Dickens’s ‘Young Men’

George Augustus Sala, Edmund Yates and the World of Victorian Journalism

Author: P.D. Edwards

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351944355

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 7833

In Dickens's lifetime, and for a generation or so after, Edmund Hodgson Yates and George Augustus Sala were the best known and most successful of his "young men" - the budding writers who acknowledged him as their guide and mentor and whose literary careers the publicity and privately fostered. The book considers their personal and literary relationships with Dickens, with each other, and with other writers of the period, Bohemian and "respectable", including Yates's arch-enemy, his post-office colleague Anthony Trollope. But it also demonstrates that their life and writings - their fiction, private letters and occasional essays in verse and drama, as well as their already recognised contributions to the development of the "new journalism" - are interesting and historically illuminating in their own right, not merely pale reflections of the glory of greater writers. Extensive use is made of previously unpublished material.
Posted in Literary Criticism

Journalism and the Periodical Press in Nineteenth-Century Britain

Author: Joanne Shattock

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 110708573X

Category: Antiques & Collectibles

Page: 448

View: 3096

Newly commissioned essays by leading scholars offer a comprehensive and authoritative overview of the diversity, range and impact of the newspaper and periodical press in nineteenth-century Britain. Essays range from studies of periodical formats in the nineteenth century - reviews, magazines and newspapers - to accounts of individual journalists, many of them eminent writers of the day. The uneasy relationship between the new 'profession' of journalism and the evolving profession of authorship is investigated, as is the impact of technological innovations, such as the telegraph, the typewriter and new processes of illustration. Contributors go on to consider the transnational and global dimensions of the British press and its impact in the rest of the world. As digitisation of historical media opens up new avenues of research, the collection reveals the centrality of the press to our understanding of the nineteenth century.
Posted in Antiques & Collectibles

The Routledge Handbook to Nineteenth-Century British Periodicals and Newspapers

Author: Andrew King,Alexis Easley,John Morton

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317042301

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 476

View: 2803

Providing a comprehensive, interdisciplinary examination of scholarship on nineteenth-century British periodicals, this volume surveys the current state of research and offers researchers an in-depth examination of contemporary methodologies. The impact of digital media and archives on the field informs all discussions of the print archive. Contributors illustrate their arguments with examples and contextualize their topics within broader areas of study, while also reflecting on how the study of periodicals may evolve in the future. The Handbook will serve as a valuable resource for scholars and students of nineteenth-century culture who are interested in issues of cultural formation, transformation, and transmission in a developing industrial and globalizing age, as well as those whose research focuses on the bibliographical and the micro case study. In addition to rendering a comprehensive review and critique of current research on nineteenth-century British periodicals, the Handbook suggests new avenues for research in the twenty-first century.
Posted in Literary Criticism

George Augustus Sala and the Nineteenth-Century Periodical Press

The Personal Style of a Public Writer

Author: Peter Blake

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 131712877X

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 296

View: 5556

In his study of the journalist George Augustus Sala, Peter Blake discusses the way Sala’s personal style, along with his innovations in form, influenced the New Journalism at the end of the nineteenth century. Blake places Sala at the centre of nineteenth-century newspapers and periodicals and examines his prolific contributions to newspapers and periodicals in the context of contemporary debates and issues surrounding his work. Sala’s journalistic style, Blake argues, was a product of the very different mediums in which he worked, whether it was the visual arts, bohemian journalism, novels, pornographic plays, or travel writing. Harkening back to a time when journalism and fiction were closely connected, Blake’s book not only expands our understanding of one of the more prominent and interesting journalists and personalities of the nineteenth century, but also sheds light on prominent nineteenth-century writers and artists such as Charles Dickens, Mathew Arnold, William Powell Frith, Henry Vizetelly, and Mary Elizabeth Braddon.
Posted in Literary Criticism

Women Writers and the Artifacts of Celebrity in the Long Nineteenth Century

Author: Ann R. Hawkins,Maura C. Ives

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 9780754667025

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 280

View: 715

This collection traces the unique experiences of nineteenth-century women writers within a celebrity culture that was intimately connected to the expansion of print technology and of visual and material culture in the nineteenth century. The contributors examine a range of artifacts, including prefaces, portraits, frontispieces, birthday books and even gossip columns, in this suggestive exploration of how nineteenth-century women writers achieved popular, critical and commercial success.
Posted in Literary Criticism

The Oxford History of the Novel in English

Volume 3: The Nineteenth-Century Novel 1820-1880

Author: John Kucich,Jenny Bourne Taylor

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0199560617

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 592

View: 3910

This series presents a comprehensive, global and up-to-date history of English-language prose fiction and written ... by a international team of scholars ... -- dust jacket.
Posted in Literary Criticism

Victorian Periodicals Review

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: English literature

Page: N.A

View: 556

Posted in English literature

Celebrities at Home

Author: Edmund Yates

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Biography

Page: N.A

View: 2918

Posted in Biography

Dickens, Reynolds, and Mayhew on Wellington Street

The Print Culture of a Victorian Street

Author: Mary L. Shannon

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317151143

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 278

View: 6390

A glance over the back pages of mid-nineteenth-century newspapers and periodicals published in London reveals that Wellington Street stands out among imprint addresses. Between 1843 and 1853, Household Words, Reynolds’s Weekly Newspaper, the Examiner, Punch, the Athenaeum, the Spectator, the Morning Post, and the serial edition of London Labour and the London Poor, to name a few, were all published from this short street off the Strand. Mary L. Shannon identifies, for the first time, the close proximity of the offices of Charles Dickens, G.W.M. Reynolds, and Henry Mayhew, examining the ramifications for the individual authors and for nineteenth-century publishing. What are the implications of Charles Dickens, his arch-competitor the radical publisher G.W.M. Reynolds, and Henry Mayhew being such close neighbours? Given that London was capital of more than Britain alone, what connections does Wellington Street reveal between London print networks and the print culture and networks of the wider empire? How might the editors’ experiences make us rethink the ways in which they and others addressed their anonymous readers as ’friends’, as if they were part of their immediate social network? As Shannon shows, readers in the London of the 1840s and '50s, despite advances in literacy, print technology, and communications, were not simply an ’imagined community’ of individuals who read in silent privacy, but active members of an imagined network that punctured the anonymity of the teeming city and even the empire.
Posted in Literary Criticism

Books in Print

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: American literature

Page: N.A

View: 6302

Books in print is the major source of information on books currently published and in print in the United States. The database provides the record of forthcoming books, books in-print, and books out-of-print.
Posted in American literature

Forthcoming Books

Author: Rose Arny

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: American literature

Page: N.A

View: 5235

Posted in American literature

Dickens and Popular Entertainment

Author: Paul Schlicke,Senior Lecturer in English Paul Schlicke

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134997264

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 304

View: 9493

Dickens and Popular Entertainment is the first extended study of this vital aspect of Dicken's life and work. Ranging widely through showmen's memoirs, playbills, advertisements, journals, drawings and imaginative literature, Paul Schlicke explores the ways in which Dickens channelled his love of entertainment into incomparable artistry. Circus, fair, theatre and street performances provided the novelist with subject matter and with the sources of imaginative stimulus essential to his art. Splendidly illustrated with nineteenth-century engravings, many reprinted here for the first time, this study offers a challenging reassessment of Nicholas Nickleby, The Old Curiosity Shop and Hard Times. It shows the important place entertainment held in Dicken's journalism and presents an illuminating perspective on the public readings which dominated the last twelve years of his life.
Posted in Literary Criticism

An Autobiography

Author: Anthony Trollope

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520037229

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 312

View: 2853

Posted in Literary Criticism

Rachel Ray

Trollope's Works

Author: Anthony Trollope

Publisher: 谷月社

ISBN: N.A

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 250

View: 4962

THE RAY FAMILY. There are women who cannot grow alone as standard trees;—for whom the support and warmth of some wall, some paling, some post, is absolutely necessary;—who, in their growth, will bend and incline themselves towards some such prop for their life, creeping with their tendrils along the ground till they reach it when the circumstances of life have brought no such prop within their natural and immediate reach. Of most women it may be said that it would be well for them that they should marry,—as indeed of most men also, seeing that man and wife will each lend the other strength, and yet in lending lose none; but to the women of whom I now speak some kind of marriage is quite indispensable, and by them some kind of marriage is always made, though the union is often unnatural. A woman in want of a wall against which to nail herself will swear conjugal obedience sometimes to her cook, sometimes to her grandchild, sometimes to her lawyer. Any standing corner, post, or stump, strong enough to bear her weight will suffice; but to some standing corner, post, or stump, she will find her way and attach herself, and there will she be married. Such a woman was our Mrs. Ray. As her name imports, she had been married in the way most popular among ladies, with bell, book, and parson. She had been like a young peach tree that, in its early days, is carefully taught to grow against a propitious southern wall. Her natural prop had been found for her, and all had been well. But her heaven had been made black with storms; the heavy winds had come, and the warm sheltering covert against which she had felt herself so safe had been torn away from her branches as they were spreading themselves forth to the fulness of life. She had been married at eighteen, and then, after ten years of wedded security, she had become a widow.
Posted in Literary Collections

Victorian Literature

Author: clement shorter

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 9781721961658

Category:

Page: 492

View: 6295

victorian literature clement shorter In history, we in England have read Prescott and Motley; in poetry we have read Walt Whit man, William Cullen Bryant, John Greenleaf Whittier, and, above all, James Russell Lowell, who endeared himself to us alike as a poet, a critic, and in his own person when he represented the United States at the Court of St James's. Lastly I recall the delight with which as a boy I read the Autocrat of the Breakfast Table, and the joy with which as a man I visited the author, Dr Oliver Wendell Holmes, in his pleasant study in Beacon Street, Boston. These and many other writers have made America and the Americans very dear to Englishmen, and this in spite of much wild and foolish talk in the journals of the two countries. We are delighted to publish this classic book as part of our extensive Classic Library collection. Many of the books in our collection have been out of print for decades, and therefore have not been accessible to the general public. The aim of our publishing program is to facilitate rapid access to this vast reservoir of literature, and our view is that this is a significant literary work, which deserves to be brought back into print after many decades. The contents of the vast majority of titles in the Classic Library have been scanned from the original works. To ensure a high quality product, each title has been meticulously hand curated by our staff. Our philosophy has been guided by a desire to provide the reader with a book that is as close as possible to ownership of the original work. We hope that you will enjoy this wonderful classic work, and that for you it becomes an enriching experience.
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