least 1,200 people perished—some in bizarre and disturbing ways—and the actual number of fatalities is unknown, perhaps as many as 1,500 were lost. Since the Great Chicago Fire occurred at the same time, Peshtigo was overshadowed and almost forgotten. In 2000, veteran wild-land firefighter Peter Leschak was faced with a hot and challenging fire season, tasked with the leadership of a helitack crew—an airborne fire team expected to be the “tip of the spear” on wildfire initial attacks. During that long summer he studied Father Peter Pernon’s eyewitness account of the Pehstigo holocaust, and using his knowledge and experience as a firefighter, Leschak placed himself in Pernin’s shoes, as much as possible being transported to the firestorm of 1871. Ghosts of the Fireground tells both tales: the horrific saga of Peshtigo, and the modern battles of a wildfire helicopter crew, seamlessly intertwining the stories to enhance them both.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

Contemporary Authors New Revision Series

A Bio-Bibliographical Guide to Current Writers in Fiction, General Nonfiction, Poetry, Journalism, Drama, Motion Pictures, Television, and Other Fields

Author: Thomson Gale

Publisher: Gale / Cengage Learning

ISBN: 9780787678951

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 440

View: 7111

A biographical and bibliographical guide to current writers in all fields including poetry, fiction and nonfiction, journalism, drama, television and movies. Information is provided by the authors themselves or drawn from published interviews, feature stories, book reviews and other materials provided by the authors/publishers.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

Library Journal

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Libraries

Page: N.A

View: 2186

Includes, beginning Sept. 15, 1954 (and on the 15th of each month, Sept.-May) a special section: School library journal, ISSN 0000-0035, (called Junior libraries, 1954-May 1961). Also issued separately.
Posted in Libraries

Junge Männer im Feuer

Roman

Author: Norman Maclean

Publisher: S. Fischer Verlag

ISBN: 310560958X

Category: Fiction

Page: 378

View: 5229

Am 5. August 1949 setzt ein Flugzeug über den rauhen Bergen von Montana 15 Fallschirmspringer des Forstdienstes ab. Ihre Aufgabe: die Bekämpfung eines zunächst ungefährlich eingestuften Waldbrandes in einer unwegsamen Schlucht. »Smokejumpers« waren die jungen Männer dieser Mannschaft, Feuerspringer, und die meisten von ihnen erstickten, verbrannten oder erlagen ihren schweren Brandwunden. Nur zwei entkamen dem Inferno und überlebten die Katastrophe. Mehr als ein Vierteljahrhundert später greift Norman Maclean die ungeschriebene Geschichte dieses Feuers auf und entdeckt darin alle Elemente einer klassischen Tragödie. (Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine frühere Ausgabe.)
Posted in Fiction

'Their Habits Were Startling'

The Perceptions, Strategies, and Erasing of a Mixed-heritage Family in the Old Northwest

Author: Kathleen Marie Way Thomas

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: 540

View: 2922

Posted in

Notable Natural Disasters: Events to 1970

Author: Marlene Bradford,Robert S. Carmichael

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781587653704

Category: Nature

Page: 1050

View: 3157

Scientific and historical overviews of natural disasters followed by a chronological survey of the worst or most notable disasters in history, including such recent events as the 2004 tsunami and Hurricane Katrina.
Posted in Nature

Fire Management Today

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Forest fires

Page: N.A

View: 8968

Posted in Forest fires

Juli 1914

Der Countdown in den Krieg

Author: Sean McMeekin

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9783944305486

Category:

Page: 557

View: 2505

Posted in