Crossing Parish Boundaries

Race, Sports, and Catholic Youth in Chicago, 1914-1954

Author: Timothy B. Neary

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022638876X

Category: History

Page: 293

View: 8529

It s widely understood that mid-century working-class white-ethnic Catholics in Chicago were among the most virulent racists imaginable. But is this the complete picture? Without denying the hatred shown by some Catholics, Timothy Neary brings to light the range and extent of overtly integrationist efforts of Catholic clergy, especially those of the Catholic Youth Organization led by Bishop Bernard Sheil between 1930 and 1954key years in the demographic transformation of the South Side of the city. Neary details the multiethnic and ecumenical programs designed to draw in children from different races, religions, and neighborhoods, trying to break down the social and geographic barriers that fueled fears and hostilities. These particularly included sports leagues (notably boxing) and social and educational programs. While these efforts did not, ultimately, bring about integration, Neary shows that the intents and actions of schools and churches in this fraught period are more complex than we may have thought."
Posted in History

Authentically Black and Truly Catholic

The Rise of Black Catholicism in the Great Migration

Author: Matthew J. Cressler

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 1479841323

Category: Religion

Page: 288

View: 3025

Explores the contentious debates among Black Catholics about the proper relationship between religious practice and racial identity Chicago has been known as the Black Metropolis. But before the Great Migration, Chicago could have been called the Catholic Metropolis, with its skyline defined by parish spires as well as by industrial smoke stacks and skyscrapers. This book uncovers the intersection of the two. Authentically Black and Truly Catholic traces the developments within the church in Chicago to show how Black Catholic activists in the 1960s and 1970s made Black Catholicism as we know it today. The sweep of the Great Migration brought many Black migrants face-to-face with white missionaries for the first time and transformed the religious landscape of the urban North. The hopes migrants had for their new home met with the desires of missionaries to convert entire neighborhoods. Missionaries and migrants forged fraught relationships with one another and tens of thousands of Black men and women became Catholic in the middle decades of the twentieth century as a result. These Black Catholic converts saved failing parishes by embracing relationships and ritual life that distinguished them from the evangelical churches proliferating around them. They praised the “quiet dignity” of the Latin Mass, while distancing themselves from the gospel choirs, altar calls, and shouts of “amen!” increasingly common in Black evangelical churches. Their unique rituals and relationships came under intense scrutiny in the late 1960s, when a growing group of Black Catholic activists sparked a revolution in U.S. Catholicism. Inspired by both Black Power and Vatican II, they fought for the self-determination of Black parishes and the right to identify as both Black and Catholic. Faced with strong opposition from fellow Black Catholics, activists became missionaries of a sort as they sought to convert their coreligionists to a distinctively Black Catholicism. This book brings to light the complexities of these debates in what became one of the most significant Black Catholic communities in the country, changing the way we view the history of American Catholicism.
Posted in Religion

Newsprint Metropolis

City Papers and the Making of Modern Americans

Author: Julia Guarneri

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022634133X

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 8851

Julia Guarneri's book considers turn-of-the-century newspapers in New York, Philadelphia, Milwaukee, and Chicago not just as vessels of information but as active agents in the creation of cities and of urban culture. Guarneri argues that newspapers sparked cultural, social, and economic shifts that transformed a rural republic into a nation of cities, and that transformed rural people into self-identified metropolitans and moderns. The book pays closest attention to the content and impact of "feature news," such as advice columns, neighborhood tours, women's pages, comic strips, and Sunday magazines. While papers provided a guide to individual upward mobility, they also fostered a climate of civic concern and responsibility. Editors drew in new reading audiences--women, immigrants, and working-class readers--giving rise to the diverse, contentious, and commercial public sphere of the twentieth century.
Posted in History

Parish Boundaries

The Catholic Encounter with Race in the Twentieth-Century Urban North

Author: John T. McGreevy

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226558745

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 2027

Steeples topped by crosses still dominate neighborhood skylines in many American cities, silent markers of local worlds rarely examined by historians. In Parish Boundaries, John McGreevy chronicles the history of these Catholic parishes and connects their unique place in the urban landscape to the course of American race relations in the twentieth century.
Posted in History

Selling the Race

Culture, Community, and Black Chicago, 1940-1955

Author: Adam Green

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226306410

Category: History

Page: 306

View: 7492

"In his study, Green tells the story of how this unified consciousness was shaped. With this portrayal of black life - complemented by a dozen works of the Chicago photographer Wayne F. Miller - Green ultimately presents African Americans as agents, rather than casualties, of modernity, reenvisioning urban existence in a way that will resonate with anyone interested in race, culture, or the life of cities."--Jacket.
Posted in History

Black Picket Fences

Privilege and Peril Among the Black Middle Class

Author: Mary Pattillo-McCoy

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226649290

Category: Social Science

Page: 276

View: 1822

Black Picket Fences is a stark, moving, and candid look at a section of America that is too often ignored by both scholars and the media: the black middle class. The result of living for three years in "Groveland," a black middle-class neighborhood on Chicago's South Side, sociologist Mary Pattillo-McCoy has written a book that explores both the advantages and the boundaries that exist for members of the black middle class. Despite arguments that race no longer matters, Pattillo-McCoy shows a different reality, one where black and white middle classes remain separate and unequal. "An insightful look at the socio-economic experiences of the black middle class. . . . Through the prism of a South Side Chicago neighborhood, the author shows the distinctly different reality middle-class blacks face as opposed to middle-class whites." —Ebony "A detailed and well-written account of one neighborhood's struggle to remain a haven of stability and prosperity in the midst of the cyclone that is the American economy." —Emerge
Posted in Social Science

Beyond C. L. R. James

Shifting Boundaries of Race and Ethnicity in Sports

Author: John Nauright,Alan G. Gobley,David K. Wiggins

Publisher: University of Arkansas Press

ISBN: 1557286493

Category: Social Science

Page: 400

View: 1518

A collection of essays that analyze the interconnections between race, ethnicity, and sport.
Posted in Social Science

Sapiens

A Brief History of Humankind

Author: Yuval Noah Harari

Publisher: Signal

ISBN: 9780771038518

Category:

Page: 464

View: 9092

Destined to become a modern classic in the vein of Guns, Germs, and Steel, Sapiens is a lively, groundbreaking history of humankind told from a unique perspective. 100,000 years ago, at least six species of human inhabited the earth. Today there is just one. Us. Homo Sapiens. How did our species succeed in the battle for dominance? Why did our foraging ancestors come together to create cities and kingdoms? How did we come to believe in gods, nations, and human rights; to trust money, books, and laws; and to be enslaved by bureaucracy, timetables, and consumerism? And what will our world be like in the millennia to come? In Sapiens, Dr. Yuval Noah Harari spans the whole of human history, from the very first humans to walk the earth to the radical -- and sometimes devastating -- breakthroughs of the Cognitive, Agricultural, and Scientific Revolutions. Drawing on insights from biology, anthropology, palaeontology, and economics, he explores how the currents of history have shaped our human societies, the animals and plants around us, and even our personalities. Have we become happier as history has unfolded? Can we ever free our behaviour from the heritage of our ancestors? And what, if anything, can we do to influence the course of the centuries to come? Bold, wide-ranging and provocative, Sapiens challenges everything we thought we knew about being human: our thoughts, our actions, our power...and our future.
Posted in

What Parish Are You From?

A Chicago Irish Community and Race Relations

Author: Eileen M. McMahon

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 9780813170541

Category: Social Science

Page: 226

View: 5915

For Irish Americans, as for Chicago's other ethnic groups, the local parish once formed the nucleus of daily life. Focusing on the parish of St. Sabina's in southwest Chicago, Eileen McMahon takes a penetrating look at the response of Catholic ethnics to life in twentieth century America.
Posted in Social Science

The Anti-Journalist

Karl Kraus and Jewish Self-Fashioning in Fin-de-Siècle Europe

Author: Paul Reitter

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226709728

Category: Religion

Page: 256

View: 7696

In turn-of-the-century Vienna, Karl Kraus created a bold new style of media criticism, penning incisive satires that elicited both admiration and outrage. Kraus’s spectacularly hostile critiques often focused on his fellow Jewish journalists, which brought him a reputation as the quintessential self-hating Jew. The Anti-Journalist overturns this view with unprecedented force and sophistication, showing how Kraus’s criticisms form the center of a radical model of German-Jewish self-fashioning, and how that model developed in concert with Kraus’s modernist journalistic style. Paul Reitter’s study of Kraus’s writings situates them in the context of fin-de-siècle German-Jewish intellectual society. He argues that rather than stemming from anti-Semitism, Kraus’s attacks constituted an innovative critique of mainstream German-Jewish strategies for assimilation. Marshalling three of the most daring German-Jewish authors—Kafka, Scholem, and Benjamin—Reitter explains their admiration for Kraus’s project and demonstrates his influence on their own notions of cultural authenticity. The Anti-Journalist is at once a new interpretation of a fascinating modernist oeuvre and a heady exploration of an important stage in the history of German-Jewish thinking about identity.
Posted in Religion

Media and the American Mind

From Morse to McLuhan

Author: Daniel J. Czitrom

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807841075

Category: Social Science

Page: 254

View: 6141

In a fascinating and comprehensive intellectual history of modern communication in America, Daniel Czitrom examines the continuing contradictions between the progressive possibilities that new communications technologies offer and their use as instruments
Posted in Social Science

Distinction

A Social Critique of the Judgement of Taste

Author: Pierre Bourdieu

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113587316X

Category: Philosophy

Page: 640

View: 7923

No judgement of taste is innocent - we are all snobs. Pierre Bourdieu's Distinction brilliantly illuminates the social pretentions of the middle classes in the modern world, focusing on the tastes and preferences of the French bourgeoisie. First published in 1979, the book is at once a vast ethnography of contemporary France and a dissection of the bourgeois mind. In the course of everyday life we constantly choose between what we find aesthetically pleasing, and what we consider tacky, merely trendy, or ugly. Taste is not pure. Bourdieu demonstrates that our different aesth
Posted in Philosophy

O God of Players

The Story of the Immaculata Mighty Macs

Author: Julie Byrne

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231127480

Category: Religion

Page: 291

View: 1744

Looks at the history of the Immaculata Mighty Macs through a collection of surveys and interviews with more than 130 former players and others affiliated with the program.
Posted in Religion

Daughters of the Church

A Popular History of the Daughters of Charity in the United States, 1809-1987

Author: Daniel Hannefin

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Religion

Page: 347

View: 2226

Posted in Religion

The History of Youth Work in Europe

Relevance for Youth Policy Today

Author: Griet Verschelden,Youth Partnership (Organization)

Publisher: Council of Europe

ISBN: 9789287166081

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 179

View: 8039

V.2. Youth work histories of Belgium, the Netherlands, Ireland, Wales and Hungary.
Posted in Business & Economics

Freedom's Ballot

African American Political Struggles in Chicago from Abolition to the Great Migration

Author: Margaret Garb

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022613606X

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 6546

In the spring of 1915, Chicagoans elected the city’s first black alderman, Oscar De Priest. In a city where African Americans made up less than five percent of the voting population, and in a nation that dismissed and denied black political participation, De Priest’s victory was astonishing. It did not, however, surprise the unruly group of black activists who had been working for several decades to win representation on the city council. Freedom’s Ballot is the history of three generations of African American activists—the ministers, professionals, labor leaders, clubwomen, and entrepreneurs—who transformed twentieth-century urban politics. This is a complex and important story of how black political power was institutionalized in Chicago in the half-century following the Civil War. Margaret Garb explores the social and political fabric of Chicago, revealing how the physical makeup of the city was shaped by both political corruption and racial empowerment—in ways that can still be seen and felt today.
Posted in History

Crucibles of Black Empowerment

Chicago's Neighborhood Politics from the New Deal to Harold Washington

Author: Jeffrey Helgeson

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022613072X

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 2031

The term “community organizer” was deployed repeatedly against Barack Obama during the 2008 presidential campaign as a way to paint him as an inexperienced politician unfit for the presidency. The implication was that the job of a community organizer wasn’t a serious one, and that it certainly wasn’t on the list of credentials needed for a presidential résumé. In reality, community organizers have played key roles in the political lives of American cities for decades, perhaps never more so than during the 1970s in Chicago, where African Americans laid the groundwork for further empowerment as they organized against segregation, discrimination, and lack of equal access to schools, housing, and jobs. In Crucibles of Black Empowerment, Jeffrey Helgeson recounts the rise of African American political power and activism from the 1930s onward, revealing how it was achieved through community building. His book tells stories of the housewives who organized their neighbors, building tradesmen who used connections with federal officials to create opportunities in a deeply discriminatory employment sector, and the social workers, personnel managers, and journalists who carved out positions in the white-collar workforce. Looking closely at black liberal politics at the neighborhood level in Chicago, Helgeson explains how black Chicagoans built the networks that eventually would overthrow the city’s seemingly invincible political machine.
Posted in History

Monuments to Absence

Cherokee Removal and the Contest over Southern Memory

Author: Andrew Denson

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469630842

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 8151

The 1830s forced removal of Cherokees from their southeastern homeland became the most famous event in the Indian history of the American South, an episode taken to exemplify a broader experience of injustice suffered by Native peoples. In this book, Andrew Denson explores the public memory of Cherokee removal through an examination of memorials, historic sites, and tourist attractions dating from the early twentieth century to the present. White southerners, Denson argues, embraced the Trail of Tears as a story of Indian disappearance. Commemorating Cherokee removal affirmed white possession of southern places, while granting them the moral satisfaction of acknowledging past wrongs. During segregation and the struggle over black civil rights, removal memorials reinforced whites' authority to define the South's past and present. Cherokees, however, proved capable of repossessing the removal memory, using it for their own purposes during a time of crucial transformation in tribal politics and U.S. Indian policy. In considering these representations of removal, Denson brings commemoration of the Indian past into the broader discussion of race and memory in the South.
Posted in History

English as a Global Language

Author: David Crystal

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107611806

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 212

View: 4566

David Crystal's classic English as a Global Language considers the history, present status and future of the English language, focusing on its role as the leading international language. English has been deemed the most 'successful' language ever, with 1500 million speakers internationally, presenting a difficult task to those who wish to investigate it in its entirety. However, Crystal explores the subject in a measured but engaging way, always backing up observations with facts and figures. Written in a detailed and fascinating manner, this is a book written by an expert both for specialists in the subject and for general readers interested in the English language.
Posted in Language Arts & Disciplines

The culture of calamity

disaster and the making of modern America

Author: Kevin Rozario

Publisher: University Of Chicago Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 313

View: 7872

Turn on the news and it looks as if we live in a time and place unusually consumed by the specter of disaster. The events of 9/11 and the promise of future attacks, Hurricane Katrina and the destruction of New Orleans, and the inevitable consequences of environmental devastation all contribute to an atmosphere of imminent doom. But reading an account of the San Francisco earthquake of 1906, with its vivid evocation of buildings “crumbling as one might crush a biscuit,” we see that calamities—whether natural or man-made—have long had an impact on the American consciousness. Uncovering the history of Americans’ responses to disaster from their colonial past up to the present, Kevin Rozario reveals the vital role that calamity—and our abiding fascination with it—has played in the development of this nation. Beginning with the Puritan view of disaster as God’s instrument of correction, Rozario explores how catastrophic events frequently inspired positive reactions. He argues that they have shaped American life by providing an opportunity to take stock of our values and social institutions. Destruction leads naturally to rebuilding, and here we learn that disasters have been a boon to capitalism, and, paradoxically, indispensable to the construction of dominant American ideas of progress. As Rozario turns to the present, he finds that the impulse to respond creatively to disasters is mitigated by a mania for security. Terror alerts and duct tape represent the cynical politician’s attitude about 9/11, but Rozario focuses on how the attacks registered in the popular imagination—how responses to genuine calamity were mediated by the hyperreal thrills of movies; how apocalyptic literature, like the best-selling Left Behind series, recycles Puritan religious outlooks while adopting Hollywood’s style; and how the convergence of these two ways of imagining disaster points to a new postmodern culture of calamity. The Culture of Calamity will stand as the definitive diagnosis of the peculiarly American addiction to the spectacle of destruction.
Posted in History