Colored Amazons

Crime, Violence, and Black Women in the City of Brotherly Love, 1880–1910

Author: Kali N. Gross

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822337997

Category: History

Page: 260

View: 1963

For the state, black female crime and its representations effectively galvanized and justified a host of urban reform initiatives that reaffirmed white, middle-class authority."--Jacket.
Posted in History

Hannah Mary Tabbs and the Disembodied Torso

A Tale of Race, Sex, and Violence in America

Author: Kali Nicole Gross

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190241217

Category: History

Page: 220

View: 5863

Shortly after a dismembered torso was discovered by a pond outside Philadelphia in 1887, investigators homed in on two suspects: Hannah Mary Tabbs, a married, working-class, black woman, and George Wilson, a former neighbor whom Tabbs implicated after her arrest. As details surrounding the shocking case emerged, both the crime and ensuing trial brought otherwise taboo subjects such as illicit sex, adultery, and domestic violence in the black community to public attention. At the same time, the mixed race of the victim and one of his assailants exacerbated anxieties over the purity of whiteness in the post-Reconstruction era.
Posted in History

Talk with You Like a Woman

African American Women, Justice, and Reform in New York, 1890-1935

Author: Cheryl D. Hicks

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807834246

Category: Social Science

Page: 372

View: 6829

With this book, Cheryl Hicks brings to light the voices and viewpoints of black working-class women, especially southern migrants, who were the subjects of urban and penal reform in early twentieth-century New York. Hicks compares the ideals of racial upl
Posted in Social Science

Mark Z. Danielewski's House of Leaves

Author: Mark Z. Danielewski,Zampan?o

Publisher: Pantheon

ISBN: 0375420525

Category: Fiction

Page: 709

View: 6063

A family relocates to a small house on Ash Tree Lane and discovers that the inside of their new home seems to be without boundaries
Posted in Fiction

Up South

Civil Rights and Black Power in Philadelphia

Author: Matthew J. Countryman

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812220025

Category: History

Page: 417

View: 8525

Up South documents the efforts of Philadelphia's Black Power activists to construct a vital and effective social movement combining analyses of racism with a program of grassroots community organizing in the context of the failure of civil rights liberalism to deliver on its promise of racial equality.
Posted in History

Hypospadias Surgery

An Illustrated Guide

Author: Ahmed Hadidi,David A. Montgomery

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 3662078414

Category: Medical

Page: 375

View: 4485

Acknowledging the fact that hypospadiology has become a true subspecialty, this unique book highlights and explores current philosophy and different principles and techniques of hypospadias repair. It offers an excellent practical guide to all surgeons involved in the management of this common, but troublesome disease. The aim is to help interested surgeons to develop vision, philosophy and talent rather than just enumerate techniques. It is well illustrated with ample colour diagrams and photographs of various operations together with many technical tips. All surgeons in training will benefit by reading this book in preparing for their higher examinations and their surgical training. There is a wide diversity of opinions, and a large number of operations have been described. Here, the team of world class authors present an expert overview on the management of this condition.
Posted in Medical

Hannah Mary Tabbs and the Disembodied Torso

A Tale of Race, Sex, and Violence in America

Author: Kali Nicole Gross

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190860014

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 2256

Shortly after a dismembered torso was discovered by a pond outside Philadelphia in 1887, investigators homed in on two suspects: Hannah Mary Tabbs, a married, working-class, black woman, and George Wilson, a former neighbor whom Tabbs implicated after her arrest. As details surrounding the shocking case emerged, both the crime and ensuing trial--which spanned several months--were featured in the national press. The trial brought otherwise taboo subjects such as illicit sex, adultery, and domestic violence in the black community to public attention. At the same time, the mixed race of the victim and one of his assailants exacerbated anxieties over the purity of whiteness in the post-Reconstruction era. In Hannah Mary Tabbs and the Disembodied Torso, historian Kali Nicole Gross uses detectives' notes, trial and prison records, local newspapers, and other archival documents to reconstruct this ghastly whodunit crime in all its scandalous detail. In doing so, she gives the crime context by analyzing it against broader evidence of police treatment of black suspects and violence within the black community. A fascinating work of historical recreation, Hannah Mary Tabbs and the Disembodied Torso is sure to captivate anyone interested in true crime, adulterous love triangles gone wrong, and the racially volatile world of post-Reconstruction Philadelphia.
Posted in History

Amazons & Warriors

Adult Coloring Book

Author: AUSXIP Coloring

Publisher: Ausxip Publishing

ISBN: 9780994476500

Category: Art

Page: 94

View: 2747

Amazons & Warriors Adult Coloring Book Volume 1 is a great way to relax and unwind. Inspired by the legendary fierce Greek Amazons and other female warriors throughout history. You will find 40 illustrations to color of warriors from myth and history. Find a quiet spot, turn off the TV and your phone. This is your time and relaxing with this mix of female power and strength. Time to break out the pencils and start to relax and refresh ourselves by coloring.
Posted in Art

The Condemnation of Blackness

Author: Khalil Gibran Muhammad

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674062116

Category: History

Page: 392

View: 9752

"The Idea of Black Criminality was crucial to the making of modern urban America. Khalil Gibran Muhammad chronicles how, when, and why modern notions of black people as an exceptionally dangerous race of criminals first emerged. Well known are the lynch mobs and racist criminal justice practices in the South that stoked white fears of black crime and shaped the contours of the New South. In this illuminating book, Muhammad shifts our attention to the urban North as a crucial but overlooked site for the production and dissemination of those ideas and practices. Following the 1890 census - the first to measure the generation of African Americans born after slavery - crime statistics, new migration and immigration trends, and symbolic references to America as the promised land were woven into a cautionary tale about the exceptional threat black people posed to modern urban society. Excessive arrest rates and overrepresentation in northern prisons were seen by many whites - liberals and conservatives, northerners and southerners - as indisputable proof of blacks' inferiority. What else but pathology could explain black failure in the land of opportunity? Social scientists and reformers used crime statistics to mask and excuse anti-black racism, violence, and discrimination across the nation, especially in the urban North. The Condemnation of Blackness is the most thorough historical account of the enduring link between blackness and criminality in the making of modern urban America. It is a startling examination of why the echoes of America's Jim Crow past continue to resonate in 'color-blind' crime rhetoric today."--Book jacket.
Posted in History

The Amazons

Lives and Legends of Warrior Women across the Ancient World

Author: Adrienne Mayor

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400865131

Category: History

Page: 536

View: 8341

Amazons—fierce warrior women dwelling on the fringes of the known world—were the mythic archenemies of the ancient Greeks. Heracles and Achilles displayed their valor in duels with Amazon queens, and the Athenians reveled in their victory over a powerful Amazon army. In historical times, Cyrus of Persia, Alexander the Great, and the Roman general Pompey tangled with Amazons. But just who were these bold barbarian archers on horseback who gloried in fighting, hunting, and sexual freedom? Were Amazons real? In this deeply researched, wide-ranging, and lavishly illustrated book, National Book Award finalist Adrienne Mayor presents the Amazons as they have never been seen before. This is the first comprehensive account of warrior women in myth and history across the ancient world, from the Mediterranean Sea to the Great Wall of China. Mayor tells how amazing new archaeological discoveries of battle-scarred female skeletons buried with their weapons prove that women warriors were not merely figments of the Greek imagination. Combining classical myth and art, nomad traditions, and scientific archaeology, she reveals intimate, surprising details and original insights about the lives and legends of the women known as Amazons. Provocatively arguing that a timeless search for a balance between the sexes explains the allure of the Amazons, Mayor reminds us that there were as many Amazon love stories as there were war stories. The Greeks were not the only people enchanted by Amazons—Mayor shows that warlike women of nomadic cultures inspired exciting tales in ancient Egypt, Persia, India, Central Asia, and China. Driven by a detective's curiosity, Mayor unearths long-buried evidence and sifts fact from fiction to show how flesh-and-blood women of the Eurasian steppes were mythologized as Amazons, the equals of men. The result is likely to become a classic.
Posted in History

Fact Stranger Than Fiction

Seventy-five Years of a Busy Life, with Reminiscences, of Many Great and Good Men and Women

Author: John Patterson Green

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: African Americans

Page: 368

View: 2485

Posted in African Americans

Liberty's Prisoners

Carceral Culture in Early America

Author: Jen Manion

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812247574

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 4808

Liberty's Prisoners examines how changing attitudes about work, freedom, property, and family shaped the creation of the penitentiary system in the United States. The first penitentiary was founded in Philadelphia in 1790, a period of great optimism and turmoil in the Revolution's wake. Those who were previously dependents with no legal standing—women, enslaved people, and indentured servants—increasingly claimed their own right to life, liberty, and happiness. A diverse cast of women and men, including immigrants, African Americans, and the Irish and Anglo-American poor, struggled to make a living. Vagrancy laws were used to crack down on those who visibly challenged longstanding social hierarchies while criminal convictions carried severe sentences for even the most trivial property crimes. The penitentiary was designed to reestablish order, both behind its walls and in society at large, but the promise of reformative incarceration failed from its earliest years. Within this system, women served a vital function, and Liberty's Prisoners is the first book to bring to life the experience of African American, immigrant, and poor white women imprisoned in early America. Always a minority of prisoners, women provided domestic labor within the institution and served as model inmates, more likely to submit to the authority of guards, inspectors, and reformers. White men, the primary targets of reformative incarceration, challenged authorities at every turn while African American men were increasingly segregated and denied access to reform. Liberty's Prisoners chronicles how the penitentiary, though initially designed as an alternative to corporal punishment for the most egregious of offenders, quickly became a repository for those who attempted to lay claim to the new nation's promise of liberty.
Posted in History

Luggage and Leather Goods

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Leather goods

Page: N.A

View: 1143

Posted in Leather goods

The Book of Abraham

Author: Marek Halter

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781592640393

Category: Fiction

Page: 797

View: 5796

The story begins in Jerusalem in 70 AD as Abraham the Temple scribe flees the destruction of his home. Two thousand years and a hundred generations later, another Abraham perishes, immolated in the fires of the Warsaw Ghetto.
Posted in Fiction

The Oxford Handbook of Gender, Sex, and Crime

Author: Rosemary Gartner,Bill McCarthy

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199397295

Category: Social Science

Page: 768

View: 7837

Research on gender, sex, and crime today remains focused on topics that have been a mainstay of the field for several decades, but it has also recently expanded to include studies from a variety of disciplines, a growing number of countries, and on a wider range of crimes. The Oxford Handbook of Gender, Sex, and Crime reflects this growing diversity and provides authoritative overviews of current research and theory on how gender and sex shape crime and criminal justice responses to it. The editors, Rosemary Gartner and Bill McCarthy, have assembled a diverse cast of criminologists, historians, legal scholars, psychologists, and sociologists from a number of countries to discuss key concepts and debates central to the field. The Handbook includes examinations of the historical and contemporary patterns of women's and men's involvement in crime; as well as biological, psychological, and social science perspectives on gender, sex, and criminal activity. Several essays discuss the ways in which sex and gender influence legal and popular reactions to crime. An important theme throughout The Handbook is the intersection of sex and gender with ethnicity, class, age, peer groups, and community as influences on crime and justice. Individual chapters investigate both conventional topics - such as domestic abuse and sexual violence - and topics that have only recently drawn the attention of scholars - such as human trafficking, honor killing, gender violence during war, state rape, and genocide. The Oxford Handbook of Gender, Sex, and Crime offers an unparalleled and comprehensive view of the connections among gender, sex, and crime in the United States and in many other countries. Its insights illuminate both traditional areas of study in the field and pathways for developing cutting-edge research questions.
Posted in Social Science

Health in the City

Race, Poverty, and the Negotiation of Women’s Health in New York City, 1915–1930

Author: Tanya Hart

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 1479873063

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 5907

Shortly after the dawn of the twentieth century, the New York City Department of Health decided to address what it perceived as the racial nature of health. It delivered heavily racialized care in different neighborhoods throughout the city: syphillis treatment among African Americans, tuberculosis for Italian Americans, and so on. It was a challenging and ambitious program, dangerous for the providers, and troublingly reductive for the patients. Nevertheless, poor and working-class African American, British West Indian, and Southern Italian women all received some of the nation’s best health care during this period. Health in the City challenges traditional ideas of early twentieth-century urban black health care by showing a program that was simultaneously racialized and cutting-edge. It reveals that even the most well-meaning public health programs may inadvertently reinforce perceptions of inferiority that they were created to fix.
Posted in History

Straights

Heterosexuality in Post-Closeted Culture

Author: James Joseph Dean

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814789412

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 6686

Since the Stonewall Riots in 1969, the politics of sexual identity in America have drastically transformed. It’s almost old news that recent generations of Americans have grown up in a culture more accepting of out lesbians and gay men, seen the proliferation of LGBTQ media representation, and witnessed the attainment of a range of legal rights for same-sex couples. But the changes wrought by a so-called “post-closeted culture” have not just affected the queer community—heterosexuals are also in the midst of a sea change in how their sexuality plays out in everyday life. In Straights, James Joseph Dean argues that heterosexuals can neither assume the invisibility of gays and lesbians, nor count on the assumption that their own heterosexuality will go unchallenged. The presumption that we are all heterosexual, or that there is such a thing as ‘compulsory heterosexuality,’ he claims, has vanished. Based on 60 in-depth interviews with a diverse group of straight men and women, Straights explores how straight Americans make sense of their sexual and gendered selves in this new landscape, particularly with an understanding of how race does and does not play a role in these conceptions. Dean provides a historical understanding of heterosexuality and how it was first established, then moves on to examine the changing nature of masculinity and femininity and, most importantly, the emergence of a new kind of heterosexuality—notably, for men, the metrosexual, and for women, the emergence of a more fluid sexuality. The book also documents the way heterosexuals interact and form relationships with their LGBTQ family members, friends, acquaintances, and coworkers. Although homophobia persists among straight individuals, Dean shows that being gay-friendly or against homophobic expressions is also increasingly common among straight Americans. A fascinating study, Straights provides an in-depth look at the changing nature of sexual expression in America. Instructors: PowerPoint slides for each chapter are available by clicking on the files below. Introduction Chapter 1 Chapter 2 Chapter 3 Chapter 4 Chapter 5 Chapter 6
Posted in Social Science

Wonder Woman: Warbringer

Author: Leigh Bardugo

Publisher: Random House Books for Young Readers

ISBN: 0399549757

Category: Young Adult Fiction

Page: 384

View: 454

The highly anticipated, entirely new coming-of-age story for the world's greatest super hero: WONDER WOMAN by the # 1 New York Times bestselling author LEIGH BARDUGO. She will become one of the world's greatest heroes: WONDER WOMAN. But first she is Diana, Princess of the Amazons. And her fight is just beginning. . . . Diana longs to prove herself to her legendary warrior sisters. But when the opportunity finally comes, she throws away her chance at glory and breaks Amazon law—risking exile—to save a mere mortal. Even worse, Alia Keralis is no ordinary girl and with this single brave act, Diana may have doomed the world. Alia just wanted to escape her overprotective brother with a semester at sea. She doesn't know she is being hunted. When a bomb detonates aboard her ship, Alia is rescued by a mysterious girl of extraordinary strength and forced to confront a horrible truth: Alia is a Warbringer—a direct descendant of the infamous Helen of Troy, fated to bring about an age of bloodshed and misery. Together, Diana and Alia will face an army of enemies—mortal and divine—determined to either destroy or possess the Warbringer. If they have any hope of saving both their worlds, they will have to stand side by side against the tide of war. Act fast! The first printing includes a poster of Diana! Each first printing in the DC Icons series will have a limited-edition poster—collect them all to create the full image! "Warbringer is straight-up dazzling, every sentence waking up your senses with a 'Yeah, that's right, this is BRAND-NEW, SUCKAS!' punch." —LIBBA BRAY, New York Times bestselling author of The Diviners "Will absolutely satisfy pre-existing fans of Wonder Woman, but it also readily stands alone for non-superhero fans." —Kirkus Reviews, STARRED REVIEW "Wonder Woman is the epitome of a kick-butt heroine, and Bardugo does her justice with aplomb." —The Bulletin "Bardugo breathes zippy new life into the story with a twisty plot, whip-smart characters, and her trademark masterful writing." —Booklist
Posted in Young Adult Fiction

From the War on Poverty to the War on Crime

Author: Elizabeth Hinton

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674737237

Category: History

Page: 449

View: 7630

How did the land of the free become the home of the world’s largest prison system? Elizabeth Hinton traces the rise of mass incarceration to an ironic source: not the War on Drugs of the Reagan administration but the War on Crime that began during Johnson’s Great Society at the height of the civil rights era.
Posted in History

Congressional Serial Set

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: United States

Page: N.A

View: 3952

Posted in United States