Charleston in Black and White

Race and Power in the South after the Civil Rights Movement

Author: Steve Estes

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469622335

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 3085

Once one of the wealthiest cities in America, Charleston, South Carolina, established a society built on the racial hierarchies of slavery and segregation. By the 1970s, the legal structures behind these racial divisions had broken down and the wealth built upon them faded. Like many southern cities, Charleston had to construct a new public image. In this important book, Steve Estes chronicles the rise and fall of black political empowerment and examines the ways Charleston responded to the civil rights movement, embracing some changes and resisting others. Based on detailed archival research and more than fifty oral history interviews, Charleston in Black and White addresses the complex roles played not only by race but also by politics, labor relations, criminal justice, education, religion, tourism, economics, and the military in shaping a modern southern city. Despite the advances and opportunities that have come to the city since the 1960s, Charleston (like much of the South) has not fully reckoned with its troubled racial past, which still influences the present and will continue to shape the future.
Posted in History

America in Black and White

One Nation, Indivisible

Author: Stephan Thernstrom,Abigail Thernstrom

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781439129098

Category: Social Science

Page: 704

View: 9048

In a book destined to become a classic, Stephan and Abigail Thernstrom present important new information about the positive changes that have been achieved and the measurable improvement in the lives of the majority of African-Americans. Supporting their conclusions with statistics on education, earnings, and housing, they argue that the perception of serious racial divisions in this country is outdated -- and dangerous.
Posted in Social Science

Wedding Band

A Love/hate Story in Black and White

Author: Alice Childress

Publisher: Samuel French, Inc.

ISBN: 9780573617690

Category: African Americans

Page: 73

View: 7700

Blacks and whites during the summer of 1918 in Charleston, South Carolina.
Posted in African Americans

100 Black and White Questions

Author: Christopher D. Burns,Kevin Pendleton

Publisher: C B Pub

ISBN: 9780970195258

Category: Social Science

Page: 248

View: 5082

Exploring the paradox of diversity, this dialogue between two friends--one white and one black--focuses on subject of race as the two men ask each other direct questions and try to respond with honest answers based on personal experience.
Posted in Social Science

Red, White, Black, and Blue

Author: William M. Drennen,Kojo Jones,Dolores Johnson

Publisher: Ohio University Press

ISBN: 0821415352

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 220

View: 9074

William M. Drennan Jr. and Kojo (William T.) Jones Jr. grew up in the South Hills section of Charleston, West Virginia. Both were born in 1942 to families deeply rooted in Appalachia, but with one key difference. Bill Drennen's parents were white and wealthy, and Kojo Jones was born into a hardworking, middle-class black family. They could play on the same Little League baseball team, but the boundaries set by segregation regulated most other aspects of their social and family lives. In 1955 Charleston's all-white Thomas Jefferson Junior High School was desegregated, and ironically it was this attempt to bring the races together that widened the chasms of class, race, and choice that separated Bill's and Kojo's life experiences for the next forty-five years.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

I Am a Man!

Race, Manhood, and the Civil Rights Movement

Author: Steve Estes

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807876336

Category: Political Science

Page: 256

View: 5517

The civil rights movement was first and foremost a struggle for racial equality, but questions of gender lay deeply embedded within this struggle. Steve Estes explores key groups, leaders, and events in the movement to understand how activists used race and manhood to articulate their visions of what American society should be. Estes demonstrates that, at crucial turning points in the movement, both segregationists and civil rights activists harnessed masculinist rhetoric, tapping into implicit assumptions about race, gender, and sexuality. Estes begins with an analysis of the role of black men in World War II and then examines the segregationists, who demonized black male sexuality and galvanized white men behind the ideal of southern honor. He then explores the militant new models of manhood espoused by civil rights activists such as Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr., and groups such as the Nation of Islam, the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, and the Black Panther Party. Reliance on masculinist organizing strategies had both positive and negative consequences, Estes concludes. Tracing these strategies from the integration of the U.S. military in the 1940s through the Million Man March in the 1990s, he shows that masculinism rallied men to action but left unchallenged many of the patriarchal assumptions that underlay American society.
Posted in Political Science

Memphis

In Black and White

Author: Beverly G. Bond,Janann Sherman

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN: 9780738524412

Category: History

Page: 160

View: 6391

With a reputation as wide open as the waters of the Mississippi flowing past its bustling downtown district, Memphis is a city of contrasts and contradictions. From the darkness of epidemics and racial tension to its beacons of music and entreprenurial success, Memphis is a reflection of the true American experience. For many years it was a community functioning almost as two separate societies, yet the ties between the two create one resolute and dynamic city as it begins this new century.
Posted in History

Slaves in the Family

Author: Edward Ball

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN: 146689749X

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 7247

Fifteen years after its hardcover debut, the FSG Classics reissue of the celebrated work of narrative nonfiction that won the National Book Award and changed the American conversation about race, with a new preface by the author The Ball family hails from South Carolina—Charleston and thereabouts. Their plantations were among the oldest and longest-standing plantations in the South. Between 1698 and 1865, close to four thousand black people were born into slavery under the Balls or were bought by them. In Slaves in the Family, Edward Ball recounts his efforts to track down and meet the descendants of his family's slaves. Part historical narrative, part oral history, part personal story of investigation and catharsis, Slaves in the Family is, in the words of Pat Conroy, "a work of breathtaking generosity and courage, a magnificent study of the complexity and strangeness and beauty of the word ‘family.'"
Posted in History

Authentically Black and Truly Catholic

The Rise of Black Catholicism in the Great Migration

Author: Matthew J. Cressler

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 1479841323

Category: Religion

Page: 288

View: 3437

Explores the contentious debates among Black Catholics about the proper relationship between religious practice and racial identity Chicago has been known as the Black Metropolis. But before the Great Migration, Chicago could have been called the Catholic Metropolis, with its skyline defined by parish spires as well as by industrial smoke stacks and skyscrapers. This book uncovers the intersection of the two. Authentically Black and Truly Catholic traces the developments within the church in Chicago to show how Black Catholic activists in the 1960s and 1970s made Black Catholicism as we know it today. The sweep of the Great Migration brought many Black migrants face-to-face with white missionaries for the first time and transformed the religious landscape of the urban North. The hopes migrants had for their new home met with the desires of missionaries to convert entire neighborhoods. Missionaries and migrants forged fraught relationships with one another and tens of thousands of Black men and women became Catholic in the middle decades of the twentieth century as a result. These Black Catholic converts saved failing parishes by embracing relationships and ritual life that distinguished them from the evangelical churches proliferating around them. They praised the “quiet dignity” of the Latin Mass, while distancing themselves from the gospel choirs, altar calls, and shouts of “amen!” increasingly common in Black evangelical churches. Their unique rituals and relationships came under intense scrutiny in the late 1960s, when a growing group of Black Catholic activists sparked a revolution in U.S. Catholicism. Inspired by both Black Power and Vatican II, they fought for the self-determination of Black parishes and the right to identify as both Black and Catholic. Faced with strong opposition from fellow Black Catholics, activists became missionaries of a sort as they sought to convert their coreligionists to a distinctively Black Catholicism. This book brings to light the complexities of these debates in what became one of the most significant Black Catholic communities in the country, changing the way we view the history of American Catholicism.
Posted in Religion

Beyond the Whiteness of Whiteness

Memoir of a White Mother of Black Sons

Author: Jane Lazarre

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822374145

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 184

View: 7920

"I am Black," Jane Lazarre's son tells her. "I have a Jewish mother, but I am not 'biracial.' That term is meaningless to me." In this moving memoir, Jane Lazarre, the white Jewish mother of now adult Black sons, offers a powerful meditation on motherhood and racism in America as she tells the story of how she came to understand the experiences of her African American husband, their growing sons, and their extended family. Recounting her education, as a wife, mother, and scholar-teacher, into the realities of African American life, Lazarre shows how although racism and white privilege lie at the heart of American history and culture, any of us can comprehend the experience of another through empathy and learning. This Twentieth Anniversary Edition features a new preface, in which Lazarre's elegy for Mother Emanuel AME in Charleston, South Carolina, Michael Brown, Eric Garner, and so many others, reminds us of the continued resonance of race in American life. As #BlackLivesMatter gains momentum, Beyond the Whiteness of Whiteness is more urgent and essential than ever.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

Blacks and Whites in Christian America

How Racial Discrimination Shapes Religious Convictions

Author: Jason E. Shelton,Michael O. O. Emerson

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814722784

Category: Social Science

Page: 290

View: 3128

2012 Winner of the C. Calvin Smith Award presented by the Southern Conference on African American Studies, Inc. 2014 Honorable Mention for the Distinguished Book Award presented by the American Sociological Association's Sociology of Religion Section Conventional wisdom holds that Christians, as members of a “universal” religion, all believe more or less the same things when it comes to their faith. Yet black and white Christians differ in significant ways, from their frequency of praying or attending services to whether they regularly read the Bible or believe in Heaven or Hell. In this engaging and accessible sociological study of white and black Christian beliefs, Jason E. Shelton and Michael O. Emerson push beyond establishing that there are racial differences in belief and practice among members of American Protestantism to explore why those differences exist. Drawing on the most comprehensive and systematic empirical analysis of African American religious actions and beliefs to date, they delineate five building blocks of black Protestant faith which have emerged from the particular dynamics of American race relations. Shelton and Emerson find that America’s history of racial oppression has had a deep and fundamental effect on the religious beliefs and practices of blacks and whites across America.
Posted in Social Science

Red Summer

The Summer of 1919 and the Awakening of Black America

Author: Cameron McWhirter

Publisher: Henry Holt and Company

ISBN: 9781429972932

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 9379

A narrative history of America's deadliest episode of race riots and lynchings After World War I, black Americans fervently hoped for a new epoch of peace, prosperity, and equality. Black soldiers believed their participation in the fight to make the world safe for democracy finally earned them rights they had been promised since the close of the Civil War. Instead, an unprecedented wave of anti-black riots and lynchings swept the country for eight months. From April to November of 1919, the racial unrest rolled across the South into the North and the Midwest, even to the nation's capital. Millions of lives were disrupted, and hundreds of lives were lost. Blacks responded by fighting back with an intensity and determination never seen before. Red Summer is the first narrative history written about this epic encounter. Focusing on the worst riots and lynchings—including those in Chicago, Washington, D.C., Charleston, Omaha and Knoxville—Cameron McWhirter chronicles the mayhem, while also exploring the first stirrings of a civil rights movement that would transform American society forty years later.
Posted in History

Black and Blue

Inside the Divide Between the Police and Black America

Author: Jeff Pegues

Publisher: Prometheus Books

ISBN: 1633882578

Category: SOCIAL SCIENCE

Page: 279

View: 6419

CBS News Justice and Homeland Security Correspondent Jeff Pegues "presents an objective overview of the challenges confronting law enforcement as it attempts to reform in the wake of the unrest sparked by the police shootings in Ferguson and other communities"--
Posted in SOCIAL SCIENCE

Black Like Me

Author: John Howard Griffin,Robert Bonazzi

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0451234219

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 200

View: 5010

A white writer recounts his experiences in the American South following treatments that darkened his skin and shares his thoughts on the problems of prejudice and racial injustice.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

The Blue and Gray in Black and White

A History of Civil War Photography

Author: Bob Zeller

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780275982430

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 2034

Profiles the men who documented the Civil War in photography and examines the impact of these photographs on average Americans at the time.
Posted in History

Black in White America

Author: Leonard Freed

Publisher: Getty Publications

ISBN: 1606060112

Category: Photography

Page: 208

View: 7087

Originally published: New York: Grossman Publishers, 1969.
Posted in Photography

Prison Power

How Prison Influenced the Movement for Black Liberation

Author: Lisa M. Corrigan

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 1496809106

Category: Social Science

Page: 208

View: 2927

In the black liberation movement, imprisonment emerged as a key rhetorical, theoretical, and media resource. Imprisoned activists developed tactics and ideology to counter white supremacy. Lisa M. Corrigan underscores how imprisonment—a site for both political and personal transformation—shaped movement leaders by influencing their political analysis and organizational strategies. Prison became the critical space for the transformation from civil rights to Black Power, especially as southern civil rights activists faced setbacks. Black Power activists produced autobiographical writings, essays, and letters about and from prison beginning with the early sit-in movement. Examining the iconic prison autobiographies of H. Rap Brown, Mumia Abu-Jamal, and Assata Shakur, Corrigan conducts rhetorical analyses of these extremely popular though understudied accounts of the Black Power movement. She introduces the notion of the “Black Power vernacular” as a term for the prison memoirists’ rhetorical innovations, to explain how the movement adapted to an increasingly hostile environment in both the Johnson and Nixon administrations. Through prison writings, these activists deployed narrative features supporting certain tenets of Black Power, pride in blackness, disavowal of nonviolence, identification with the Third World, and identity strategies focused on black masculinity. Corrigan fills gaps between Black Power historiography and prison studies by scrutinizing the rhetorical forms and strategies of the Black Power ideology that arose from prison politics. These discourses demonstrate how Black Power activism shifted its tactics to regenerate, even after the FBI sought to disrupt, discredit, and destroy the movement.
Posted in Social Science

Charleston Syllabus

Readings on Race, Racism, and Racial Violence

Author: Chad Williams,Kidada Williams,Keisha Blain

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820349577

Category: Political Science

Page: 368

View: 6931

On June 17, 2015, a white supremacist entered Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina, and sat with some of its parishioners during a Wednesday night Bible study session. An hour later, he began expressing his hatred for African Americans, and soon after, he shot nine church members dead, the church’s pastor and South Carolina state senator, Rev. Clementa C. Pinckney, among them. The ensuing manhunt for the shooter and investigation of his motives revealed his beliefs in white supremacy and reopened debates about racial conflict, southern identity,systemic racism, civil rights, and the African American church as an institution. In the aftermath of the massacre, Professors Chad Williams, Kidada Williams, and Keisha N. Blain sought a way to put the murder—and the subsequent debates about it in the media—in the context of America’s tumultuous history of race relations and racial violence on a global scale. They created the Charleston Syllabus on June 19, starting it as a hashtag on Twitter linking to scholarly works on the myriad of issues related to the murder. The syllabus’s popularity exploded and is already being used as a key resource in discussions of the event. Charleston Syllabus is a reader—a collection of new essays and columns published in the wake of the massacre, along with selected excerpts from key existing scholarly books and general-interest articles. The collection draws from a variety of disciplines—history, sociology, urban studies, law, critical race theory—and includes a selected and annotated bibliography for further reading, drawing from such texts as the Confederate constitution, South Carolina’s secession declaration, songs, poetry, slave narratives, and literacy texts. As timely as it is necessary, the book will be a valuable resource for understanding the roots of American systemic racism, white privilege, the uses and abuses of the Confederate flag and its ideals, the black church as a foundation for civil rights activity and state violence against such activity, and critical whiteness studies.
Posted in Political Science

The Cigar Factory

A Novel of Charleston

Author: Michele Moore

Publisher: Univ of South Carolina Press

ISBN: 1611175917

Category: Fiction

Page: 296

View: 4721

“The sun leaned for down bringing shade to the waterfront,” begins Michele Moore’s entrancing debut novel, harkening back to an era when the legendary fishermen of Charleston’s Mosquito Fleet rowed miles offshore for their daily catch. With evocative dialect and remarkable prose, The Cigar Factory tells the story of two entwined families, both devout Catholics—the white McGonegals and the African American Ravenels—in the storied port city of Charleston, South Carolina, during the World Wars. Moore’s novel follows the parallel lives of family matriarchs working on segregated floors of the massive Charleston cigar factory, where white and black workers remain divided and misinformed about the duties and treatment received by each other. Cassie McGonegal and herniece Brigid work upstairs in the factory rolling cigars by hand. Meliah Amey Ravenel works in the basement, where she stems the tobacco. While both white and black workers suffer in the harsh working conditions of the factory and both endure the sexual harassment of the foremen, segregation keeps them from recognizing their common plight until the Tobacco Workers Strike of 1945. Through the experience of a brutal picket line, the two women come to realize how much they stand to gain by joining forces, creating a powerful moment in labor history that gives rise to the Civil Rights anthem, “We Shall Overcome.” Moore’s extensive historical research included interviews with her own family members who worked at the cigar factory, adding a layer of nuance and authenticity to her empowering story of families and friendships forged through struggle, loss, and redemption. The Cigar Factory includes a foreword by New York Times best-selling author and Story River Books editor at large Pat Conroy.
Posted in Fiction

Black Man in a White Coat

A Doctor's Reflections on Race and Medicine

Author: Damon Tweedy

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 1250044634

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 304

View: 2392

"When Damon Tweedy first enters the halls of Duke University Medical School on a full scholarship, he envisions a bright future where his segregated, working class background will become largely irrelevant. Instead, he finds that he has joined a new world where race is front and center. When one of his first professors mistakes him for a maintenance worker, it is a moment that crystallizes the challenges he will face throughout his early career. Making matters worse, in lecture after lecture the common refrain for numerous diseases resounds: "more common in blacks than whites." [This book] examines the complex ways in which both black doctors and patients must navigate the difficult and often contradictory terrain of race and medicine"--
Posted in Biography & Autobiography