Empires, Nations, and Natives

Anthropology and State-Making

Author: Benoît Neiburg,Lygia Maria Sigaud,Benoît de L'Estoile

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822387107

Category: Social Science

Page: 350

View: 5675

Empires, Nations, and Natives is a groundbreaking comparative analysis of the interplay between the practice of anthropology and the politics of empires and nation-states in the colonial and postcolonial worlds. It brings together essays that demonstrate how the production of social-science knowledge about the “other” has been inextricably linked to the crafting of government policies. Subverting established boundaries between national and imperial anthropologies, the contributors explore the role of anthropology in the shifting categorizations of race in southern Africa, the identification of Indians in Brazil, the implementation of development plans in Africa and Latin America, the construction of Mexican and Portuguese nationalism, the genesis of “national character” studies in the United States during World War II, the modernizing efforts of the French colonial administration in Africa, and postcolonial architecture. The contributors—social and cultural anthropologists from the Americas and Europe—report on both historical and contemporary processes. Moving beyond controversies that cast the relationship between scholarship and politics in binary terms of complicity or autonomy, they bring into focus a dynamic process in which states, anthropological knowledge, and population groups themselves are mutually constructed. Such a reflexive endeavor is an essential contribution to a critical anthropological understanding of a changing world. Contributors: Alban Bensa, Marcio Goldman, Adam Kuper, Benoît de L’Estoile, Claudio Lomnitz, David Mills, Federico Neiburg, João Pacheco de Oliveira, Jorge Pantaleón, Omar Ribeiro Thomaz, Lygia Sigaud, Antonio Carlos de Souza Lima, Florence Weber
Posted in Social Science

Empires, Nations, and Families

A History of the North American West, 1800-1860

Author: Anne F. Hyde

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803245831

Category: History

Page: 648

View: 2828

Posted in History

Interpreting Spanish Colonialism

Empires, Nations, and Legends

Author: Christopher Schmidt-Nowara,John M. Nieto-Phillips

Publisher: UNM Press

ISBN: 9780826336736

Category: History

Page: 269

View: 3966

Interpreting Spanish Colonialismoffers a compelling examination of how historians in Spain and the Americas have come to understand and write about the Spanish colonial past and its meanings for national presents. Working from a transnational perspective, the book brings together scholars of Spain, Latin America, the Caribbean, and the United States. The eight essays situate historians' writings within the context of their day, suggesting how "history" has--perhaps more often than not--responded to present-day needs, agendas, and expectations. This collection retraces the link between historiography and nation-building in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. It also explores how and why Spain and its colonies came to be depicted as "backward" and "marginal" to other European and U.S. "modern" regimes. Finally, it questions the contours of contemporary discussions of colonial and postcolonial histories that have remained largely silent about the legacies of centuries of Spanish rule.
Posted in History

2006/2007

A: Autoren-Index. B: Rezensenten-Index. C: Titel-Index. D: Sachgebiets-Index. E: Zeitschriften-Index / International Bibliography of Book Reviews of Scholarly Literature in the Humanities and Social Sciences / Bibliographie internationale de la littérature périodique dans les domaines des...

Author: N.A

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN: 311094149X

Category: Reference

Page: 2832

View: 2737

Die seit 1971 wieder erscheinende, interdisziplinäre, internationale Rezensionsbibliographie IBR ist eine einmalige Informationsquelle. Die Datenbank weist über 1,1 Millionen vornehmlich die Geistes- und Sozialwissenschaften berücksichtigende Buchrezensionen in 6.000 vorwiegend europäischen wissenschaftlichen Zeitschriften nach. 60.000 Eintragungen kommen jedes Jahr hinzu, bieten dem Benutzer Daten zum rezensierten Werk und zur Rezension.
Posted in Reference

The Oxford Handbook of Modern African History

Author: John Parker,Richard Reid

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191667552

Category: History

Page: 560

View: 7212

The Oxford Handbook of Modern African History represents an invaluable tool for historians and others in the field of African studies. This collection of essays, produced by some of the finest scholars currently working in the field, provides the latest insights into, and interpretations of, the history of Africa - a continent with a rich and complex past. An understanding of this past is essential to gain perspective on Africa's current challenges, and this accessible and comprehensive volume will allow readers to explore various aspects - political, economic, social, and cultural - of the continent's history over the last two hundred years. Since African history first emerged as a serious academic endeavour in the 1950s and 1960s, it has undergone numerous shifts in terms of emphasis and approach, changes brought about by political and economic exigencies and by ideological debates. This multi-faceted Handbook is essential reading for anyone with an interest in those debates, and in Africa and its peoples. While the focus is determinedly historical, anthropology, geography, literary criticism, political science and sociology are all employed in this ground-breaking study of Africa's past.
Posted in History

At the Heart of the Empire

Indians and the Colonial Encounter in Late-Victorian Britain

Author: Antoinette Burton

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520919457

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 7424

Antoinette Burton focuses on the experiences of three Victorian travelers in Britain to illustrate how "Englishness" was made and remade in relation to imperialism. The accounts left by these three sojourners—all prominent, educated Indians—represent complex, critical ethnographies of "native" metropolitan society and offer revealing glimpses of what it was like to be a colonial subject in fin-de-siècle Britain. Burton's innovative interpretation of the travelers' testimonies shatters the myth of Britain's insularity from its own construction of empire and shows that it was instead a terrain open to continual contest and refiguration. Burton's three subjects felt the influence of imperial power keenly during even the most everyday encounters in Britain. Pandita Ramabai arrived in London in 1883 seeking a medical education and left in 1886, having resisted the Anglican Church's attempts to make her an evangelical missionary. Cornelia Sorabji went to Oxford to study law and became the first Indian woman to be called to the Bar. Behramji Malabari sought help for his Indian reform projects in England, and subjected London to colonial scrutiny in the process. Their experiences form the basis of this wide-ranging, clearly written, and imaginative investigation of diasporic movement in the colonial metropolis.
Posted in History

Empire’s Twin

U.S. Anti-imperialism from the Founding Era to the Age of Terrorism

Author: Ian Tyrrell,Jay Sexton

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801455693

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 2035

Across the course of American history, imperialism and anti-imperialism have been awkwardly paired as influences on the politics, culture, and diplomacy of the United States. The Declaration of Independence, after all, is an anti-imperial document, cataloguing the sins of the metropolitan government against the colonies. With the Revolution, and again in 1812, the nation stood against the most powerful empire in the world and declared itself independent. As noted by Ian Tyrrell and Jay Sexton, however, American "anti-imperialism was clearly selective, geographically, racially, and constitutionally." Empire's Twin broadens our conception of anti-imperialist actors, ideas, and actions; it charts this story across the range of American history, from the Revolution to our own era; and it opens up the transnational and global dimensions of American anti-imperialism. By tracking the diverse manifestations of American anti-imperialism, this book highlights the different ways in which historians can approach it in their research and teaching. The contributors cover a wide range of subjects, including the discourse of anti-imperialism in the Early Republic and Civil War, anti-imperialist actions in the U.S. during the Mexican Revolution, the anti-imperial dimensions of early U.S. encounters in the Middle East, and the transnational nature of anti-imperialist public sentiment during the Cold War and beyond. Contributors: Laura Belmonte, Oklahoma State University; Robert Buzzanco, University of Houston; Julian Go, Boston University; Alan Knight, University of Oxford; Ussama Makdisi, Rice University; Erez Manela, Harvard University; Peter Onuf, Robert H. Smith International Center for Jefferson Studies, Monticello, and University of Virginia; Jeffrey Ostler, University of Oregon; Patricia Schechter, Portland State University; Jay Sexton, University of Oxford; Ian Tyrrell, University of New South Wales
Posted in History

Masters of Empire

Great Lakes Indians and the Making of America

Author: Michael McDonnell

Publisher: Hill and Wang

ISBN: 0374714185

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 9481

A radical reinterpretation of early American history from a native point of view In Masters of Empire, the historian Michael McDonnell reveals the pivotal role played by the native peoples of the Great Lakes in the history of North America. Though less well known than the Iroquois or Sioux, the Anishinaabeg who lived along Lakes Michigan and Huron were equally influential. McDonnell charts their story, and argues that the Anishinaabeg have been relegated to the edges of history for too long. Through remarkable research into 19th-century Anishinaabeg-authored chronicles, McDonnell highlights the long-standing rivalries and relationships among the great tribes of North America, and how Europeans often played only a minor role in their stories. McDonnell reminds us that it was native people who possessed intricate and far-reaching networks of trade and kinship, of which the French and British knew little. And as empire encroached upon their domain, the Anishinaabeg were often the ones doing the exploiting. By dictating terms at trading posts and frontier forts, they played a crucial role in the making of early America. Through vivid depictions of early conflicts, the French and Indian War, and Pontiac's Rebellion, all from a native perspective, Masters of Empire overturns our assumptions about colonial America and the origins of the Revolutionary War. By calling attention to the Great Lakes as a crucible of culture and conflict, McDonnell reimagines the landscape of American history.
Posted in History

Indians and Colonists at the Crossroads of Empire

The Albany Congress of 1754

Author: Timothy J. Shannon

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9780801488184

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 2463

On the eve of the Seven Years' War in North America, the British crown convened the Albany Congress, an Anglo-Iroquois treaty conference, in response to a crisis that threatened imperial expansion. British authorities hoped to address the impending collapse of Indian trade and diplomacy in the northern colonies, a problem exacerbated by uncooperative, resistant colonial governments. In the first book on the subject in more than forty-five years, Timothy J. Shannon definitively rewrites the historical record on the Albany Congress. Challenging the received wisdom that has equated the Congress and the plan of colonial union it produced with the origins of American independence, Shannon demonstrates conclusively the Congress's importance in the wider context of Britain's eighteenth-century Atlantic empire. In the process, the author poses a formidable challenge to the Iroquois Influence Thesis. The Six Nations, he writes, had nothing to do with the drafting of the Albany Plan, which borrowed its model of constitutional union not from the Iroquois but from the colonial delegates' British cousins.Far from serving as a dress rehearsal for the Constitutional Convention, the Albany Congress marked, for colonists and Iroquois alike, a passage from an independent, commercial pattern of intercultural relations to a hierarchical, bureaucratic imperialism wielded by a distant authority.
Posted in History

From a Multiethnic Empire to a Nation of Nations

Austro-Hungarian Migrants in the US, 1870–1940

Author: Annemarie Steidl,Wladimir Fischer-Nebmaier,James W. Oberly

Publisher: StudienVerlag

ISBN: 3706558726

Category: History

Page: 254

View: 4534

A Transatlantic Experience The book describes the transatlantic experience of migrants from Imperial Austria and the Kingdom of Hungary who arrived in the US from the middle of the nineteenth century up to the outbreak of WWI. Traditional assumptions of mass migration - such as the rapid and easy Americanization of newly arriving Europeans, as well as their strong desire of retaining as much of native culture as possible - have been challenged by recent historical studies. Multiethnic Groups The socio-economic, demographic, and cultural analyses presented in this book offer a much more differentiated picture of the migrants who struggled for new living space amidst hostile industrial environments. This study breaks new ground by examining migration broadly between the Habsburg Monarchy and North America and return migration to Central Europe, including the study of a variety of ethnic and religious groups who originated in different regions. This book offers a scientific investigation of the circumstances under which Austro-Hungarians migrated to the United States in order to find new opportunities while trying to keep up their traditional values.
Posted in History

Revolutionary Negotiations

Indians, Empires, and Diplomats in the Founding of America

Author: Leonard J. Sadosky

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 0813928702

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 2488

Revolutionary Negotiations examines early American diplomatic negotiations with both the European powers and the various American Indian nations from the 1740s through the 1820s. Sadosky interweaves previously distinct settings for American diplomacy—courts and council fires—into one singular, transatlantic system of politics. Whether as provinces in the British Empire or as independent states, American assertions of power were directed simultaneously to the west and to the east—to Native American communities and to European empires across the Atlantic. American leaders aspired to equality with Europeans, who often dismissed them, while they were forced to concede agency to Native Americans, whom they often wished they could ignore. As Americans used diplomatic negotiation to assert their new nation's equality with the great powers of Europe and gradually defined American Indian nations as possessing a different (and lesser) kind of sovereignty, they were also forced to confront the relations between the states in their own federal union. Acts of diplomacy thus defined the founding of America, not only by drawing borders and facilitating commerce, but also by defining and constraining sovereign power in a way that privileged some and weakened others. These negotiations truly were revolutionary.
Posted in History

Empire's Tracks

Indigenous Nations, Chinese Workers, and the Transcontinental Railroad

Author: Manu Karuka

Publisher: University of California Press

ISBN: 0520296648

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 7008

Empire’s Tracks boldly reframes the history of the transcontinental railroad from the perspectives of the Cheyenne, Lakota, and Pawnee Native American tribes, and the Chinese migrants who toiled on its path. In this meticulously researched book, Manu Karuka situates the railroad within the violent global histories of colonialism and capitalism. Through an examination of legislative, military, and business records, Karuka deftly explains the imperial foundations of U.S. political economy. Tracing the shared paths of Indigenous and Asian American histories, this multisited interdisciplinary study connects military occupation to exclusionary border policies, a linked chain spanning the heart of U.S. imperialism. This highly original and beautifully wrought book unveils how the transcontinental railroad laid the tracks of the U.S. Empire.
Posted in History

Nation, Empire, Colony

Historicizing Gender and Race

Author: Ruth Roach Pierson,Nupur Chaudhuri,Beth McAuley

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 9780253113863

Category: Social Science

Page: 328

View: 4320

"... a lively and interesting book... " -- American Historical Review These writers reveal the power relations of gender, class, race, and sexuality at the heart of the imperialisms, colonialisms, and nationalisms that have shaped our modern world. Topics include the (mis)representations of Native women by European colonizers, the violent displacement of women through imperialisms and nationalisms, and the relations between and among feminism, nationalism, imperialism, and colonialism.
Posted in Social Science

Native America

A History

Author: Michael Leroy Oberg

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1118714334

Category: History

Page: 408

View: 9354

This history of Native Americans, from the period of first contactto the present day, offers an important variation to existingstudies by placing the lives and experiences of Native Americancommunities at the center of the narrative. Presents an innovative approach to Native American history byplacing individual native communities and their experiences at thecenter of the study Following a first chapter that deals with creation myths, theremainder of the narrative is structured chronologically, coveringover 600 years from the point of first contact to the presentday Illustrates the great diversity in American Indian culture andemphasizes the importance of Native Americans in the history ofNorth America Provides an excellent survey for courses in Native Americanhistory Includes maps, photographs, a timeline, questions fordiscussion, and “A Closer Focus” textboxes that providebiographies of individuals and that elaborate on the text, exposing students to issues of race, class, and gender
Posted in History

The Middle Ground

Indians, Empires, and Republics in the Great Lakes Region, 1650–1815

Author: Richard White

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139495682

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 9259

An acclaimed book and widely acknowledged classic, The Middle Ground steps outside the simple stories of Indian-white relations - stories of conquest and assimilation and stories of cultural persistence. It is, instead, about a search for accommodation and common meaning. It tells how Europeans and Indians met, regarding each other as alien, as other, as virtually nonhuman, and how between 1650 and 1815 they constructed a common, mutually comprehensible world in the region around the Great Lakes that the French called pays d'en haut. Here the older worlds of the Algonquians and of various Europeans overlapped, and their mixture created new systems of meaning and of exchange. Finally, the book tells of the breakdown of accommodation and common meanings and the re-creation of the Indians as alien and exotic. First published in 1991, the 20th anniversary edition includes a new preface by the author examining the impact and legacy of this study.
Posted in History

Empire and Nation

Selected Essays

Author: Partha Chatterjee

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231526504

Category: Political Science

Page: 384

View: 3295

Partha Chatterjee is one of the world's greatest living theorists on the political, cultural, and intellectual history of nationalism. Beginning in the 1980s, his work, particularly within the context of India, has served as the foundation for subaltern studies, an area of scholarship he continues to develop. In this collection, English-speaking readers are finally able to experience the breadth and substance of Chatterjee's wide-ranging thought. His provocative essays examine the phenomenon of postcolonial democracy and establish the parameters for research in subaltern politics. They include an early engagement with agrarian politics and Chatterjee's brilliant book reviews and journalism. Selections include one never-before-published essay, "A Tribute to the Master," which considers through a mock retelling of an episode from the classic Sanskrit epic, The Mahabharata, a deep dilemma in the study of postcolonial history, and several Bengali essays, now translated into English for the first time. An introduction by Nivedita Menon adds necessary context and depth, critiquing Chatterjee's ideas and their influence on contemporary political thought.
Posted in Political Science

Nature, Empire, and Nation

Explorations of the History of Science in the Iberian World

Author: Jorge Cañizares-Esguerra

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 9780804755443

Category: History

Page: 230

View: 4431

This collection of essays explores two traditions of interpreting and manipulating nature in the early-modern and nineteenth-century Iberian world: one instrumental and imperial, the other patriotic and national. Imperial representations laid the ground for the epistemological transformations of the so-called Scientific Revolutions. The patriotic narratives lie at the core of the first modern representations of the racialized body, Humboldtian theories of biodistribution, and views of the landscape as a historical text representing different layers of historical memory.
Posted in History

Violence Over the Land

Indians and Empires in the Early American West

Author: Ned Blackhawk

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674022904

Category: History

Page: 372

View: 7807

"Blackhawk, a Western Shoshone himself, does not portray the natives as victims. Instead, he demonstrates that their perseverance and ability to adapt to changing conditions over the last two centuries allowed them to help shape the world around them ... This is one of the finest studies available on native peoples of the ggreat basin region." John Burch, Library Journal, from the bookjacket.
Posted in History

The Nature of Empires and the Empires of Nature

Indigenous Peoples and the Great Lakes Environment

Author: Karl S. Hele

Publisher: Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press

ISBN: 1554584213

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 4712

Drawing on themes from John MacKenzie’s Empires of Nature and the Nature of Empires (1997), this book explores, from Indigenous or Indigenous-influenced perspectives, the power of nature and the attempts by empires (United States, Canada, and Britain) to control it. It also examines contemporary threats to First Nations communities from ongoing political, environmental, and social issues, and the efforts to confront and eliminate these threats to peoples and the environment. It becomes apparent that empire, despite its manifestations of power, cannot control or discipline humans and nature. Essays suggest new ways of looking at the Great Lakes watershed and the peoples and empires contained within it.
Posted in History

The Yaquis and the Empire

Violence, Spanish Imperial Power, and Native Resilience in Colonial Mexico

Author: Raphael Brewster Folsom

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300210760

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 6615

This important new book on the Yaqui people of the north Mexican state of Sonora examines the history of Yaqui-Spanish interactions from first contact in 1533 through Mexican independence in 1821. The Yaquis and the Empire is the first major publication to deal with the colonial history of the Yaqui people in more than thirty years and presents a finely wrought portrait of the colonial experience of the indigenous peoples of Mexico's Yaqui River Valley. In examining native engagement with the forces of the Spanish empire, Raphael Brewster Folsom identifies three ironies that emerged from the dynamic and ambiguous relationship of the Yaquis and their conquerors: the strategic use by the Yaquis of both resistance and collaboration; the intertwined roles of violence and negotiation in the colonial pact; and the surprising ability of the imperial power to remain effective despite its general weakness. Published in Cooperation with the William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies, Southern Methodist University
Posted in History