Dorking in the Great War

Author: Kathryn Atherton

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 1473825520

Category: History

Page: 160

View: 8690

From Zeppelin raids to housing refugees and evacuees or from men volunteering to fight or women working in the local Gunpowder factory, Dorking in the Great War looks at how the experience of war impacted on the town, from the initial enthusiasm for sorting out the German Kaiser in time for Christmas 1914, to the gradual realization of the enormity of human sacrifice the families of Dorking were committed to as the war stretched out over the next four years. ??The Great War affected everyone. At home there were wounded soldiers in military hospitals, refugees from Belgium and later on German prisoners of war. There were food and fuel shortages and disruption to schooling. The role of women changed dramatically and they undertook a variety of work undreamed of in peacetime. Meanwhile, men serving in the armed forces were scattered far and wide. Extracts from contemporary letters reveal their heroism and give insights into what it was like under battle conditions.
Posted in History

The Battle of Dorking

Author: George Tomkyns Chesney

Publisher: Open Road Media

ISBN: 1497691052

Category: Fiction

Page: 47

View: 4164

Britain is under attack, and winning at Dorking is the only way the empire can be saved It is the late nineteenth century, and a country much like Germany is on the move in Europe. It has already beaten its rivals on the continent and mobilized to the Netherlands, provoking the fear of British citizens. Then the nation strikes. Its powerful weapons destroy the Royal Navy, and invasion cannot be far behind. Written as a hypothetical exercise to raise awareness among average British citizens about the potential danger that a resurgent Germany could pose, The Battle of Dorking earned its place in literary history as the forerunner to the invasion-novel genre, predating The War of the Worlds by almost twenty years. The novel’s drama, which culminates in a fight that will change the course of history forever, thrilled audiences when it was originally released as a serial, and it maintains its power today. This ebook has been professionally proofread to ensure accuracy and readability on all devices.
Posted in Fiction

The Battle of Dorking

Reminiscences of a Volunteer

Author: George Tomkyns Chesney

Publisher: Edinburgh : W. Blackwood and Sons

ISBN: N.A

Category: First person narrative - Great Britain - 19th century

Page: 64

View: 8394

An imaginary story of an invasion and defeat of Great Britain by Germany ca. 1875, inspired by the defeat of France in the Franco-Prussian War.
Posted in First person narrative - Great Britain - 19th century

Yateley in the Great War

Author: Peter J. Tipton

Publisher: Pen & Sword Military

ISBN: 9781473876521

Category:

Page: 176

View: 7653

There were fewer than 500 houses in Yateley in WWI but with Aldershot, Farnborough, Camberley and Sandhurst close by, this Hampshire village's response to the call to arms was more prepared than most, and punched above its weight. Using contemporary evidence from many sources researched by our local history team, the Yateley Society recreates the impact of the War on our predecessors. The story of the men who left Yateley to fight -- territorials, regulars, volunteers and conscripts -- is told alongside that of the battalions of Kitchener's New Armies training in trench warfare on Yateley Common. At the same time, in the three private houses forming the Yateley Military Hospital, Yateley women of all ages were tending wounded soldiers. With its intimate glimpses into village life, this book, will fascinate anyone with Yateley connections. The names of many families in the village of 100 years ago are here, while for recent newcomers with perhaps a Victorian or Edwardian house there may be clues to the history of your homes. With its many illustrations and maps, this exploration of the social network, and social consequences of the Great War on a small community in North East Hampshire has interest for historians and general readers alike.
Posted in

The Great War in England in 1897

Author: William Le Queux

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Great Britain

Page: 330

View: 409

Posted in Great Britain

The War of the Worlds

Author: Herbert George Wells

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Science fiction

Page: 288

View: 2176

H.G. Wells's hugely influential book tracks the exploits of a writer who struggles to survive an alien invasion of Victorian England. After seeing the monstrous Martians firsthand, the narrator attempts to evade their destructive mechanized vehicles and must stay on the run to avoid detection. As he meets other desperate humans, he becomes increasingly pessimistic about any chance of survival. The novel stands as a major milestone in science-fiction literature, inspiring legions of subsequent writers and an endless array of hostile-alien scenarios.
Posted in Science fiction

When William Came

A Story of London Under the Hohenzollerns

Author: Saki

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: London (England)

Page: 322

View: 2176

Posted in London (England)

The Great War in England in 1897

Author: William le Queux

Publisher: Library of Alexandria

ISBN: 1465557083

Category: Great Britain

Page: 330

View: 9527

Posted in Great Britain

Meeting the Enemy

The Human Face of the Great War

Author: Richard van Emden

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1408839814

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 4677

A British soldier walked over to the German front line to deliver newspapers; British women married to Germans became 'enemy aliens' in their own country; a high-ranking British POW discussed his own troops' heroism with the Kaiser on the battlefield. Just three amazing stories of contact between the opposing sides in the Great War that eminent historian Richard van Emden has unearthed ? incidents that show brutality, great humanity, and above all the bizarre nature of a conflict between two nations with long-standing ties of kinship and friendship. Meeting the Enemy reveals for the first time how contact was maintained on many levels throughout the War, and its stories, sometimes funny, often moving, give us a new perspective on the lives of ordinary men and women caught up in extraordinary events.
Posted in History

The Great War in Post-Memory Literature and Film

Author: Martin Löschnigg,Marzena Sokolowska-Paryz

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 311039152X

Category: History

Page: 466

View: 6919

The First World War has remained the subject of prose fiction, drama, and film across nations. This volume provides a comprehensive international survey of the cultural memory of the war as reflected in various media. It addresses the role of these media in preserving and (re)shaping the memory of the war, emphasizing the historical, socio-political, gender-oriented and post-colonial contexts of its cultural representations.
Posted in History

The Great War with Germany, 1890-1914

Fictions and Fantasies of the War-to-come

Author: Ignatius Frederick Clarke

Publisher: Liverpool University Press

ISBN: 9780853236429

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 440

View: 6037

In the second of a series of anthologies on future war stories, the leading specialist in the field presents a selection of prophetic tales about the conflict-to-come between the British and the Germans, tales which had immense influence in the quarter-century before the First World War. An extensive range of contemporary illustrations is included.
Posted in Literary Criticism

Zeppelin Nights

London in the First World War

Author: Jerry White

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1448191939

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 2741

A Guardian Best Book of the Year 2014 11pm, Tuesday 4 August 1914: with the declaration of war London becomes one of the greatest killing machines in human history. Hundreds of thousands of soldiers pass through the capital on their way to the front; wounded men are brought back to be treated in London’s hospitals; and millions of shells are produced in its factories. The war changes London life for ever. Women escape the drudgery of domestic service to work as munitionettes. Full employment puts money into the pockets of the London poor for the first time. Self-appointed moral guardians seize the chance to clamp down on drink, frivolous entertainment and licentious behaviour. As the war drags on, gloom often descends on the capital. And at night London is plunged into darkness for fear of German bombers and Zeppelins that continue to raid the city. Yet despite daily casualty lists, food shortages and enemy bombing, Londoners are determined to get on with their lives and flock to cinemas and theatres, dance halls and shebeens, firmly resolved not to let Germans or puritans spoil their enjoyment. Peopled with patriots and pacifists, clergymen and thieves, bluestockings and prostitutes, Jerry White’s magnificent panorama reveals a struggling yet flourishing city.
Posted in History

The Tale of the Next Great War, 1871-1914

Fictions of Future Warfare and of Battles Still-to-come

Author: Ignatius Frederick Clarke

Publisher: Syracuse University Press

ISBN: 9780815626725

Category: Fiction

Page: 382

View: 6099

This selection of short stories offers a return journey through the future as it used to be. Time speeds backwards to the 1870s - to the alpha point of modern futuristic fiction - the opening years of that enchanted period before the First World War when Jules Verne, H. G. Wells and many able writers delighted readers from Sydney to Seattle with their most original revelations of things-to-come. In all their anticipations, the dominant factor was the recognition that the new industrial societies would continue to evolve in obedience to the rate of change. One major event that caused all to think furiously about the future was the Franco-German War of 1870. The new weapons and the new methods of army organization had shown that the conduct of warfare was changing; and, in response to that perception of change, a new form of fiction took on the task of describing the conduct of the war-to-come.
Posted in Fiction

Englanders and Huns

The Culture-Clash which Led to the First World War

Author: James Hawes

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 0857205307

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 6366

A completely fresh look at the culture clash between Britain and Germany that all but destroyed Europe. Half a century before 1914, most Britons saw the Germans as poor and rather comical cousins - and most Germans looked up to the British as their natural mentors. Over the next five decades, each came to think that the other simply had to be confronted - in Europe, in Africa, in the Pacific and at last in the deadly race to cover the North Sea with dreadnoughts. But why? Why did so many Britons come to see in Germany everything that was fearful and abhorrent? Why did so many Germans come to see any German who called dobbel fohltwhile playing Das Lawn Tennisas the dupe of a global conspiracy? Packed with long-forgotten stories such as the murder of Queen Victoria's cook in Bohn, the disaster to Germany's ironclads under the White Cliffs, bizarre early colonial clashes and the precise, dark moment when Anglophobia begat modern anti-Semitism, this is the fifty-year saga of the tragic, and often tragicomic, delusions and miscalculations that led to the defining cataclysm of our times - the breaking of empires and the womb of horrors, the Great War. Richly illustrated with the words and pictures that formed our ancestors' disastrous opinions, it will forever change the telling of this fateful tale.
Posted in History

The Pity of War

Explaining World War I

Author: Niall Ferguson

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 078672529X

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 9848

In The Pity of War, Niall Ferguson makes a simple and provocative argument: that the human atrocity known as the Great War was entirely England's fault. Britain, according to Ferguson, entered into war based on naïve assumptions of German aims—and England's entry into the war transformed a Continental conflict into a world war, which they then badly mishandled, necessitating American involvement. The war was not inevitable, Ferguson argues, but rather the result of the mistaken decisions of individuals who would later claim to have been in the grip of huge impersonal forces.That the war was wicked, horrific, inhuman,is memorialized in part by the poetry of men like Wilfred Owen and Siegfried Sassoon, but also by cold statistics. More British soldiers were killed in the first day of the Battle of the Somme than Americans in the Vietnam War; indeed, the total British fatalities in that single battle—some 420,000—exceeds the entire American fatalities for both World Wars. And yet, as Ferguson writes, while the war itself was a disastrous folly, the great majority of men who fought it did so with enthusiasm. Ferguson vividly brings back to life this terrifying period, not through dry citation of chronological chapter and verse but through a series of brilliant chapters focusing on key ways in which we now view the First World War.For anyone wanting to understand why wars are fought, why men are willing to fight them, and why the world is as it is today, there is no sharper nor more stimulating guide than Niall Ferguson's The Pity of War.
Posted in History

The Great War, 1914-1918

Author: Marc Ferro

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415267359

Category: History

Page: 267

View: 7222

A landmark history of the war that firmly places the First World War in the context of imperialism and gives due weight to the role of non-Europeans in the conflict.
Posted in History

Civil Service Rifles in the Great War

'All Bloody Gentlemen'

Author: Jill Knight

Publisher: Casemate Publishers

ISBN: 1844152537

Category: World War, 1914-1918

Page: 240

View: 638

Civil servants are not generally known for their soldierly qualities. Yet in the Great War a volunteer regiment of 'civil servants and their friends' served with distinction in the front line, fighting in many of the major battles. This new study, the first since the 1920s, draws on previously unpublished material personal memoirs, diaries and interviews to tell their extraordinary story, and is supported by a wealth of marvellous photographs."
Posted in World War, 1914-1918

Valentine Joe

Author: Rebecca Stevens

Publisher: Chicken House

ISBN: 1909489611

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 160

View: 5338

When fifteen-year-old Rose visits Belgium, she can feel the deep scars left there by the Great War. But when she hears the sound of marching late at night, she does not expect to see the ghosts of the past from her window ... and one boy in particular.
Posted in Juvenile Fiction

The Future of War

A History

Author: Lawrence Freedman

Publisher: PublicAffairs

ISBN: 1610393066

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 6507

Questions about the future of war are a regular feature of political debate, strategic analysis, and popular fiction. Where should we look for new dangers? What cunning plans might an aggressor have in mind? What are the best forms of defense? How might peace be preserved or conflict resolved? From the French rout at Sedan in 1870 to the relentless contemporary insurgencies in Iraq and Afghanistan, Lawrence Freedman, a world-renowned military thinker, reveals how most claims from the military futurists are wrong. But they remain influential nonetheless. Freedman shows how those who have imagined future war have often had an idealized notion of it as confined, brief, and decisive, and have regularly taken insufficient account of the possibility of long wars-hence the stubborn persistence of the idea of a knockout blow, whether through a dashing land offensive, nuclear first strike, or cyberattack. He also notes the lack of attention paid to civil wars until the West began to intervene in them during the 1990s, and how the boundaries between peace and war, between the military, the civilian, and the criminal are becoming increasingly blurred. Freedman's account of a century and a half of warfare and the (often misconceived) thinking that precedes war is a challenge to hawks and doves alike, and puts current strategic thinking into a bracing historical perspective.
Posted in History

Letters of Ralph Vaughan Williams, 1895-1958

Author: Hugh Cobbe

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191615269

Category: Music

Page: 688

View: 4743

The book comprises a selection of some 750 letters of the composer, Ralph Vaughan Williams, selected from an extant corpus of about 3,300. The letters are arranged chronologically and have been chosen to provide a cumulative pen-picture of the composer in his own words. In general the letters reflect VW's major preoccupations: musical, personal and political. It was not VW's way to discuss his inner creative processes but he does discuss his music, once it had been written: for example there is much to illustrate the process of 'washing the face' of his major pieces before, and after, they had reached the concert platform. There is correspondence with collaborators such as Gilbert Murray, Harold Child and Evelyn Sharpe who provided texts; with his publishers (mainly OUP) about printing scores and parts; with conductors such as Adrian Boult and John Barbirolli about performances. He was in regular correspondence with fellow composers such as Gustav Holst, George Butterworth, Gerald Finzi, Herbert Howells, John Ireland, Alan Bush and Rutland Boughton. There were his pupils: Elizabeth Maconchy and Cedric Thorpe Davie amongst others. A series of close personal friendships is well represented: his Cambridge contemporary and cousin Ralph Wedgwood, Edward Dent, and latterly Michael Kennedy. Above all there are insights on his lifelong devotion to his first wife, Adeline, and his growing friendship with Ursula Wood, who was to become his second wife.
Posted in Music