Curing Queers

Mental Nurses and Their Patients

Author: Tommy Dickinson

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 1784993581

Category:

Page: 272

View: 5753

Drawing on a rich array of source materials including previously unseen, fascinating (and often quite moving) oral histories, archival and news media sources, 'Curing queers' examines the plight of men who were institutionalised in British mental hospitals to receive 'treatment' for homosexuality and transvestism, and the perceptions and actions of the men and women who nursed them. It examines why the majority of the nurses followed orders in administering the treatment in spite of the zero success-rate in 'straightening out' queer men but also why a small number surreptitiously defied their superiors by engaging in fascinating subversive behaviours. 'Curing queers' makes a significant and substantial contribution to the history of nursing and the history of sexuality, bringing together two sub-disciplines that combine only infrequently. It will be of interest to general readers as well as scholars and students in nursing, history, gender studies, and health care ethics and law.
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Medicine, the Penal System and Sexual Crimes in England, 1919-1960s

Diagnosing Deviance

Author: Janet Weston

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1350021083

Category: History

Page: 216

View: 2475

Sexual crime, past and present, is rarely far from the headlines. How these crimes are punished, policed and understood has changed considerably over the last century. From hormone injections to cognitive behavioural therapy, medical and psychological approaches to sexual offenders have proliferated. This book sets out the history of such theories and treatments in England. Beginning in the early 20th century, it traces the evolution of medical interest in the mental state of those convicted of sexual crime. As part of a broader interest in individualised responses to crime as a means to rehabilitation, doctors offered new explanations for some sexual crimes, proposed new solutions, and attempted to deliver new cures. From indecent exposure to homosexuality between men, from sadistic violence to thefts of underwear from washing lines, the interpretation and treatment of some sexual offences was thought to be complex. Of less medical interest, though, were offences against children, prostitution, and rape. Using a range of material, including medical and criminological texts, trial proceedings, government reports, newspapers, and autobiographies and memoirs, Janet Weston offers powerful insights into changing medico-legal practices and attitudes towards sex and health. She highlights the importance of prison doctors and rehabilitative programmes within prisons, psychoanalytically-minded private practitioners, and the interactions between medical and legal systems as medical theories were put into practice. She also reveals the extent and legacy of medical thought, as well as the limitations of a medical approach to sexual crime.
Posted in History

Wolfenden's Witnesses

Homosexuality in Postwar Britain

Author: Brian Lewis

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137321504

Category: History

Page: 316

View: 9837

The Wolfenden Report of 1957 has long been recognized as a landmark in moves towards gay law reform. What is less well known is that the testimonials and written statements of the witnesses before the Wolfenden Committee provide by far the most complete and extensive array of perspectives we have on how homosexuality was understood in mid-twentieth century Britain. Those giving evidence, individually or through their professional associations, included a broad cross-section of official, professional and bureaucratic Britain: police chiefs, policemen, magistrates, judges, lawyers and Home Office civil servants; doctors, biologists (including Alfred Kinsey), psychiatrists, psychoanalysts and psychotherapists; prison governors, medical officers and probation officers; representatives of the churches, morality councils and progressive and ethical societies; approved school headteachers and youth organization leaders; representatives of the army, navy and air force; and a small handful of self-described but largely anonymous homosexuals. This volume presents an annotated selection of their voices.
Posted in History

Monsters in the Closet

Homosexuality and the Horror Film

Author: Harry M. Benshoff

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9780719044731

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 328

View: 9308

Monster in the Closet is a history of the horrors film that explores the genre's relationship to the social and cultural history of homosexuality in America. Drawing on a wide variety of films and primary source materials including censorship files, critical reviews, promotional materials, fanzines, men's magazines, and popular news weeklies, the book examines the historical figure of the movie monster in relation to various medical, psychological, religious and social models of homosexuality. While recent work within gay and lesbian studies has explored how the genetic tropes of the horror film intersect with popular culture's understanding of queerness, this is the first book to examine how the concept of the monster queer has evolved from era to era. From the gay and lesbian sensibilities encoded into the form and content of the classical Hollywood horror film, to recent films which play upon AIDS-related fears. Monster in the Closet examines how the horror film started and continues, to demonize (or quite literally "monsterize") queer sexuality, and what the pleasures and "costs" of such representations might be both for individual spectators and culture at large.
Posted in Performing Arts

Heading North

The North of England in Film and Television

Author: Ewa Mazierska

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 331952500X

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 305

View: 1802

This collection presents a number of films and television programmes set in the North of England in an investigation of how northern identity imbricates with class, race, gender, rural and urban identities. Heading North considers famous screen images of the North, such as Coronation Street and Kes (1969), but the main purpose is to examine its lesser known facets. From Mitchell and Kenyon’s ‘Factory Gate’ films to recent horror series In the Flesh, the authors analyse how the dominant narrative of the North of England as an ‘oppressed region’ subordinated to the economically and politically powerful South of England is challenged. The book discusses the relationship between the North of England and the rest of the world and should be of interest to students of British cinema and television, as well as to those broadly interested in its history and culture.
Posted in Performing Arts

Mental health nursing

The working lives of paid carers, 1800s-1900s

Author: Anne Borsay,Pamela Dale

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 1784992151

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 6697

This book seeks to integrate the history of mental health nursing with the wider history of institutional and community care. It develops new research questions by drawing together a concern with exploring the class, gender, skills and working conditions of practitioners with an assessment of the care regimes staff helped create and patients' experiences of them. Such an approach aims to correct the neglect of mental health workers in recent histories of nursing and care. Contributors from a range of disciplines use a variety of source material to examine both continuity and change in the history of care over two centuries. The rise of the professional nurse is an important part of the narrative, but the detailed studies in this volume reveal that the working lives of paid carers were always shaped by wider social, economic and political forces. Most of the chapters concentrate on Britain and Ireland but an Australian contribution provides useful insight into how these models of care were exported and understood in a colonial context. The case studies engage with classic history of nursing texts but also develop new perspectives that are brought together in a comprehensive introduction. The book benefits from a foreword by Mick Carpenter who thoughtfully locates the work within traditional and new literature debates. It will appeal to researchers and students interested in all aspects of the history of nursing and the history of care. The book is also designed to be accessible to practitioners and the general reader.
Posted in History

Medical History: Some Perspectives

Author: Donald E. Greydanus

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN: 1352002728

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 4233

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Gaysia

Adventures in the Queer East

Author: Benjamin Law

Publisher: Cleis Press

ISBN: 162778036X

Category: Travel

Page: 283

View: 5552

A gay Asian-Australian man wonders what his life would be like if he grew up in Asia, so he travels to several Asian countries and investigates gay culture in Indonesia, Thailand, China, Japan, Malaysia, Myanmar, and India.
Posted in Travel

The Man Who Closed the Asylums

Franco Basaglia and the Revolution in Mental Health Care

Author: John Foot

Publisher: Verso Books

ISBN: 1781689288

Category: Political Science

Page: 424

View: 1544

When the wind of the 1960s blew through the world of psychiatry In 1961, when Franco Basaglia arrived outside the grim walls of the Gorizia asylum, on the Italian border with Yugoslavia, it was a place of horror, a Bedlam for the mentally sick and excluded, redolent of Basaglia’s own wartime experience inside a fascist gaol. Patients were frequently restrained for long periods, and therapy was largely a matter of electric and insulin shocks. The corridors stank, and for many of the interned the doors were locked for life. This was a concentration camp, not a hospital. Basaglia, the new Director, was expected to practise all the skills of oppression in which he had been schooled, but he would have none of this. The place had to be closed down by opening it up from the inside, bringing freedom and democracy to the patients, the nurses and the psychiatrists working in that “total institution.” Inspired by the writings of authors such as Primo Levi, R.D. Laing, Erving Goffman, Michel Foucault and Frantz Fanon, and the practices of experimental therapeutic communities in the UK, Basaglia’s seminal work as a psychiatrist and campaigner in Gorizia, Parma and Trieste fed into and substantially contributed to the national and international movement of 1968. In 1978 a law was passed (the “Basaglia law”) which sanctioned the closure of the entire Italian asylum system. The first comprehensive study of this revolutionary approach to mental health care, The Man Who Closed the Asylums is a gripping account of one of the most influential movements in twentieth-century psychiatry, which helped to transform the way we see mental illness. Basaglia’s work saved countless people from a miserable existence, and his legacy persists, as an object lesson in the struggle against the brutality and ignorance that the establishment peddles to the public as common sense. From the Hardcover edition.
Posted in Political Science

Queer African Reader

Author: Hakima Abbas,Sokari Ekine

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780857490995

Category: Social Science

Page: 454

View: 9191

As the double jeopardy of homophobia and transphobia, and western imperialism, threaten to silence the voices of African lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) people, the Queer African Reader is a testament to the resistance and unrelenting power of these communities across Africa and her Diaspora. The Queer African Reader brings together academic writings, political analysis, life testimonies, conversations and artistic works by Africans that engage with the struggle for LGBTI liberation. The book aims to engage the audience from the perspective that various axes of identity - gender, race and class and others - interact to contribute to social inequality. It includes experiences from diverse African contexts and breaks away from the homogenisation of Africa as the homophobic continent to highlight the complexities of LGBTI lives and experiences through their own voices. Contributions from across the continent explore issues of identity, resistance, solidarity, pinkwashing, global politics, intersections of struggle, religion and culture, community, sex and love
Posted in Social Science

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Queer Psychology

An Introduction

Author: Victoria Clarke,Sonja J. Ellis,Elizabeth Peel,Damien W. Riggs

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 113948723X

Category: Psychology

Page: N.A

View: 9787

This exciting and engaging textbook introduces students to the psychology of lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and queer lives and experiences. It covers a broad range of topics including diversity, prejudice, health, relationships, parenting and lifespan experiences from youth to old age. The book includes 'key researcher' boxes, which outline the contributions of significant individuals and their motivations for conducting their research in their own words. Key issues and debates are discussed throughout the book, and questions for discussion and classroom exercises help students reflect critically and apply their learning. There are extensive links to further resources and information, as well as 'gaps and absences' sections, indicating major limitations of research in a particular area. This is the essential textbook for anyone studying LGBTQ psychology, psychology of sexuality or related courses. It is also a useful supplement to courses on gender and developmental psychology.
Posted in Psychology

Riding Fury Home

A Memoir

Author: Chana Wilson

Publisher: Seal Press

ISBN: 1580054536

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 384

View: 4643

In 1958, when Chana Wilson was seven, her mother attempted suicide, holding a rifle to her own head and pulling the trigger. The gun jammed and she was taken away to a mental hospital. On her return, Chana became the caretaker of her heavily medicated, suicidal mother. It would be many years before she learned the secret of her mother’s anguish: her love affair with another married woman, and the psychiatric treatment aimed at curing her of her lesbianism. Riding Fury Home spans forty years of the intense, complex relationship between Chana and her mother—the trauma of their early years together, the transformation and joy they found when they both came out in the 1970s, and the deep bond that grew between them. From the intolerance of the ‘50s to the exhilaration of the women’s movement of the ‘70s and beyond, the book traces the profound ways in which their two lives were impacted by the social landscape of their time. Exquisitely written and devastatingly honest, Riding Fury Home is a shattering account of one family’s struggle against homophobia and mental illness—and a powerful story of healing, forgiveness, and redemption.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

The Man Who Would Be Queen

The Science of Gender-Bending and Transsexualism

Author: J. Michael Bailey

Publisher: Joseph Henry Press

ISBN: 0309505542

Category: Science

Page: 219

View: 5344

Gay. Straight. Or lying. It’s as simple and straightforward as black or white, right? Or is there a gray area, where the definitions of sex and gender become blurred or entirely refocused with the deft and practiced use of a surgeon’s knife? For some, the concept of gender – the very idea we have of ourselves as either male or female beings – is neither simple nor straightforward. Written by cutting-edge researcher and sex expert J. Michael Bailey, The Man Who Would Be Queen is a frankly controversial, intensely poignant, and boldly forthright book about sex and gender. Based on his original research, Bailey’s book is grounded firmly in science. But as he demonstrates, science doesn’t always deliver predictable or even comfortable answers. Indeed, much of what he has to say will be sure to generate as many questions as it does answers. Are gay men genuinely more feminine than other men? And do they really prefer to be hairdressers rather than lumberjacks? Are all male transsexuals women trapped in men’s bodies – or are some of them men who are just plain turned on by the idea of becoming a woman? And how much of a role do biology and genetics play in sexual orientation? But while Bailey’s science is provocative, it is the portraits of the boys and men who struggle with these questions – and often with anger, fear, and hurt feelings – that will move you. You will meet Danny, an eight-year old boy whose favorite game is playing house and who yearns to dress up as a princess for Halloween. And Martin, an expert makeup artist who was plagued by inner turmoil as a youth but is now openly homosexual and has had many men as sex partners. And Kim, a strikingly sexy transsexual who still has a penis and works as a dancer and a call girl for men who like she-males while she awaits sex reassignment surgery. These and other stories make it clear that there are men – and men who become women – who want only to understand themselves and the society that makes them feel like outsiders. That there are parents, friends, and families that seek answers to confusing and complicated questions. And that there are researchers who hope one day to grasp the very nature of human sexuality. As the striking cover image – a distinctly muscular and obviously male pair of legs posed in a pair of low-heeled pumps – makes clear, the concept of gender, the very idea we have of ourselves as either male or female beings, is neither simple nor straightforward for some.
Posted in Science

Cures

A Gay Man's Odyssey, Tenth Anniversary Edition

Author: Martin Duberman

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 0786750200

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 6808

This is the tenth anniversary edition of Cures: A Gay Man’s Odyssey, Martin Duberman’s classic memoir of growing up gay in pre-Stonewall America. The tale of his desperate struggle to "cure” himself of his homosexuality through psychotherapy is utterly frank and deeply moving. But Cures is more than one man’s story; it’s the vivid, witty account of a generation, of changing times, shifting social attitudes, and the rising tide of protest against received wisdom. For this tenth anniversary edition, Duberman has written a substantial new afterword that updates both his personal history and the ongoing struggle for a more just society.
Posted in Social Science

How to Survive a Summer

A Novel

Author: Nick White

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0399573690

Category: Fiction

Page: 352

View: 1261

A searing debut novel centering around a gay-to-straight conversion camp in Mississippi and a man's reckoning with the trauma he faced there as a teen. Grad student Will Dillard has largely buried memories of the summer he spent at a camp intended to “cure” homosexuality. But when he finds out a horror movie based on the camp is hitting theaters, he’s forced to face his past—and his role in another camper’s death. As he recounts the events surrounding his “failed rehabilitation,” Will strikes out on an impromptu road trip back home to Mississippi, eventually returning to the abandoned campgrounds to solve the mysteries of that pivotal summer. With a masterful confluence of sensibility and place, How to Survive a Summer introduces an exciting new literary voice from the American South.
Posted in Fiction

George Fox and Early Quaker Culture

Author: Hilary Hinds

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 1847794599

Category: Religion

Page: 272

View: 6425

What was distinctive about the founding principles and practices of Quakerism? In George Fox and Early Quaker Culture, Hilary Hinds explores how the Light Within became the organizing principle of this seventeenth-century movement, inaugurating an influential dissolution of the boundary between the human and the divine. Taking an original perspective on this most enduring of radical religious groups, Hinds combines literary and historical approaches to produce a fresh study of Quaker cultural practice. Close readings of Fox's Journal are put in dialogue with the voices of other early Friends and their critics to argue that the Light Within set the terms for the unique Quaker mode of embodying spirituality and inhabiting the world. In this important study of the cultural consequences of a bedrock belief, Hinds shows how the Quaker spiritual self was premised on a profound continuity between sinful subjects and godly omnipotence. This study will be of interest not only to scholars and students of seventeenth-century literature and history, but also to those concerned with the Quaker movement, spirituality and the changing meanings of religious practice in the early modern period.
Posted in Religion

Broken Mirror

Author: Cody Sisco

Publisher: Resonant Earth Publishing via PublishDrive

ISBN: 0997034815

Category: Fiction

Page: 524

View: 8017

Broken Mirror: the start of a smart, complex, and imaginative cyberpunk alternate history saga. Literary science fiction from a fresh, young voice. In a mirror universe, a mentally ill young man searches for his grandfather's killer. Someone killed Grandfather Jefferson. Victor is sure of it. But he's the only one. Diagnosed with mirror resonance syndrome and shunned by Semiautonomous California society, Victor suffers from "blank outs," hallucinations, and vivid nightmares. He violently overreacts to even minor confrontations. Victor's grandfather devoted his life to researching and curing mentally ill Broken Mirrors like Victor, but now that he's gone, Victor must walk a narrow path between sanity and reclassification--a fate that all but guarantees he'll lose his freedom. Victor is determined to uncover the truth about his grandfather's death and grows increasingly suspicious of the medicine he must take to help manage his "symptoms." As he tries to sort his allies from his enemies, a conspiracy with global implications emerges. Can he trust his Aunt Circe, the only person in his family who's even somewhat sympathetic to his plight? His former classmate-turned-brainhacker Ozie, who wields information as damaging as any weapon and who seems intent on luring Victor away from his home? What about his old friend Elena, who reappears in his life abruptly, claiming to have miraculously overcome a devastating addiction? With its self-driving cars, global firearms ban, and a cure for cancer, the world of Broken Mirror may sound utopic, but history has taken a few wrong turns. The American Union is a weak and fractious alliance of nations in decline. Europe, a superpower, manipulates its citizens through technology. And Asia is reeling from decades of war. Amid shifting geopolitical sands, Broken Mirrors like Victor find themselves at a crossroads: evolve or go extinct. Broken Mirror is the first novel in a sci-fi detective saga tailor-made for fans of Isaac Asimov, Haruki Murakami, and Neal Stephenson.
Posted in Fiction

The Italian Boy

A Tale of Murder and Body Snatching in 1830s London

Author: Sarah Wise

Publisher: Metropolitan Books

ISBN: 1466867809

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 5407

A thrilling history of England's great metropolis at a point of great change, told through the story of a young vagrant murdered by "resurrection men" Before his murder in 1831, the "Italian boy" was one of thousands of orphans on the streets of London, moving among the livestock, hawkers, and con men, begging for pennies. When his body was sold to a London medical college, the suppliers were arrested for murder. Their high-profile trial would unveil London's furtive trade in human corpses carried out by body-snatchers--or "resurrection men"--who killed to satisfy the first rule of the cadaver market: the fresher the body, the higher the price. Historian Sarah Wise reconstructs not only the boy's murder but the chaos and squalor of London that swallowed the fourteen-year-old vagrant long before his corpse appeared on the slab. In 1831, the city's poor were desperate and the wealthy were petrified, the population swelling so fast that old class borders could not possibly hold. All the while, early humanitarians were pushing legislation to protect the disenfranchised, the courts were establishing norms of punishment and execution, and doctors were pioneering the science of human anatomy. Vivid and intricate, The Italian Boy restores to history the lives of the very poorest Londoners and offers an unparalleled account of the sights, sounds, and smells of a city at the brink of a major transformation.
Posted in History

Science, Politics and Society in Early Nineteenth-cCentury Ireland

The Reverend William Richardson

Author: Allan Blackstock

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 1526111810

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 5731

This book examines the pivotal period immediately after the Irish Union from the unique perspective of the Reverend William Richardson (1740-1820). A clerical polymath, Richardson's activities ranged from Ulster politics to international scientific debates. His private correspondence adds to our knowledge of central Ulster before and during the 1798 rebellion and provides insights into the tensions between Irish provincial science and the metropolitan scientific world. The book is based on extensive primary research, including material new to Irish historiography, and follows the political and scientific themes of Richardson's career in a broadly chronological sweep, assessing the role of various shaping features, including religion, politics, personality and Enlightenment ideology, and analysing each theme in terms of its broad contemporary historical significance. This book will appeal to students and academics with an interest in the period, or politics, religion or science.
Posted in History

The Dharma Bums

Author: Jack Kerouac

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9780140042528

Category: Fiction

Page: 244

View: 1915

During the 1950s the search for Buddhist truths takes two young Bohemians through a series of bizarre experiences in California
Posted in Fiction