Cinema Civil Rights

Regulation, Repression, and Race in the Classical Hollywood Era

Author: Ellen C. Scott

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 0813571375

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 268

View: 9652

From Al Jolson in blackface to Song of the South, there is a long history of racism in Hollywood film. Yet as early as the 1930s, movie studios carefully vetted their releases, removing racially offensive language like the “N-word.” This censorship did not stem from purely humanitarian concerns, but rather from worries about boycotts from civil rights groups and loss of revenue from African American filmgoers. Cinema Civil Rights presents the untold history of how Black audiences, activists, and lobbyists influenced the representation of race in Hollywood in the decades before the 1960s civil rights era. Employing a nuanced analysis of power, Ellen C. Scott reveals how these representations were shaped by a complex set of negotiations between various individuals and organizations. Rather than simply recounting the perspective of film studios, she calls our attention to a variety of other influential institutions, from protest groups to state censorship boards. Scott demonstrates not only how civil rights debates helped shaped the movies, but also how the movies themselves provided a vital public forum for addressing taboo subjects like interracial sexuality, segregation, and lynching. Emotionally gripping, theoretically sophisticated, and meticulously researched, Cinema Civil Rights presents us with an in-depth look at the film industry’s role in both articulating and censoring the national conversation on race.
Posted in Performing Arts

Women Activists and Civil Rights Leaders in Auto/Biographical Literature and Films

Author: Delphine Letort,Benaouda Lebdai

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319770810

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 231

View: 2824

This collective book offers new insight on the genres of biography and autobiography by examining the singular path of those deemed to be ‘outsiders’, such as Winnie Mandela, Ida B. Wells, Malcolm X and Harvey Milk. Its specific focus on these female leaders and civil rights activists, who refused to be constrained by gender, race and class, shifts attention away from the great men of history and places it solely on those who have transformed their personal lives into a fight for collective goals. With an interdisciplinary approach that looks at literature, cinema and cultural studies, Women Activists and Civil Rights Leaders in Auto/Biographical Literature and Cinema argues that life writing is a key source of artistic creativity and activism which enables us to take a fresh look at history.
Posted in Performing Arts

American Cinema of the 1960s

Themes and Variations

Author: Barry Keith Grant

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 0813542197

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 275

View: 4336

The profound cultural and political changes of the 1960s brought the United States closer to social revolution than at any other time in the twentieth century. The country fragmented as various challenges to state power were met with increasing and violent resistance. The Cold War heated up and the Vietnam War divided Americans. Civil rights, women's liberation, and gay rights further emerged as significant social issues. Free love was celebrated even as the decade was marked by assassinations, mass murders, and social unrest. At the same time, American cinema underwent radical change as well. The studio system crumbled, and the Production Code was replaced by a new ratings system. Among the challenges faced by the film industry was the dawning shift in theatrical exhibition from urban centers to surburban multiplexes, an increase in runaway productions, the rise of independent producers, and competition from both television and foreign art films. Hollywood movies became more cynical, violent, and sexually explicit, reflecting the changing values of the time. In ten original essays, American Cinema of the 1960s examines a range of films that characterized the decade, including Hollywood movies, documentaries, and independent and experimental films. Among the films discussed are Elmer Gantry, The Apartment, West Side Story, The Manchurian Candidate, To Kill a Mockingbird, Cape Fear, Bonnie and Clyde, 2001: A Space Odyssey, Midnight Cowboy, and Easy Rider.
Posted in Performing Arts

Race in American Film: Voices and Visions that Shaped a Nation [3 volumes]

Author: Daniel Bernardi,Michael Green

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 0313398402

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 1026

View: 1442

This expansive three-volume set investigates racial representation in film, providing an authoritative cross-section of the most racially significant films, actors, directors, and movements in American cinematic history. • Views the films via a historical approach in which every subject is considered both through a contemporary lens and in terms of the time of its production and initial reception • Provides up-to-date information on recent movies such as Selma (2014), The Fast and The Furious (2001–2015), 12 Years a Slave (2013), Django Unchained (2012), and Lone Survivor (2013) • Provides readers with the information and background necessary to form informed views about racial representation in film—still an important "hot-button" subject today • Edited by top scholars in the field, Daniel Bernardi and Michael Green, and contains entries by other important experts, such as Andrew Gordon and Priscilla Ovalle
Posted in Performing Arts

Fade In, Crossroads

A History of the Southern Cinema

Author: Robert Jackson

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190660198

Category: Art

Page: 384

View: 9579

How did the US South contribute to the development of film? And how did film shape the modern South? In Fade In, Crossroads, Robert Jackson tells the story of the relationships between southerners and motion pictures from the silent era through the golden age of Hollywood. Jackson reveals the profound consequences of the coincidence of the rise and fall of the American film industry with the rise and fall of the South's most important modern product and export: Jim Crow segregation. He considers southern historical legacies on film, from popular Civil War films and comparably popular lynching films emerging in a time of prolific lynching in the South, to the resilient race film industry whose African American filmmakers forged an independent cinematic movement in defiance of the racial restrictions of both the South and Hollywood. He also traces the influence of film on future participants in the Civil Rights Movement, from prominent leaders such as Martin Luther King and Thurgood Marshall to film-industry veterans like Lena Horne and Paul Robeson to the millions of ordinary people, black and white, who found themselves caught up in the struggle for racial equality in the modern United States.
Posted in Art

Sociology on Film

Postwar Hollywood's Prestige Commodity

Author: Chris Cagle

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 0813576962

Category: History

Page: 194

View: 2423

After World War II, Hollywood’s “social problem films”—tackling topical issues that included racism, crime, mental illness, and drug abuse—were hits with critics and general moviegoers alike. In an era of film famed for its reliance on pop psychology, these movies were a form of popular sociology, bringing the academic discipline’s concerns to a much broader audience. Sociology on Film examines how the postwar “problem film” translated contemporary policy debates and intellectual discussions into cinematic form in order to become one of the preeminent genres of prestige drama. Chris Cagle chronicles how these movies were often politically fractious, the work of progressive directors and screenwriters who drew scrutiny from the House Un-American Activities Committee. Yet he also proposes that the genre helped to construct an abstract discourse of “society” that served to unify a middlebrow American audience. As he considers the many forms of print media that served to inspire social problem films, including journalism, realist novels, and sociological texts, Cagle also explores their distinctive cinematic aesthetics. Through a close analysis of films like Gentleman’s Agreement, The Lost Weekend, and Intruder in the Dust, he presents a compelling case that the visual style of these films was intimately connected to their more expressly political and sociological aspirations. Sociology on Film demonstrates how the social problem picture both shaped and reflected the middle-class viewer’s national self-image, making a lasting impact on Hollywood’s aesthetic direction.
Posted in History

The Cambridge Companion to American Civil Rights Literature

Author: Julie Armstrong

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107059836

Category: History

Page: 237

View: 4934

This Companion brings together leading scholars to examine the significant traditions, genres, and themes of civil rights literature.
Posted in History

Projecting Race

Postwar America, Civil Rights, and Documentary Film

Author: Stephen Charbonneau

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231850956

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 208

View: 2846

Projecting Race presents a history of educational documentary filmmaking in the postwar era in light of race relations and the fight for civil rights. Drawing on extensive archival research and textual analyses, the volume tracks the evolution of race-based, nontheatrical cinema from its neorealist roots to its incorporation of new documentary techniques intent on recording reality in real time. The films featured include classic documentaries, such as Sidney Meyers's The Quiet One (1948), and a range of familiar and less familiar state-sponsored educational documentaries from George Stoney (Palmour Street, 1950; All My Babies, 1953; and The Man in the Middle, 1966) and the Drew Associates (Another Way, 1967). Final chapters highlight community-development films jointly produced by the National Film Board of Canada and the Office of Economic Opportunity (The Farmersville Project, 1968; The Hartford Project, 1969) in rural and industrial settings. Featuring testimonies from farm workers, activists, and government officials, the films reflect communities in crisis, where organized and politically active racial minorities upended the status quo. Ultimately, this work traces the postwar contours of a liberal racial outlook as government agencies came to grips with profound and inescapable social change.
Posted in Performing Arts

American Cinema and the Southern Imaginary

Author: Deborah Barker,Kathryn B. McKee

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820337102

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 374

View: 4430

"Placing the New Southern Studies in conversation with film studies, this book is simply the best edited collection available on film and the U.S. South.---Grace Hale. University of Virginia --
Posted in Literary Criticism

New Queer Cinema

The Director’s Cut

Author: B. Ruby Rich

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822399695

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 352

View: 2548

B. Ruby Rich designated a brand new genre, the New Queer Cinema (NQC), in her groundbreaking article in the Village Voice in 1992. This movement in film and video was intensely political and aesthetically innovative, made possible by the debut of the camcorder, and driven initially by outrage over the unchecked spread of AIDS. The genre has grown to include an entire generation of queer artists, filmmakers, and activists. As a critic, curator, journalist, and scholar, Rich has been inextricably linked to the New Queer Cinema from its inception. This volume presents her new thoughts on the topic, as well as bringing together the best of her writing on the NQC. She follows this cinematic movement from its origins in the mid-1980s all the way to the present in essays and articles directed at a range of audiences, from readers of academic journals to popular glossies and weekly newspapers. She presents her insights into such NQC pioneers as Derek Jarman and Isaac Julien and investigates such celebrated films as Go Fish, Brokeback Mountain, Itty Bitty Titty Committee, and Milk. In addition to exploring less-known films and international cinemas (including Latin American and French films and videos), she documents the more recent incarnations of the NQC on screen, on the web, and in art galleries.
Posted in Performing Arts

Black American Cinema

Author: Manthia Diawara

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN: 9780415903974

Category: Fiction

Page: 324

View: 3343

From the pioneering work of Oscar Micheaux and Wallace Thurman to the Hollywood success of Spike Lee, Black American filmmakers have played a remarkable role in the development of the American film, both independent and mainstream. In this volume, the work of early Black filmmakers is given serious attention for the first time. Essays consider what a Black film tradition might be, the relation between Black American filmmakers and filmmakers from the diaspora, the nature of Black film aesthetics, the artist's place within the community, and the representation of a Black imaginary. The collection also discusses Black sexuality on screen, and the role of Black women in independent cinema and as spectators; also, those Black directors who worked for Hollywood and whose films are simplistically dismissed as sell-outs, versus those "crossover" filmmakers whose achievements entail a surreptitious infiltration of the studios.--From publisher description.
Posted in Fiction

Avant-Doc

Intersections of Documentary and Avant-Garde Cinema

Author: Scott MacDonald

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0199388717

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 455

View: 9741

MacDonald explores the cinematic territory between the traditional categories of "documentary" and "avant-garde" film, through candid, in-depth conversations with filmmakers whose work has challenged these categories. Arranged in an imaginative chronology and written to be accessible to any film-interested reader, the interviews in Avant-Doc chart half a century of thinking by inventive filmmakers such as Robert Gardner, Ed Pincus, Alfred Guzzetti, Ross McElwee, Leonard Retel Helmrich, Michael Glawogger, Susana de Sousa Dias, Jonathan Caouette, Pawel Wojtasik, and Todd Haynes. Recent breakthroughs by Amie Siegel, Jane Gillooly, Jennifer Proctor, Betzy Bromberg, and Godfrey Reggio are discussed; and considerable attention is paid to Harvard's innovative Sensory Ethnography Lab, producer of Sweetgrass, Leviathan, and Manakamana. A rare interview with pioneering scholar Annette Michelson begins Avant-Doc's meta-conversation.
Posted in Performing Arts

The Cinema of Steven Spielberg

Empire of Light

Author: Nigel Morris

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231503458

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 224

View: 6407

Cinema's most successful director is a commercial and cultural force demanding serious consideration. Not just triumphant marketing, this international popularity is partly a function of the movies themselves. Polarised critical attitudes largely overlook this, and evidence either unquestioning adulation or vilification often vitriolic for epitomising contemporary Hollywood. Detailed textual analyses reveal that alongside conventional commercial appeal, Spielberg's movies function consistently as a self-reflexive commentary on cinema. Rather than straightforwardly consumed realism or fantasy, they invite divergent readings and self-conscious spectatorship which contradict assumptions about their ideological tendencies. Exercising powerful emotional appeal, their ambiguities are profitably advantageous in maximising audiences and generating media attention.
Posted in Performing Arts

Keyframes: Popular Cinema and Cultural Studies

Author: Matthew Tinkcom,Amy Villarejo

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113463157X

Category: Social Science

Page: 416

View: 9210

Keyframes introduces the study of popular cinema of Hollywood and beyond and responds to the transformative effect of cultural studies on film studies. The contributors rethink contemporary film culture using ideas and concerns from feminism, queer theory, 'race' studies, critiques of nationalism, colonialism and post-colonialism, the cultural economies of fandom, spectator theory, and Marxism. Combining a film studies focus on the film industry, production and technology with a cultural studies analysis of consumption and audiences, Keframes demonstrates the breadth of approaches now available for understanding popular cinema. Subjects addressed include: * Studying Ripley and the 'Alien' films * Pedagogy and Political Correctness in Martial Arts cinema * Judy Garland fandom on the net * Stardom and serial fantasies: Thomas Harris's 'Hannibal' * Tom Hanks and the globalization of stars * Queer Bollywood * Jackie Chan and the Black connection * '12 Monkeys', postmodernism and urban space.
Posted in Social Science

Fifty-Five Positive Steps Black People Can Take to Preserve Themselves into the 21St Century

Author: Michael W. Cromwell

Publisher: iUniverse

ISBN: 0595762565

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 140

View: 3362

The American black is a unique individual, with a unique past and history that needs to be preserved. The American black is not a saint; neither is he a ghost. But he is flesh and blood, a human being that needs to be respected and treated fairly. But the treatment must first come through the manner in which the American black presents himself or herself to the world. Fifty-Five Positive Steps Black People Can Take to Preserve Themselves into the 21st Century provides psychological, physical and spiritual suggestions on how American blacks can empower themselves and therefore empower the race, through one another. Always with an eye on history and a hope for communal unity of some kind, Fifty-Five Steps encourages American black people to do two things: to remember their past, where they come from, always; and to become well rounded people where they are now. And the two concepts are not mutually exclusive. Blacks can be all that they can be, love themselves and their history pridefully and still exist in the climate of modern America. Lastly, Fifty-Five Steps was written in reaction to a growing belief that "blackness" is dead or dying, that black Americans have been absorbed or assimilated. On the contrary, Fifty-Five Steps asks the black readers to love one another and to come together in a final stand for the integrity of essential blackness.
Posted in Body, Mind & Spirit

Hidden Chicano Cinema

Film Dramas in the Borderlands

Author: A. Gabriel Meléndez

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 0813561086

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 288

View: 9364

Hidden Chicano Cinema examines how New Mexico, situated within the boundaries of the United States, became a stand-in for the exotic non-western world that tourists, artists, scientists, and others sought to possess at the dawn of early filmmaking, a disposition stretching from the silent era to today as filmmakers screen their fantasies of what they wished the Southwest Borderlands to be. The book highlights “film moments” in this region’s history including the “filmic turn” ushered in by Chicano/a filmmakers who created new ways to represent their community and region. A. Gabriel Meléndez narrates the drama, intrigue, and politics of these moments and accounts for the specific cinematic practices and the sociocultural detail that explains how the camera itself brought filmmakers and their subjects to unexpected encounters on and off the screen. Such films as Adventures in Kit Carson Land, The Rattlesnake, and Red Sky at Morning, among others, provide examples of movies that have both educated and misinformed us about a place that remains a “distant locale” in the mind of most film audiences.
Posted in Performing Arts

Letterboxed

The Evolution of Widescreen Cinema

Author: Harper Cossar

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 0813126592

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 304

View: 9812

When widescreen technology was introduced to filmmaking in 1953, it changed the visual framework and aesthetic qualities of cinema forever. Before widescreen, a director’s vision for capturing beautiful landscapes or city skylines was limited by what could be included in the boxy confines of an Academy Ratio film frame. The introduction and subsequent evolution of widescreen technology has allowed directors to push the boundaries of filmmaking. Letterboxed: The Evolution of Widescreen Cinema explores the technological changes of the widescreen technique and how the format has inspired directors and also sparked debates among film critics. Examining early filmmakers such as Buster Keaton and D. W. Griffith and genre pioneers like Nicholas Ray and Douglas Sirk, Harper Cossar explains how directors use wider aspect ratios to enhance their creative visions. Letterboxed tracks the history of stylistic experimentation with the film frame and demonstrates how the expansion of the screen has uncovered myriad creative possibilities for directors.
Posted in Technology & Engineering

Responding to Film

A Text Guide for Students of Cinema Art

Author: Constantine Santas

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780830415809

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 298

View: 9395

Responding to Film is a dynamic tool for students who seek as complete an understanding of film as is humanly possible. By focusing on film, the author looks at how it offers students an understanding of themselves, of their culture, and of art. This guide also seeks to familiarize the students with the practical methodology for studying film: how to understand film genres, techniques, and language. The book is supplemented by comprehensive lists of films for study, web sites, and model films. It also includes a model course for instructors. Teachers will find this marvelous guide valuable in a variety of courses, including film literature, film aesthetics, and film as an adaptation of literature. A Burnham Publishers book
Posted in Performing Arts

The Cinema of Isolation

A History of Physical Disability in the Movies

Author: Martin F. Norden

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 9780813521046

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 384

View: 5398

Filmmakers have often encouraged us to regard people with physical disabilities in terms of pity, awe, humor, or fearas "Others" who somehow deserve to be isolated from the rest of society. In this first history of the portrayal of physical disability in the movies, Martin Norden examines hundreds of Hollywood movies (and notable international ones), finds their place within mainstream society, and uncovers the movie industry's practices for maintaining the status quokeeping people with disabilities dependent and "in their place." Norden offers a dazzling array of physically disabled characters who embody or break out of the stereotypes that have both influenced and been symptomatic of societys fluctuating relationship with its physically disabled minority. He shows us "sweet innocents" like Tiny Tim, "obsessive avengers" like Quasimodo, variations on the disabled veteran, and many others. He observes the arrival of a new set of stereotypes tied to the growth of science and technology in the 1970s and 1980s, and underscores movies like My Left Foot and The Waterdance that display a newfound sensitivity. Nordens in-depth knowledge of disability history makes for a particularly intelligent and sensitive approach to this long-overlooked issue in media studies.
Posted in Performing Arts

Blackface, White Noise

Jewish Immigrants in the Hollywood Melting Pot

Author: Michael Rogin

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520921054

Category: Religion

Page: 336

View: 4814

The tangled connections that have bound Jews to African Americans in popular culture and liberal politics are at the heart of Michael Rogin's arresting and unnerving book. Looking at films from Birth of a Nation to Forrest Gump, Rogin explores blackface in Hollywood films as an aperture to broader issues: the nature of "white" identity in America, the role of race in transforming immigrants into "Americans," the common experiences of Jews and African Americans that made Jews key supporters in the fight for racial equality, and the social importance of popular culture. Rogin's forcefully argued study challenges us to confront the harsh truths behind the popularity of racial masquerade.
Posted in Religion