Conscience and Convenience

The Asylum and Its Alternatives in Progressive America

Author: David J. Rothman

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351526537

Category: History

Page: 482

View: 7891

Conscience and Convenience was quickly recognized for its masterly depiction and interpretation of a major period of reform history. This history begins in a social context in which treatment and rehabilitation were emerging as predominant after America's prisons and asylums had been broadly acknowledged to be little more than embarrassing failures. The resulting progressive agenda was evident: to develop new, more humane and effective strategies for the criminal, delinquent, and mentally ill. The results, as Rothman documents, did not turn out as reformers had planned.For adult criminal offenders, such individual treatment could be accomplished only through the provision of broad discretionary authority, whereby choices could be made between probation, parole, indeterminate sentencing, and, as a measure of last resort, incarceration in totally redesigned prisons. For delinquents, the juvenile court served as a surrogate parent and accelerated and intensified individual treatment by providing for a series of community-based individual and family services, with the newly designed, school-like reformatories being used for only the most intractable cases. For the mentally ill, psychiatrists chose between outpatient treatments, short-term intensive care, or as last resort, long-term care in mental hospitals with new cottage and family-like arrangements. Rothman shows the consequences of these reforms as unmitigated disasters. Despite benevolent intentions, the actual outcome of reform efforts was to take the earlier failures of prisons and asylums to new, more ominous heights.In this updated edition, Rothman chronicles and examines incarceration of the criminal, the deviant, and the dependent in U.S. society, with a focus on how and why these methods have persisted and expanded for over a century and a half despite longstanding evidence of their failures and abuses.
Posted in History

The Punishment Imperative

The Rise and Failure of Mass Incarceration in America

Author: Todd R. Clear,Natasha A. Frost

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 1479851698

Category: Social Science

Page: 269

View: 8916

Over the last 40 years, the US penal system has grown at an unprecedented rate—five times larger than in the past and grossly out of scale with the rest of the world. In The Punishment Imperative, eminent criminologists Todd R. Clear and Natasha A. Frost argue that America’s move to mass incarceration from the 1960s to the early 2000s was more than just a response to crime or a collection of policies adopted in isolation; it was a grand social experiment. Tracing a wide array of trends related to the criminal justice system, this book charts the rise of penal severity in America and speculates that a variety of forces—fiscal, political, and evidentiary—have finally come together to bring this great social experiment to an end. The authors stress that while the doubling of the crime rate in the late 1960s represented one of the most pressing social problems at the time, it was instead the way crime posed a political problem—and thereby offered a political opportunity—that became the basis for the great rise in punishment. Clear and Frost contend that the public’s growing realization that the severe policies themselves, not growing crime rates, were the main cause of increased incarceration eventually led to a surge of interest in taking a more rehabilitative, pragmatic, and cooperative approach to dealing with criminal offenders that still continues to this day. Part historical study, part forward-looking policy analysis, The Punishment Imperative is a compelling study of a generation of crime and punishment in America.
Posted in Social Science

Theoretical Criminology

Author: Morrison

Publisher: Cavendish Publishing

ISBN: 1843140527

Category: Law

Page: 518

View: 6192

Posted in Law

Professional Lives of Community Corrections Officers: The Invisible Side of Reentry

Author: Faith E. Lutze

Publisher: SAGE Publications

ISBN: 1483322467

Category: Social Science

Page: 296

View: 5069

One of the first contemporary works to bring together research focused on community corrections officers, Professional Lives of Community Corrections Officers: The Invisible Side of Reentry, by Faith E. Lutze, helps readers understand the importance of community corrections officers to the success of the criminal justice system. The author brings the important work of these officers out from the shadows of the prison and into the light of informed policymaking, demonstrating how their work connects to the broader political, economic, and social context. Arguing that they are “street-level boundary spanners” who are in the best position to lead effective reentry initiatives built on interagency collaboration, the author shows how community corrections officers can effectively lead a fluid response to reentry that is inclusive of control, support, and treatment. This supplement is ideal for community corrections or probation and parole courses to supplement core textbooks.
Posted in Social Science

The Discovery of the Asylum

Social Order and Disorder in the New Republic

Author: David J. Rothman

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351483641

Category: History

Page: 380

View: 3996

This is a masterful effort to recognize and place the prison and asylums in their social contexts. Rothman shows that the complexity of their history can be unraveled and usefully interpreted. By identifying the salient influences that converged in the tumultuous 1820s and 1830s that led to a particular ideology in the development of prisons and asylums, Rothman provides a compelling argument that is historically informed and socially instructive. He weaves a comprehensive story that sets forth and portrays a series of interrelated events, influences, and circumstances that are shown to be connected to the development of prisons and asylums. Rothman demonstrates that meaningful historical interpretation must be based upon not one but a series of historical events and circumstances, their connections and ultimate consequences. Thus, the history of prisons and asylums in the youthful United States is revealed to be complex but not so complex that it cannot be disentangled, described, understood, and applied.This reissue of a classic study addresses a core concern of social historians and criminal justice professionals: Why in the early nineteenth century did a single generation of Americans resort for the first time to institutional care for its convicts, mentally ill, juvenile delinquents, orphans, and adult poor? Rothman's compelling analysis links this phenomenon to a desperate effort by democratic society to instill a new social order as it perceived the loosening of family, church, and community bonds. As debate persists on the wisdom and effectiveness of these inherited solutions, The Discovery of the Asylum offers a fascinating reflection on our past as well as a source of inspiration for a new century of students and professionals in criminal justice, corrections, social history, and law enforcement.
Posted in History

Punishment for Sale

Private Prisons, Big Business, and the Incarceration Binge

Author: Donna Selman,Paul Leighton

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

ISBN: 1442201746

Category: Law

Page: 216

View: 8961

Punishment for Sale is the definitive modern history of private prisons, told through social, economic and political frames. The authors explore the origin of the ideas of modern privatization, the establishment of private prisons, and the efforts to keep expanding in the face of problems and bad publicity. The book provides a balanced telling of the story of private prisons and the resistance they engendered within the context of criminology, and it is intended for supplemental use in undergraduate and graduate courses in criminology, social problems, and race & ethnicity.
Posted in Law

Criminology and Justice

Author: N.A

Publisher: McGraw-Hill College

ISBN: N.A

Category: Social Science

Page: 692

View: 4124

This introduction to criminology, designed for course in criminology offered at two and four schools, is one of the most comprehensive, and well-researched books on the market. For use in both Sociology and Criminal Justice departments, this text offers detailed coverage of theories and types of crime.
Posted in Social Science

Discipline & Punish

The Birth of the Prison

Author: Michel Foucault

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307819299

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

View: 7084

In this brilliant work, the most influential philosopher since Sartre suggests that such vaunted reforms as the abolition of torture and the emergence of the modern penitentiary have merely shifted the focus of punishment from the prisoner's body to his soul.
Posted in Social Science

Criminal Justice in America

A Critical View

Author: Randall G. Shelden,William Bud Brown

Publisher: Allyn & Bacon

ISBN: N.A

Category: Law

Page: 413

View: 8682

This text helps students understand controversial issues of racial and economic inequities found in the criminal justice system, offering an alternative interpretation of criminal justice that is rarely presented in traditional textbooks. After overviews of the criminal justice system and the proble
Posted in Law

Special Problems in Corrections

Author: Jeffrey Ian Ross

Publisher: Prentice Hall

ISBN: 9780131138742

Category: Law

Page: 259

View: 5212

Sets out to identify the most pressing issues affecting the correctional system today. Maintaining a solutions-focus, the book organizes problems into two distinct categories: those impacting the convicts and correctional facilities and those impacting the correctional officers and administrators. It examines long-standing, and emerging issues from a critical perspective, grounding discussion in empirical research and current events. Using the consistent voice of a single author, the book offers a no nonsense approach to explaining the problems of correctional officers, correctional managers, prisoners, and the public.
Posted in Law

Juvenile Delinquency

Author: Clemens Bartollas

Publisher: Allyn & Bacon

ISBN: N.A

Category: Social Science

Page: 554

View: 676

A comprehensive, cutting-edge overview of all aspects of juvenile delinquency with a sociological focus.
Posted in Social Science

Annual Review of Sociology

1986

Author: Ralph H. Turner

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780824322120

Category: Social Science

Page: 498

View: 6417

Posted in Social Science

Creating born criminals

Author: Nicole Hahn Rafter

Publisher: Univ of Illinois Pr

ISBN: N.A

Category: Medical

Page: 284

View: 605

But Creating Born Criminals is much more than a look at the past. It is an exploration of the role of biological explanation as a form of discourse and of its impact upon society. While The Bell Curve and other recent books have stopped short of making eugenic recommendations, their contentions point toward eugenic conclusions, and people familiar with the history of eugenics can hear in them its echoes. Rafter demonstrates that we need to know how eugenic reasoning worked in the past and that we must recognize the dangers posed by the dominance of a theory that interprets social problems in biological terms and difference as biological inferiority.
Posted in Medical

Justice quarterly

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Social Science

Page: N.A

View: 5398

Posted in Social Science

The uncertain landscape of election law

symposium held at New York University School of Law, February 23, 2007

Author: New York University. School of Law

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Election law

Page: 806

View: 4395

Posted in Election law

Criminal justice

Author: Joel Samaha

Publisher: West Publishing Company

ISBN: 9780314025418

Category: Law

Page: 675

View: 9021

Posted in Law

Sapiens

A Brief History of Humankind

Author: Yuval Noah Harari

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN: 0062316109

Category: Science

Page: 464

View: 5891

New York Times Bestseller A Summer Reading Pick for President Barack Obama, Bill Gates, and Mark Zuckerberg From a renowned historian comes a groundbreaking narrative of humanity’s creation and evolution—a #1 international bestseller—that explores the ways in which biology and history have defined us and enhanced our understanding of what it means to be “human.” One hundred thousand years ago, at least six different species of humans inhabited Earth. Yet today there is only one—homo sapiens. What happened to the others? And what may happen to us? Most books about the history of humanity pursue either a historical or a biological approach, but Dr. Yuval Noah Harari breaks the mold with this highly original book that begins about 70,000 years ago with the appearance of modern cognition. From examining the role evolving humans have played in the global ecosystem to charting the rise of empires, Sapiens integrates history and science to reconsider accepted narratives, connect past developments with contemporary concerns, and examine specific events within the context of larger ideas. Dr. Harari also compels us to look ahead, because over the last few decades humans have begun to bend laws of natural selection that have governed life for the past four billion years. We are acquiring the ability to design not only the world around us, but also ourselves. Where is this leading us, and what do we want to become? Featuring 27 photographs, 6 maps, and 25 illustrations/diagrams, this provocative and insightful work is sure to spark debate and is essential reading for aficionados of Jared Diamond, James Gleick, Matt Ridley, Robert Wright, and Sharon Moalem.
Posted in Science