Enemy of the State

The Trial and Execution of Saddam Hussein

Author: Prof. Michael A. Newton,Prof. Michael P. Scharf

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN: 9781429947091

Category: Law

Page: 320

View: 7337

At 12:21 p.m., on October 19, 2005, Saddam Hussein was escorted into the Courtroom of the Iraqi High Tribunal in Baghdad for one of the most important and chaotic trials in history. For a year, two American law professors had led an elite team of experts who prepared the judges and prosecutors for "the mother of all trials." Michael Scharf, a former State Department official who helped create the Yugoslavia Tribunal in 1993, and Michael Newton, then a professor at West Point, would confront such issues as whether the death penalty should apply, how to run a fair trial when political and military passions run so high, and which of Saddam's many crimes should be prosecuted. Newton was in Baghdad in December 2003 when the Tribunal was announced and Saddam was captured. In the following months, Scharf and Newton helped write the rules of the Tribunal, conducted a mock trial in (perhaps appropriately) Stratford-upon-Avon, England, and provided legal analysis on dozens of issues. Newton then returned to Baghdad several times during the trial and appeal. Now, from its two shapers, comes the fascinating inside story of the trial and execution of Saddam Hussein and the attempt to bring the rule of law to post-invasion Iraq.
Posted in Law

Debriefing the President

The Interrogation of Saddam Hussein

Author: John Nixon

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0399575812

Category: Political Science

Page: 242

View: 8508

The first man to conduct a prolonged interrogation of Saddam Hussein after his capture explains why preconceived ideas about the dictator led Washington policymakers and the Bush White House astray.
Posted in Political Science

Jus Post Bellum and Transitional Justice

Author: Larry May,Elizabeth Edenberg

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107512891

Category: Law

Page: N.A

View: 1847

This collection of essays brings together jus post bellum and transitional justice theorists to explore the legal and moral questions that arise at the end of war and in the transition to less oppressive regimes. Transitional justice and jus post bellum share in common many concepts that will be explored in this volume. In both transitional justice and jus post bellum, retribution is crucial. In some contexts criminal trials will need to be held, and in others truth commissions and other hybrid trials will be considered more appropriate means for securing some form of retribution. But there is a difference between how jus post bellum is conceptualized, where the key is securing peace, and transitional justice, where the key is often greater democratization. This collection of essays highlights both the overlap and the differences between these emerging bodies of scholarship and incipient law.
Posted in Law

Zabiba and the King

By Its Author Saddam Hussein

Author: Saddam Hussein,Robert Lawrence

Publisher: Virtualbookworm Publishing

ISBN: 9781589395855

Category: Fiction

Page: 204

View: 1921

"This is an allegorical love story set in the mid-600s to the early 700s between a mighty king (Saddam) and a simple, yet beautiful commoner named Zabiba (the Iraqi people). Zabiba is married to a cruel and unloving husband (the United States) who forces himself upon her."--P. [4] of cover.
Posted in Fiction

Propaganda, War Crimes Trials and International Law

From Speakers' Corner to War Crimes

Author: Predrag Dojcinovic

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113658840X

Category: Law

Page: 314

View: 6870

First Published in 2012. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Posted in Law

What I Heard about Iraq

Author: Eliot Weinberger

Publisher: Verso

ISBN: 9781844670369

Category: Iraq

Page: 75

View: 4170

In an extraordinary montage of facts, sound-bites and testimonies, Weinberger assembles an uncompromising and blackly comic narrative which permits the voices of war to speak for themselves, and allows the protagonists and the apologists to damn themselves in their own words.
Posted in Iraq

The Trial of Saddam Hussein

Author: ʻAbd al-Ḥaqq ʻĀnī

Publisher: SCB Distributors

ISBN: 0932863744

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 421

View: 2755

The trial of Saddam Hussein marks the first time since the UN was created that a head of state has been put on trial by an invading, occupying power. This book, by the UK coordinator of Saddam Hussein's defense team, seeks to alert public attention to the threat this precedent poses to developing nations worldwide, and to its distortive influence on the further development of international law. Al-Ani documents the trail of illegalities marking the destruction of Iraq at the hands of the US and UK, from the genocidal sanctions of the 1990s, the US State Department pre-invasion planning that commenced in 2001, and the 2003 invasion, to the setting up and proceedings of the Tribunal that swiftly dispatched Saddam Hussein. While the Tribunal was intended to promote the image of a triumphant Iraqi democracy, the US was actually in control of all stages of the trial. It drafted the Tribunal's Statute, decided where the trial would be held, and what charges would be brought; researched, compiled, stored, and prevented access to evidence and documentation; elected and trained the judges, and micro-managed the proceedings. Al-Ani follows the trial step by step, detailing its many failures and US micro-management: * Important documents were not given to defense lawyers in advance * no written transcript of the trial was kept * paperwork was lost * The defense was prevented from cross-examining witnesses * judges and numerous witnesses participated incognito, * defense lawyers were intimidated, three were assassinated * defense witnesses were frightened to come forward * defense lawyers could not communicate with their client or review the evidence The trial itself was so farcical as to provoke international condemnation. International human rights groups, including Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch, as well as UN bodies such as the Working Group on Arbitrary Detention and the High Commissioner for Human Rights, have stated that the Iraqi Special Tribunal and its
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

Anatomy of Terror: From the Death of bin Laden to the Rise of the Islamic State

Author: Ali Soufan

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 039324203X

Category: Political Science

Page: 384

View: 5297

"Anyone who wants to understand the world we live in now should read this book." —Lawrence Wright To eliminate the scourge of terrorism, we must first know who the enemy actually is, and what his motivations are. In Anatomy of Terror, former FBI special agent and New York Times best-selling author Ali Soufan dissects Osama bin Laden’s brand of jihadi terrorism and its major offshoots, revealing how these organizations were formed, how they operate, their strengths, and—crucially—their weaknesses. This riveting account examines the new Islamic radicalism through the stories of its flag-bearers, including a U.S. Air Force colonel who once served Saddam Hussein, a provincial bookworm who declared himself caliph of all Muslims, and bin Laden’s own beloved son Hamza, a prime candidate to lead the organization his late father founded. Anatomy of Terror lays bare the psychology and inner workings of al-Qaeda, the Islamic State, and their spawn, and shows how the spread of terror can be stopped. Winner of the Airey Neave Memorial Book Prize
Posted in Political Science

The International Criminal Court and Complementarity

From Theory to Practice

Author: Carsten Stahn,Mohamed M. El Zeidy

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1316139506

Category: Law

Page: N.A

View: 3862

This systematic, contextual and practice-oriented account of complementarity explores the background and historical expectations associated with complementarity, its interpretation in prosecutorial policy and judicial practice, its context (ad hoc tribunals, universal jurisdiction, R2P) and its impact in specific situations (Colombia, Congo, Uganda, Central African Republic, Sudan and Kenya). Written by leading experts from inside and outside the Court and scholars from multiple disciplines, the essays combine theoretical inquiry with policy recommendations and the first-hand experience of practitioners. It is geared towards academics, lawyers and policy-makers who deal with the impact and application of international criminal justice and its interplay with peace and security, transitional justice and international relations.
Posted in Law

A History of Political Trials

From Charles I to Saddam Hussein

Author: John Laughland

Publisher: Peter Lang

ISBN: 9781906165000

Category: History

Page: 315

View: 4187

The modern use of international tribunals to try heads of state for genocide and crimes against humanity is often considered a positive development. Many people think that the establishment of special courts to prosecute notorious dictators represents a triumph of law over impunity. In "A History of Political Trials," John Laughland takes a very different and controversial view. He shows that trials of heads of state are in fact not new, and that previous trials throughout history have themselves violated the law and due process. It is the historical account which carries the argument. By examining trials of heads of state and government throughout history - figures as different as Charles I, Louis XVI, Erich Honecker, and Saddam Hussein - Laughland shows that modern trials of heads of state have ugly historical precedents. In their different ways, all the trials he describes were marked by arbitrariness and injustice, and many were gross exercises in hypocrisy. Political trials, he finds, are only the continuation of war by other means. With short and easy chapters, but the fruit of formidable erudition and wide reading, this book will force the general reader to re-examine prevailing opinions of this subject.
Posted in History

The Prisoner in His Palace

Saddam Hussein, His American Guards, and What History Leaves Unsaid

Author: Will Bardenwerper

Publisher: Scribner

ISBN: 150111784X

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 4057

In the tradition of In Cold Blood and The Executioner’s Song, this haunting, insightful, and surprisingly intimate portrait of Saddam Hussein provides “a brief, but powerful, meditation on the meaning of evil and power” (USA TODAY). The “captivating” (Military Times) The Prisoner in His Palace invites us to take a journey with twelve young American soldiers in the summer of 2006. Shortly after being deployed to Iraq, they learn their assignment: guarding Saddam Hussein in the months before his execution. Living alongside, and caring for, their “high value detainee and regularly transporting him to his raucous trial, many of the men begin questioning some of their most basic assumptions—about the judicial process, Saddam’s character, and the morality of modern war. Although the young soldiers’ increasingly intimate conversations with the once-feared dictator never lead them to doubt his responsibility for unspeakable crimes, the men do discover surprising new layers to his psyche that run counter to the media’s portrayal of him. Woven from firsthand accounts provided by many of the American guards, government officials, interrogators, scholars, spies, lawyers, family members, and victims, The Prisoner in His Palace shows two Saddams coexisting in one person: the defiant tyrant who uses torture and murder as tools, and a shrewd but contemplative prisoner who exhibits surprising affection, dignity, and courage in the face of looming death. In this thought-provoking narrative, Saddam, known as the “man without a conscience,” gets many of those around him to examine theirs. “A singular study exhibiting both military duty and human compassion” (Kirkus Reviews), The Prisoner in His Palace grants us “a behind-the-scenes look at history that’s nearly impossible to put down…a mesmerizing glimpse into the final moments of a brutal tyrant’s life” (BookPage).
Posted in History

Blind Into Baghdad

America's War in Iraq

Author: James Fallows

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307482308

Category: Political Science

Page: 256

View: 8190

In the autumn of 2002, Atlantic Monthly national correspondent James Fallows wrote an article predicting many of the problems America would face if it invaded Iraq. After events confirmed many of his predictions, Fallows went on to write some of the most acclaimed, award-winning journalism on the planning and execution of the war, much of which has been assigned as required reading within the U.S. military. In Blind Into Baghdad, Fallows takes us from the planning of the war through the struggles of reconstruction. With unparalleled access and incisive analysis, he shows us how many of the difficulties were anticipated by experts whom the administration ignored. Fallows examines how the war in Iraq undercut the larger ”war on terror” and why Iraq still had no army two years after the invasion. In a sobering conclusion, he interviews soldiers, spies, and diplomats to imagine how a war in Iran might play out. This is an important and essential book to understand where and how the war went wrong, and what it means for America. From the Trade Paperback edition.
Posted in Political Science

Fractured Lands

How the Arab World Came Apart

Author: Scott Anderson

Publisher: Anchor

ISBN: 0525434445

Category: History

Page: 176

View: 9785

From the bestselling author of Lawrence in Arabia, a piercing account of how the contemporary Arab world came to be riven by catastrophe since the 2003 United States invasion of Iraq. In 2011, a series of anti-government uprisings shook the Middle East and North Africa in what would become known as the Arab Spring. Few could predict that these convulsions, initially hailed in the West as a triumph of democracy, would give way to brutal civil war, the terrors of the Islamic State, and a global refugee crisis. But, as New York Times bestselling author Scott Anderson shows, the seeds of catastrophe had been sown long before. In this gripping account, Anderson examines the myriad complex causes of the region’s profound unraveling, tracing the ideological conflicts of the present to their origins in the United States invasion of Iraq in 2003 and beyond. From this investigation emerges a rare view into a land in upheaval through the eyes of six individuals—the matriarch of a dissident Egyptian family; a Libyan Air Force cadet with divided loyalties; a Kurdish physician from a prominent warrior clan; a Syrian university student caught in civil war; an Iraqi activist for women’s rights; and an Iraqi day laborer-turned-ISIS fighter. A probing and insightful work of reportage, Fractured Lands offers a penetrating portrait of the contemporary Arab world and brings the stunning realities of an unprecedented geopolitical tragedy into crystalline focus.
Posted in History

Proportionality in International Law

Author: Michael A. Newton,Larry May

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0199355037

Category: Law

Page: 339

View: 4744

Proportionality is intimately linked to the overarching concepts of self-defense, lawful force, and the controlled application of violence. It is one of the most visible facets of humanitarian law designed to reduce unnecessary human suffering and avoid excessive damage to property, and the natural environment. However, its application has come under renewed scrutiny and sustained controversy as a result of wars against non-state actors and from the extensive use of drones, human shields, cyber war techniques, and counterinsurgency tactics. Proportionality in International Law critically assesses the law of proportionality in normative terms combining abstract philosophical and legal analysis with highly emotive contemporary combat cases. The principle of proportionality permits actions that are logically linked to the intended goal, and thus defines the permissible boundaries for the initiation and conduct of modern wars. The case studies discussed in this book are predominantly from the perspective of those who make decisions in the midst of armed conflict, bringing analytic rigor to the debates as well as sensitivity to facts on the ground. The authors analyze modern usages of proportionality across a wide range of contexts enabling a more complete comprehension of the values that it preserves. This book contrasts the applications of proportionality in both jus ad bellum (the law and morality of resort to force) and within jus in bello (the doctrines applicable for using force in the midst of conflicts). Proportionality in International Law provides the reader with a unique interdisciplinary approach, offering practitioners and policymakers alike greater clarity over how proportionality should be understood in theory and in practice.
Posted in Law

The Vicar of Baghdad

Fighting for Peace in the Middle East

Author: Andrew White

Publisher: Monarch Books

ISBN: 1854248766

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 191

View: 2430

""I live with a price on my head ...The kind of people that I spend my time engaging with are not usually very nice. On the whole nice people do not cause wars ." Andrew White is one of a tiny handful of people trusted by virtually every side in the complex Middle East. Political and military solutions are constantly put forward, and constantly fail. Andrew offers a different approach, speaking as a man of faith to men of faith. Compassionate and shrewd, gifted in human relationships, he has been deeply involved in the rebuilding of Iraq. His first-hand connections and profound insights make this a fascinating document.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

Assembly

Author: United States Military Academy. Association of Graduates

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 5573

Posted in

A Poisonous Affair

America, Iraq, and the Gassing of Halabja

Author: Joost R. Hiltermann

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521876869

Category: History

Page: 314

View: 4989

In March 1988, during the Iran-Iraq war, thousands were killed in a chemical attack on a town in Iraqi Kurdistan. Both sides accused the other. Gradually it emerged that Saddam Hussein, with the tacit support of his western allies, was responsible. This book tells the story of the gassing of Halabja, and how Iraq amassed chemical weapons to target Iranian soldiers and Kurdish villagers as America looked the other way. Today, as the Middle East sinks further into turmoil, these policies are coming back to haunt the West.
Posted in History

Cruelty and Silence

War, Tyranny, Uprising, and the Arab World

Author: Kanan Makiya

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 9780393311419

Category: History

Page: 367

View: 6413

"One of the most important books ever written on the state of the modern Middle East." --Geraldine Brooks, Wall Street Journal
Posted in History

The Looming Tower

Author: Lawrence Wright

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 9780307266088

Category: Political Science

Page: 480

View: 9380

This Pulitzer Prize winner is the basis for the upcoming Hulu series starring Peter Sarsgaard, Jeff Daniels, and Tahar Rahim. A gripping narrative that spans five decades, The Looming Tower explains in unprecedented detail the growth of Islamic fundamentalism, the rise of al-Qaeda, and the intelligence failures that culminated in the attacks on the World Trade Center. Lawrence Wright re-creates firsthand the transformation of Osama bin Laden and Ayman al-Zawahiri from incompetent and idealistic soldiers in Afghanistan to leaders of the most successful terrorist group in history. He follows FBI counterterrorism chief John O’Neill as he uncovers the emerging danger from al-Qaeda in the 1990s and struggles to track this new threat. Packed with new information and a deep historical perspective, The Looming Tower is the definitive history of the long road to September 11. National Book Award Finalist Updated and with a New Afterword
Posted in Political Science

The International Human Rights Movement

A History

Author: Aryeh Neier

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400841879

Category: Political Science

Page: 392

View: 1277

During the past several decades, the international human rights movement has had a crucial hand in the struggle against totalitarian regimes, cruelties in wars, and crimes against humanity. Today, it grapples with the war against terror and subsequent abuses of government power. In The International Human Rights Movement, Aryeh Neier--a leading figure and a founder of the contemporary movement--offers a comprehensive and authoritative account of this global force, from its beginnings in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries to its essential place in world affairs today. Neier combines analysis with personal experience, and gives a unique insider's perspective on the movement's goals, the disputes about its mission, and its rise to international importance. Discussing the movement's origins, Neier looks at the dissenters who fought for religious freedoms in seventeenth-century England and the abolitionists who opposed slavery before the Civil War era. He pays special attention to the period from the 1970s onward, and he describes the growth of the human rights movement after the Helsinki Accords, the roles played by American presidential administrations, and the astonishing Arab revolutions of 2011. Neier argues that the contemporary human rights movement was, to a large extent, an outgrowth of the Cold War, and he demonstrates how it became the driving influence in international law, institutions, and rights. Throughout, Neier highlights key figures, controversies, and organizations, including Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch, and he considers the challenges to come. Illuminating and insightful, The International Human Rights Movement is a remarkable account of a significant world movement, told by a key figure in its evolution.
Posted in Political Science