Elegant Solutions

Ten Beautiful Experiments in Chemistry

Author: Philip Ball

Publisher: Royal Society of Chemistry

ISBN: 1782625461

Category: Science

Page: N.A

View: 6050

Devising and performing a scientific experiment is an art, and it is common to hear scientists talk about the 'beauty' of an experiment. What does this mean in chemistry, the experimental science par excellence? And what are the most beautiful chemical experiments of all time? This book offers ten suggestions for where beauty might reside in experimental chemistry. In some cases the beauty lies in the clarity of conception; sometimes it is a feature of the instrumental design. But for chemistry, there can also be a unique beauty in the way atoms are put together to make new molecules, substances not known in nature. The ten experiments described here offer a window into the way that chemists think and work, and how what they do affects the rest of science and the wider world. This book aims to stimulate the reader to think anew about some of the relationships and differences between science and art, and to challenge some of the common notions about particular 'famous experiments'. Elegant Solutions: Ten Beautiful Experiments in Chemistry is accessible to all readers, including those without a scientific background and can provide an unusual point of entry into some of the basic concepts of chemistry. Phillip Ball is a renowned, prolific, award winning science writer.
Posted in Science

The Ten Most Beautiful Experiments

Author: George Johnson

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307268667

Category: Science

Page: 208

View: 3974

A dazzling, irresistible collection of the ten most groundbreaking and beautiful experiments in scientific history. With the attention to detail of a historian and the storytelling ability of a novelist, New York Times science writer George Johnson celebrates these groundbreaking experiments and re-creates a time when the world seemed filled with mysterious forces and scientists were in awe of light, electricity, and the human body. Here, we see Galileo staring down gravity, Newton breaking apart light, and Pavlov studying his now famous dogs. This is science in its most creative, hands-on form, when ingenuity of the mind is the most useful tool in the lab and the rewards of a well-considered experiment are on exquisite display.
Posted in Science

Beauty in Chemistry

Artistry in the Creation of New Molecules

Author: Luigi Fabbrizzi

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 3642283411

Category: Science

Page: 169

View: 4586

The Beauty of Chemistry in the Words of Writers and in the Hands of Scientists, by Margherita Venturi, Enrico Marchi und Vincenzo Balzani Living in a Cage Is a Restricted Privilege, by Luigi Fabbrizzi Inner and Outer Beauty, by Kenneth N. Raymond und Casey J. Brown The Mechanical Bond: A Work of Art, by Carson J. Bruns und J. Fraser Stoddart The Beauty of Knots at the Molecular Level, by Jean-Pierre Sauvage und David B. Amabilino
Posted in Science

The Same and Not the Same

Author: Roald Hoffmann

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 9780231101394

Category: Science

Page: 294

View: 9043

Nobel laureate Roald Hoffman confronts some of the major ethical controversies in chemistry today. Expertly weaving together examples from the worlds of art, literature, and philosophy, Hoffmann illustrates his uniquely accessible dialectic about the creative activity of chemists.
Posted in Science

Chemistry as a Game of Molecular Construction

The Bond-Click Way

Author: Sason Shaik

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1119001447

Category: Science

Page: 416

View: 5234

Chemistry as a Game of Molecular Construction: The Bond-Click Way utilizes an innovative and engaging approach to introduce students to the basic concepts and universal aspects of chemistry, with an emphasis on molecules’ beauty and their importance in our lives. • Offers a unique approach that portrays chemistry as a window into mankind’s material-chemical essence • Reveals the beauty of molecules through the “click” method, a teaching methodology comprised of the process of constructing molecules from building blocks • Styles molecular construction in a way that reveals the universal aspect of chemistry • Allows students to construct molecules, from the simple hydrogen molecule all the way to complex strands of DNA, thereby showing the overarching unity of matter • Provides problems sets and solutions for each chapter
Posted in Science

Galileo's Finger

The Ten Great Ideas of Science

Author: Peter Atkins

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191622508

Category: Science

Page: 400

View: 3752

Any literate person should be familiar with the central ideas of modern science. In his sparkling new book, Peter Atkins introduces his choice of the ten great ideas of science. With wit, charm, patience, and astonishing insights, he leads the reader through the emergence of the concepts, and then presents them in a strikingly effective manner. At the same time, he works into his engaging narrative an illustration of the scientific method and shows how simple ideas can have enormous consequences. His choice of the ten great ideas are: * Evolution occurs by natural selection, in which the early attempts at explaining the origin of species is followed by an account of the modern approach and some of its unsolved problems. * Inheritance is encoded in DNA, in which the story of the emergence of an understanding of inheritance is followed through to the mapping of the human genome. * Energy is conserved, in which we see how the central concept of energy gradually dawned on scientists as they mastered the motion of particles and the concept of heat. * All change is the consequence of the purposeless collapse of energy and matter into disorder, in which the extraordinarily simple concept of entropy is used to account for events in the world. * Matter is atomic, in which we see how the concept of atoms emerged and how the different personalities of the elements arise from the structures of their atoms. * Symmetry limits, guides, and drives, in which we see how concepts related to beauty can be extended to understand the nature of fundamental particles and the forces that act between them. * Waves behave like particles and particles behave like waves, in which we see how old familiar ideas gave way to the extraordinary insights of quantum theory and transformed our perception of matter. * The universe is expanding, in which we see how a combination of astronomy and a knowledge of elementary particles accounts for the origin of the universe and its long term future. * Spacetime is curved by matter, in which we see the emergence of the theories of special and general relativity and come to understand the nature of space and time. * If arithmetic is consistent, then it is incomplete, in which we learn the origin of numbers and arithmetic, see how the philosophy of mathematics lets us understand the nature of this most cerebral of subjects, and are brought to the limits of its power. C. P. Snow once said 'not knowing the second law of thermodynamics is like never having read a work by Shakespeare'. This is an extraordinary, exciting book that not only will make you literate in science but give you deep enjoyment on the way.
Posted in Science

Critical Mass

How One Thing Leads to Another

Author: Philip Ball

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 9780374530419

Category: Philosophy

Page: 520

View: 4224

Ball shows how much can be understood of human behavior when we cease to predict and analyze the behavior of individuals and instead look to the impact of individual decisions--whether in circumstances of cooperation or conflict--on our laws, institutions and customs.
Posted in Philosophy

Chemical Misconceptions

Prevention, Diagnosis and Cure

Author: Keith Taber

Publisher: Royal Society of Chemistry

ISBN: 9780854043866

Category: Science

Page: 180

View: 7970

Part 1 deals with the theory of misconceptions, by including information on some of the key alternative conceptions that have been uncovered by research.
Posted in Science

Made to Measure

New Materials for the 21st Century

Author: Philip Ball

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691009759

Category: Science

Page: 458

View: 9011

This text describes how scientists are inventing thousands of materials, ranging from synthetic skin, blood and bone, to substances that repair themselves and adapt to their environment. It outlines how newly-invented materials will transform our lives in the 21st century.
Posted in Science

Meselson, Stahl, and the Replication of DNA

A History of "The Most Beautiful Experiment in Biology"

Author: Frederic Lawrence Holmes

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300129663

Category: Science

Page: 528

View: 1203

In 1957 two young scientists, Matthew Meselson and Frank Stahl, produced a landmark experiment confirming that DNA replicates as predicted by the double helix structure Watson and Crick had recently proposed. It also gained immediate renown as a “most beautiful” experiment whose beauty was tied to its simplicity. Yet the investigative path that led to the experiment was anything but simple, Frederic L. Holmes shows in this masterful account of Meselson and Stahl’s quest. This book vividly reconstructs the complex route that led to the Meselson-Stahl experiment and provides an inside view of day-to-day scientific research--its unpredictability, excitement, intellectual challenge, and serendipitous windfalls, as well as its frustrations, unexpected diversions away from original plans, and chronic uncertainty. Holmes uses research logs, experimental films, correspondence, and interviews with the participants to record the history of Meselson and Stahl’s research, from their first thinking about the problem through the publication of their dramatic results. Holmes also reviews the scientific community’s reception of the experiment, the experiment’s influence on later investigations, and the reasons for its reputation as an exceptionally beautiful experiment.
Posted in Science

The Public Image of Chemistry

Author: Joachim Schummer,Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent,Brigitte van Tiggelen

Publisher: World Scientific

ISBN: 9812775846

Category: Science

Page: 383

View: 922

Popular associations with chemistry range from poisons, hazards, chemical warfare and environmental pollution to alchemical pseudoscience, sorcery and mad scientists, which gravely affect the public image of science in general. While chemists have merely complained about their public image, social and cultural studies of science have largely avoided anything related to chemistry.This book provides, for the first time, an in-depth understanding of the cultural and historical contexts in which the public image of chemistry has emerged. It argues that this image has been shaped through recurring and unlucky interactions between chemists in popularizing their discipline and nonchemists in expressing their expectations and fears of science. Written by leading scholars from the humanities, social sciences and chemistry in North America, Europe and Australia, this volume explores a blind spot in the science-society relationship and calls for a constructive dialog between scientists and their public.
Posted in Science

Serving the Reich

The Struggle for the Soul of Physics Under Hitler

Author: Philip Ball

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022620457X

Category: History

Page: 303

View: 4026

After World War II, most scientists in Germany maintained that they had been apolitical or actively resisted the Nazi regime, but the true story is much more complicated. In Serving the Reich, Philip Ball takes a fresh look at that controversial history, contrasting the career of Peter Debye, director of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Physics in Berlin, with those of two other leading physicists in Germany during the Third Reich: Max Planck, the elder statesman of physics after whom Germany’s premier scientific society is now named, and Werner Heisenberg, who succeeded Debye as director of the institute when it became focused on the development of nuclear power and weapons. Mixing history, science, and biography, Ball’s gripping exploration of the lives of scientists under Nazism offers a powerful portrait of moral choice and personal responsibility, as scientists navigated “the grey zone between complicity and resistance.” Ball’s account of the different choices these three men and their colleagues made shows how there can be no clear-cut answers or judgement of their conduct. Yet, despite these ambiguities, Ball makes it undeniable that the German scientific establishment as a whole mounted no serious resistance to the Nazis, and in many ways acted as a willing instrument of the state. Serving the Reich considers what this problematic history can tell us about the relationship of science and politics today. Ultimately, Ball argues, a determination to present science as an abstract inquiry into nature that is “above politics” can leave science and scientists dangerously compromised and vulnerable to political manipulation.
Posted in History

Designing the Molecular World

Chemistry at the Frontier

Author: Philip Ball

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691029009

Category: Science

Page: 376

View: 3850

Molecular chemistry.
Posted in Science

Chemical Engineering Progress

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Chemistry, Technical

Page: N.A

View: 9590

Posted in Chemistry, Technical

Curiosity

How Science Became Interested in Everything

Author: Philip Ball

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022604582X

Category: Science

Page: 480

View: 3109

With the recent landing of the Mars rover Curiosity, it seems safe to assume that the idea of being curious is alive and well in modern science—that it’s not merely encouraged but is seen as an essential component of the scientific mission. Yet there was a time when curiosity was condemned. Neither Pandora nor Eve could resist the dangerous allure of unanswered questions, and all knowledge wasn’t equal—for millennia it was believed that there were some things we should not try to know. In the late sixteenth century this attitude began to change dramatically, and in Curiosity: How Science Became Interested in Everything, Philip Ball investigates how curiosity first became sanctioned—when it changed from a vice to a virtue and how it became permissible to ask any and every question about the world. Looking closely at the sixteenth through eighteenth centuries, Ball vividly brings to life the age when modern science began, a time that spans the lives of Galileo and Isaac Newton. In this entertaining and illuminating account of the rise of science as we know it, Ball tells of scientists both legendary and lesser known, from Copernicus and Kepler to Robert Boyle, as well as the inventions and technologies that were inspired by curiosity itself, such as the telescope and the microscope. The so-called Scientific Revolution is often told as a story of great geniuses illuminating the world with flashes of inspiration. But Curiosity reveals a more complex story, in which the liberation—and subsequent taming—of curiosity was linked to magic, religion, literature, travel, trade, and empire. Ball also asks what has become of curiosity today: how it functions in science, how it is spun and packaged for consumption, how well it is being sustained, and how the changing shape of science influences the kinds of questions it may continue to ask. Though proverbial wisdom tell us that it was through curiosity that our innocence was lost, that has not deterred us. Instead, it has been completely the contrary: today we spend vast sums trying to reconstruct the first instants of creation in particle accelerators, out of a pure desire to know. Ball refuses to let us take this desire for granted, and this book is a perfect homage to such an inquisitive attitude.
Posted in Science

Beautiful Data

The Stories Behind Elegant Data Solutions

Author: Toby Segaran,Jeff Hammerbacher

Publisher: "O'Reilly Media, Inc."

ISBN: 144937929X

Category: Computers

Page: 386

View: 9288

In this insightful book, you'll learn from the best data practitioners in the field just how wide-ranging -- and beautiful -- working with data can be. Join 39 contributors as they explain how they developed simple and elegant solutions on projects ranging from the Mars lander to a Radiohead video. With Beautiful Data, you will: Explore the opportunities and challenges involved in working with the vast number of datasets made available by the Web Learn how to visualize trends in urban crime, using maps and data mashups Discover the challenges of designing a data processing system that works within the constraints of space travel Learn how crowdsourcing and transparency have combined to advance the state of drug research Understand how new data can automatically trigger alerts when it matches or overlaps pre-existing data Learn about the massive infrastructure required to create, capture, and process DNA data That's only small sample of what you'll find in Beautiful Data. For anyone who handles data, this is a truly fascinating book. Contributors include: Nathan Yau Jonathan Follett and Matt Holm J.M. Hughes Raghu Ramakrishnan, Brian Cooper, and Utkarsh Srivastava Jeff Hammerbacher Jason Dykes and Jo Wood Jeff Jonas and Lisa Sokol Jud Valeski Alon Halevy and Jayant Madhavan Aaron Koblin with Valdean Klump Michal Migurski Jeff Heer Coco Krumme Peter Norvig Matt Wood and Ben Blackburne Jean-Claude Bradley, Rajarshi Guha, Andrew Lang, Pierre Lindenbaum, Cameron Neylon, Antony Williams, and Egon Willighagen Lukas Biewald and Brendan O'Connor Hadley Wickham, Deborah Swayne, and David Poole Andrew Gelman, Jonathan P. Kastellec, and Yair Ghitza Toby Segaran
Posted in Computers

Candid Science III

More Conversations with Famous Chemists

Author: István Hargittai

Publisher: World Scientific Publishing Company

ISBN: 9781860943379

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 507

View: 8953

"This is the third volume of the Candid Science series"--p.vii.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

Stories of the Invisible

A Guided Tour of Molecules

Author: Philip Ball

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780192803177

Category: Science

Page: 204

View: 2998

What are things made of? 'Everything is composed of small mollycules of itself, and they are flying around in concentric circles and arcs and segments,' explains Sergeant Fottrell in Flann O'Brien's The Dalkey Archive. Philip Ball shows that the world of the molecule is indeed a dynamic place. Using the chemistry of life as a springboard, he provides a new perspective on modern chemical science as a whole. Living cells are full of molecules in motion, communication, cooperation, and competition. Molecular scientists are now starting to capture the same dynamism in synthetic molecular systems, promising to reinvent chemistry as the central creative science of the new century.
Posted in Science

Flow

Nature's Patterns: a Tapestry in Three Parts

Author: Philip Ball

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199604878

Category: Art

Page: 208

View: 3511

Philip Ball explores the elusive rules that govern flow in nature - from the swirl of a wisp of smoke and eddies in rivers, to the huge persistent storm that is the Great Spot on Jupiter. Whether the movement of wind, water, sand, or flocks of birds, he explains the science of the extraordinary forms and patterns that emerge.
Posted in Art

The Devil's Doctor

Paracelsus and the World of Renaissance Magic and Science

Author: Philip Ball

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN: 142992182X

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 448

View: 1757

Philippus Aureolus Theophrastus Bombast von Hohenheim, who called himself Paracelsus, stands at the cusp of medieval and modern times. A contemporary of Luther, an enemy of the medical establishment, a scourge of the universities, an alchemist, an army surgeon, and a radical theologian, he attracted myths even before he died. His fantastic journeys across Europe and beyond were said to be made on a magical white horse, and he was rumored to carry the elixir of life in the pommel of his great broadsword. His name was linked with Faust, who bargained with the devil. Who was the man behind these stories? Some have accused him of being a charlatan, a windbag who filled his books with wild speculations and invented words. Others claim him as the father of modern medicine. Philip Ball exposes a more complex truth in The Devil's Doctor—one that emerges only by entering into Paracelsus's time. He explores the intellectual, political, and religious undercurrents of the sixteenth century and looks at how doctors really practiced, at how people traveled, and at how wars were fought. For Paracelsus was a product of an age of change and strife, of renaissance and reformation. And yet by uniting the diverse disciplines of medicine, biology, and alchemy, he assisted, almost in spite of himself, in the birth of science and the emergence of the age of rationalism. "Ball produces a vibrant, original portrait of a man of contradictions:" - Publishers Weekly
Posted in Biography & Autobiography