Citizenship

The Rise and Fall of a Modern Concept

Author: Andreas Fahrmeir

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780300118483

Category: History

Page: 299

View: 3072

"The book is concerned not just with 'formal' or legal citizenship, but also with the related development of political participation, economic privileges and social rights. Fahrmeir argues that rather than being separate facets of one 'citizenship', these elements were (and continue to be) available to groups that only partly coincide with the community of legal citizens. And he considers whether the combined effects of regionalism, European unification, 'post-democracy' and economic globalization are eroding state citizenship or whether increased immigration controls and stringent criteria for nationality render it as relevant today as ever."--Jacket.
Posted in History

The Cosmopolitan Constitution

Author: Alexander Somek

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191030929

Category: Law

Page: 320

View: 5959

Originally the constitution was expected to express and channel popular sovereignty. It was the work of freedom, springing from and facilitating collective self-determination. After the Second World War this perspective changed: the modern constitution owes its authority not only to collective authorship, it also must commit itself credibly to human rights. Thus people recede into the background, and the national constitution becomes embedded into one or other system of 'peer review' among nations. This is what Alexander Somek argues is the creation of the cosmopolitan constitution. Reconstructing what he considers to be the three stages in the development of constitutionalism, he argues that the cosmopolitan constitution is not a blueprint for the constitution beyond the nation state, let alone a constitution of the international community; rather, it stands for constitutional law reaching out beyond its national bounds. This cosmopolitan constitution has two faces: the first, political, face reflects the changed circumstances of constitutional authority. It conceives itself as constrained by international human rights protection, firmly committed to combating discrimination on the grounds of nationality, and to embracing strategies for managing its interaction with other sites of authority, such as the United Nations. The second, administrative, face of the cosmopolitan constitution reveals the demise of political authority, which has been traditionally vested in representative bodies. Political processes yield to various, and often informal, strategies of policy co-ordination so long as there are no reasons to fear that the elementary civil rights might be severely interfered with. It represents constitutional authority for an administered world.
Posted in Law

Russian Citizenship

From Empire to Soviet Union

Author: Eric Lohr

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674067800

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 4233

In the first book to trace the Russian state’s citizenship policy throughout its history, Lohr argues that to understand the citizenship dilemmas Russia faces today, we must return to the less xenophobic and isolationist pre-Stalin period—before the drive toward autarky after 1914 eventually sealed the state off from Europe.
Posted in History

Shatterzone of Empires

Coexistence and Violence in the German, Habsburg, Russian, and Ottoman Borderlands

Author: Omer Bartov,Eric D. Weitz

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 0253006317

Category: History

Page: 528

View: 8580

From the Baltic to the Black Sea, four major empires with ethnically and religiously diverse populations encountered each other along often changing and contested borders. Examining this geographically vast, multicultural region through a variety of methodological lenses, this volume offers informed and dispassionate analyses of how the many populations of these borderlands managed to coexist in a previous era and why the areas eventually descended into violence. An understanding of this region will help readers grasp the preconditions of interethnic coexistence and the causes of ethnic violence and war in many of the world's other borderlands both past and present.
Posted in History

Becoming Multicultural

Immigration and the Politics of Membership in Canada and Germany

Author: Triadafilos Triadafilopoulos

Publisher: UBC Press

ISBN: 077481568X

Category: Political Science

Page: 256

View: 6170

During the first half of the twentieth century, Canada and Germany’s responses to questions of national membership consisted of discriminatory policies aimed at harnessing migration for economic ends. Yet, by the end of the century, both countries were transformed into highly diverse multicultural societies. How did this remarkable shift come about? Triadafilopoulos argues that, after the war, global human rights norms intersected with domestic political identities and institutions, opening the way for the liberalization of Canada and Germany’s immigration and citizenship policies. His is a thought-provoking analysis that sheds light on the dynamics of membership politics and policy making in contemporary liberal-democratic countries.
Posted in Political Science

The Rise and Decline of the State

Author: Martin van Creveld

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521656290

Category: History

Page: 439

View: 2460

This unique volume traces the history of the state from its beginnings to the present day.
Posted in History

Knowing History in Mexico

An Ethnography of Citizenship

Author: Trevor Stack

Publisher: UNM Press

ISBN: 0826352545

Category: Social Science

Page: 184

View: 2282

While much has been written about national history and citizenship, anthropologist Trevor Stack focuses on the history and citizenship of towns and cities. Basing his inquiry on fieldwork in west Mexican towns near Guadalajara, Stack begins by observing that people talked (and wrote) of their towns’ history and not just of Mexico’s. Key to Stack’s study is the insight that knowing history can give someone public status or authority. It can make someone stand out as a good or eminent citizen. What is it about history that makes this so? What is involved in knowing history and who is good at it? And what do they gain from being eminent citizens, whether of towns or nations? As well as academic historians, Stack interviewed people from all walks of life—bricklayers, priests, teachers, politicians, peasant farmers, lawyers, and migrants. Resisting the idea that history is intrinsically interesting or valuable—that one simply must know the past in order to understand the present—he explores the very idea of “the past” and asks why it is valued by so many people.
Posted in Social Science

Radical Moves

Caribbean Migrants and the Politics of Race in the Jazz Age

Author: Lara Putnam

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 0807838136

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 7294

In the generations after emancipation, hundreds of thousands of African-descended working-class men and women left their homes in the British Caribbean to seek opportunity abroad: in the goldfields of Venezuela and the cane fields of Cuba, the canal construction in Panama, and the bustling city streets of Brooklyn. But in the 1920s and 1930s, racist nativism and a brutal cascade of antiblack immigration laws swept the hemisphere. Facing borders and barriers as never before, Afro-Caribbean migrants rethought allegiances of race, class, and empire. In Radical Moves, Lara Putnam takes readers from tin-roof tropical dancehalls to the elegant black-owned ballrooms of Jazz Age Harlem to trace the roots of the black-internationalist and anticolonial movements that would remake the twentieth century. From Trinidad to 136th Street, these were years of great dreams and righteous demands. Praying or "jazzing," writing letters to the editor or letters home, Caribbean men and women tried on new ideas about the collective. The popular culture of black internationalism they created--from Marcus Garvey's UNIA to "regge" dances, Rastafarianism, and Joe Louis's worldwide fandom--still echoes in the present.
Posted in History

Suspect Families

DNA Analysis, Family Reunification and Immigration Policies

Author: Torsten Heinemann,Ilpo Helén,Thomas Lemke,Ursula Naue,Martin G. Weiss

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 1472424263

Category: Social Science

Page: 144

View: 1221

Suspect Families is the first book to investigate the social, political, and ethical implications of parental testing for family reunification in immigration cases. Drawing on policy documents, legal frameworks, case study material and interviews with representatives of governmental and non-governmental organisation and immigration authorities, immigration lawyers, geneticists and applicants for family reunification, the book analyses the different political regimes and social arrangements in which DNA analysis is adopted for decision-making on family reunification in three distinct European countries: Austria, Finland and Germany. Interdisciplinary in scope, the book reconstructs the processes, institutional logic and the political and administrative practices of DNA testing from a comparative perspective, combining theoretical conceptualisation with detailed empirical work to explore the central societal, political and ethical issues raised by the use of DNA profiling in the context of immigration policy. A ground-breaking study of the role played by new technologies in migration decisions, Suspect Families will appeal to scholars of sociology, political science, science and technology studies and surveillance studies.
Posted in Social Science

The Good Citizen

Author: David Batstone,Eduardo Mendieta

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135302804

Category: Philosophy

Page: 144

View: 1200

In The Good Citizen, some of the most eminent contemporary thinkers take up the question of the future of American democracy in an age of globalization, growing civic apathy, corporate unaccountability, and purported fragmentation of the American common identity by identity politics.
Posted in Philosophy

Atlantic Citizens

Author: Leslie Eckel

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 0748669396

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 248

View: 7873

This book uncovers startling contributions to transatlantic culture and makes the argument that literature is dependent upon other modes of professional creativity in order to thrive.
Posted in Literary Criticism

South Bronx Rising

The Rise, Fall, and Resurrection of an American City

Author: Jill Jonnes

Publisher: Fordham Univ Press

ISBN: 9780823221998

Category: History

Page: 481

View: 5342

This borough, which in its heyday had produced such notable Americans as Clifford Odets, Paddy Cheyefsky, Lauren Bacall, Herman Wouk, Jules Feiffer, Jake LaMotta, Stanley Kubrick, E.L. Doctorow, Neil Simon, and Tony Curtis, now lay in ashes, visible mainly as a dreadful object lesson."--Jacket.
Posted in History

Urbanization without cities

the rise and decline of citizenship

Author: Murray Bookchin

Publisher: Black Rose Books Ltd

ISBN: N.A

Category: Political Science

Page: 316

View: 2707

Posted in Political Science

Nations and Citizens in Yugoslavia and the Post-Yugoslav States

One Hundred Years of Citizenship

Author: Igor ? tiks

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1474221548

Category: Political Science

Page: 208

View: 6807

Between 1914 and the present day the political makeup of the Balkans has relentlessly changed, following unpredictable shifts of international and internal borders. Between and across these borders various political communities were formed, co-existed and (dis)integrated. By analysing one hundred years of modern citizenship in Yugoslavia and post-Yugoslav states, Igor ? tiks shows that the concept and practice of citizenship is necessary to understand how political communities are made, un-made and re-made. He argues that modern citizenship is a tool that can be used for different and opposing goals, from integration and re-unification to fragmentation and ethnic engineering. The study of citizenship in the 'laboratory' of the Balkands offers not only an original angle to narrate an alternative political history, but also an insight into the fine mechanics and repeating glitches of modern politics, applicable to multinational states in the European Union and beyond.
Posted in Political Science

Choice

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Best books

Page: N.A

View: 6204

Posted in Best books

Whitewashing Britain

Race and Citizenship in the Postwar Era

Author: Kathleen Paul

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9780801484407

Category: History

Page: 253

View: 8767

In the late 1940s, the Labour government faced a birthrate perceived to be in decline, massive economic dislocations caused by the war, a huge national debt, severe labor shortages, and the prospective loss of international preeminence. Simultaneously, it subsidized the emigration of Britons to Australia, Canada, and other parts of the Empire, recruited Irish citizens and European refugees to work in Britain, and used regulatory changes to dissuade British subjects of color from coming to the United Kingdom. Paul contends post-war concepts of citizenship were based on a contradiction between the formal definition of who had the right to enter Britain and the informal notion of who was, or could become, really British.
Posted in History

What Can a Citizen Do?

Author: Dave Eggers

Publisher: Chronicle Books

ISBN: 1452176337

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 40

View: 1521

A citizen can pick up litter A citizen can pull a weed A citizen can help that critter A citizen can plant a seed A citizen can aid a neighbor A citizen can join a cause A citizen can write a letter A citizen can help change laws . . . Empowering and timeless, What Can a Citizen Do? is the latest collaboration from the acclaimed duo behind the bestselling Her Right Foot: Dave Eggers and Shawn Harris. This is a book for today's youth about what it means to be a citizen. Across the course of several seemingly unrelated but ultimately connected actions by different children, we watch how kids turn a lonely island into a community—and watch a journey from what the world should be to what the world could be. This is a book about what citizenship—good citizenship—means to you, and to us all.
Posted in Juvenile Nonfiction

The Death and Life of Great American Cities

Author: Jane Jacobs

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 052543285X

Category: Social Science

Page: 480

View: 7713

Thirty years after its publication, The Death and Life of Great American Cities was described by The New York Times as "perhaps the most influential single work in the history of town planning....[It] can also be seen in a much larger context. It is first of all a work of literature; the descriptions of street life as a kind of ballet and the bitingly satiric account of traditional planning theory can still be read for pleasure even by those who long ago absorbed and appropriated the book's arguments." Jane Jacobs, an editor and writer on architecture in New York City in the early sixties, argued that urban diversity and vitality were being destroyed by powerful architects and city planners. Rigorous, sane, and delightfully epigrammatic, Jacobs's small masterpiece is a blueprint for the humanistic management of cities. It is sensible, knowledgeable, readable, indispensable. The author has written a new foreword for this Modern Library edition.
Posted in Social Science

Slave and Citizen

Author: Frank Tannenbaum

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307826554

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

View: 9759

Slave & Citizen deals with one of the most intriguing problems presented by the development of the New World: the contrast between the legal and social positions of the Negro in the United States and in Latin America. It is well-known that in Brazil and in the Caribbean area, Negroes do not suffer legal or even major social disabilities on account of color, and that a long history of acceptance and miscegenation has erased the sharp line between white and colored. Professor Tannenbaum, one of our leading authorities on Latin America, asks why there has been such a sharp distinction between the United States and the other parts of the New World into which Negroes were originally brought as slaves. In the legal structure of the United States, the Negro slave became property. There has been little experience with Negro slaves in England, and the ancient and medieval traditions affecting slavery had died out. As property, the slave was without rights to marriage, to children, to the product of his work, or to freedom. In the Iberian peninsula, on the other hand, Negro slaves were common, and the laws affecting them were well developed. Therefore, in the colonies of Spain and Portugal, while the slave was the lowest person in the social order, he was still a human being, with some rights, and some means by which he might achieve freedom. Only the United States made a radical split with the tradition in which all men, even slaves, had certain inalienable rights.
Posted in Social Science

The American Interest

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: United States

Page: N.A

View: 8777

Posted in United States