Chaco Canyon

Archaeologists Explore the Lives of an Ancient Society

Author: Brian M. Fagan

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: N.A

Category: Architecture

Page: 256

View: 6333

In this account of the people of Chaco Canyon, a leading expert on prehistoric culture weaves the latest discoveries on Chaco into a narrative of the foraging bands, humble farmers, and elaborate society that flourished between the tenth and twelfth centuries A.D.
Posted in Architecture

Versunkene Welten und wie man sie findet

Auf den Spuren genialer Entdecker und Archäologen

Author: Eric H. Cline

Publisher: DVA

ISBN: 3641221358

Category: History

Page: 528

View: 9138

Untergegangene Städte, sagenumwobene Schätze, rätselhafte Schriftzeichen Eric Cline, preisgekrönter Wissenschaftler und Autor, entführt uns in die spannende Welt der Archäologie und zeigt, wie sich die Beschäftigung mit den Völkern und Kulturen der Vergangenheit von der Amateurforschung zu einer hoch professionalisierten und technisierten Wissenschaft entwickelt hat. Dabei begegnen wir Entdeckern wie Howard Carter, Heinrich Schliemann und John Lloyd Stephens und begleiten sie dabei, wie sie die Grabkammern des Tutanchamun, die Überreste des antiken Troja und Stätten der Maya-Kultur ans Tageslicht befördern. Lebendig und packend erzählt Cline die faszinierende Geschichte der Archäologie und bringt uns zugleich die Arbeit der Archäologen näher.
Posted in History

Climate and Culture Change in North America AD 900–1600

Author: William C. Foster

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292742703

Category: Social Science

Page: 234

View: 6005

Climate change is today’s news, but it isn’t a new phenomenon. Centuries-long cycles of heating and cooling are well documented for Europe and the North Atlantic. These variations in climate, including the Medieval Warm Period (MWP), AD 900 to 1300, and the early centuries of the Little Ice Age (LIA), AD 1300 to 1600, had a substantial impact on the cultural history of Europe. In this pathfinding volume, William C. Foster marshals extensive evidence that the heating and cooling of the MWP and LIA also occurred in North America and significantly affected the cultural history of Native peoples of the American Southwest, Southern Plains, and Southeast. Correlating climate change data with studies of archaeological sites across the Southwest, Southern Plains, and Southeast, Foster presents the first comprehensive overview of how Native American societies responded to climate variations over seven centuries. He describes how, as in Europe, the MWP ushered in a cultural renaissance, during which population levels surged and Native peoples substantially intensified agriculture, constructed monumental architecture, and produced sophisticated works of art. Foster follows the rise of three dominant cultural centers—Chaco Canyon in New Mexico, Cahokia on the middle Mississippi River, and Casas Grandes in northwestern Chihuahua, Mexico—that reached population levels comparable to those of London and Paris. Then he shows how the LIA reversed the gains of the MWP as population levels and agricultural production sharply declined; Chaco Canyon, Cahokia, and Casas Grandes collapsed; and dozens of smaller villages also collapsed or became fortresses.
Posted in Social Science

The World of Indigenous North America

Author: Robert Warrior

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136331999

Category: Social Science

Page: 676

View: 9008

The World of Indigenous North America is a comprehensive look at issues that concern indigenous people in North America. Though no single volume can cover every tribe and every issue around this fertile area of inquiry, this book takes on the fields of law, archaeology, literature, socio-linguistics, geography, sciences, and gender studies, among others, in order to make sense of the Indigenous experience. Covering both Canada's First Nations and the Native American tribes of the United States, and alluding to the work being done in indigenous studies through the rest of the world, the volume reflects the critical mass of scholarship that has developed in Indigenous Studies over the past decade, and highlights the best new work that is emerging in the field. The World of Indigenous North America is a book for every scholar in the field to own and refer to often. Contributors: Chris Andersen, Joanne Barker, Duane Champagne, Matt Cohen, Charlotte Cote, Maria Cotera, Vincente M. Diaz, Elena Maria Garcia, Hanay Geiogamah, Carole Goldberg, Brendan Hokowhitu, Sharon Holland, LeAnne Howe, Shari Huhndorf, Jennie Joe, Ted Jojola, Daniel Justice, K. Tsianina Lomawaima, Jose Antonio Lucero, Tiya Miles, Felipe Molina, Victor Montejo, Aileen Moreton-Robinson, Val Napoleon, Melissa Nelson, Jean M. O'Brien, Amy E. Den Ouden, Gus Palmer, Michelle Raheja, David Shorter, Noenoe K. Silva, Shannon Speed, Christopher B. Teuton, Sean Teuton, Joe Watkins, James Wilson, Brian Wright-McLeod
Posted in Social Science

Before the Revolution

Author: Daniel K. Richter

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674061241

Category: History

Page: 560

View: 2302

In this epic synthesis, Richter reveals a new America. Surveying many centuries prior to the American Revolution, we discover the tumultuous encounters between the peoples of North America, Africa, and Europe and see how the present is the accumulation of the ancient layers of the past.
Posted in History

The Sociology of Religion

A Substantive and Transdisciplinary Approach

Author: George Lundskow

Publisher: Pine Forge Press

ISBN: 1412937213

Category: Social Science

Page: 445

View: 1731

Using a lively narrative, The Sociology of Religion is an insightful text that follows the logic of actual research, first investigating the facts of religion in all its great diversity, including its practices and beliefs, and then analyzing actual examples of religious developments using relevant conceptual frameworks. As a result, students actively engage in the discovery, learning, and analytical processes as they progress through the textùjust as a scholar pursues knowledge in the field and then applies theoretical constructs to interpret findings.This unique text is organized around essential topics and real-life issues and examines religion both as an object of sociological analysis as well as a device for seeking personal meaning in life. While primarily sociological in focus, the text incorporates relevant interdisciplinary scholarshipùthus teaching sociological perspectives on religion while introducing students to relevant research from other fields. Sidebar features and photographs of religious figures bring the text to life for readers.Key Features and Benefits:Uses substantive and truly contemporary real-life religious issues of current interest to engage the reader in a way few other texts doCombines theory with empirical examples drawn from the United States and around the world, emphasizing a critical and analytical perspective that encourages better understanding of the material presentedFeatures discussions of emergent religions, consumerism, and the link between religion, sports, and other forms of popular cultureDraws upon interdisciplinary literature, helping students appreciate the contributions of other disciplines while primarily developing an understanding of the sociology of religion InstructorÆs Resources on CD-ROM· InstructorÆs Resources on CD-ROM contains chapter outlines, summaries, multiple-choice questions, essay questions, and short answer questions as well as illustrations from the book. Contact Customer Care at 1-800-818-SAGE (7243) to request a copy (6:00 a.m.û5:00 p.m., PST).Intended Audience: This core text is designed for upper-level undergraduate students of Sociology of Religion or Religion and Politics.
Posted in Social Science

Why You Can't Teach United States History without American Indians

Author: Susan Sleeper-Smith,Juliana Barr,Jean M. O'Brien,Nancy Shoemaker

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469621215

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 3446

A resource for all who teach and study history, this book illuminates the unmistakable centrality of American Indian history to the full sweep of American history. The nineteen essays gathered in this collaboratively produced volume, written by leading scholars in the field of Native American history, reflect the newest directions of the field and are organized to follow the chronological arc of the standard American history survey. Contributors reassess major events, themes, groups of historical actors, and approaches--social, cultural, military, and political--consistently demonstrating how Native American people, and questions of Native American sovereignty, have animated all the ways we consider the nation's past. The uniqueness of Indigenous history, as interwoven more fully in the American story, will challenge students to think in new ways about larger themes in U.S. history, such as settlement and colonization, economic and political power, citizenship and movements for equality, and the fundamental question of what it means to be an American. Contributors are Chris Andersen, Juliana Barr, David R. M. Beck, Jacob Betz, Paul T. Conrad, Mikal Brotnov Eckstrom, Margaret D. Jacobs, Adam Jortner, Rosalyn R. LaPier, John J. Laukaitis, K. Tsianina Lomawaima, Robert J. Miller, Mindy J. Morgan, Andrew Needham, Jean M. O'Brien, Jeffrey Ostler, Sarah M. S. Pearsall, James D. Rice, Phillip H. Round, Susan Sleeper-Smith, and Scott Manning Stevens.
Posted in History

Beyond the Blue Horizon

How the Earliest Mariners Unlocked the Secrets of the Oceans

Author: Brian Fagan

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 1608193853

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 5006

In Beyond the Blue Horizon, bestselling science historian Brian Fagan tackles his richest topic yet: the enduring mystery of the oceans, the planet's most forbidding terrain.This is not a tale of Columbus or Hudson, but of much earlier mariners. From the moment when ancient Polynesians first dared to sail beyond the horizon, Fagan vividly explains how our mastery of the oceans has changed history, even before history was written. Beyond the Blue Horizon delves into the very beginnings of humanity's long and intimate relationship with the sea. It willl enthrall readers who enjoyed Longitude, Simon Winchester's Atlantic, or in its scope and its insightful linking of technology and culture, Guns, Germs, and Steel. What drove humans to risk their lives on open water? How did early sailors unlock the secrets of winds, tides, and the stars they steered by? What were the earliest ocean crossings like? With compelling detail, Brian Fagan reveals how seafaring evolved so that the vast realms of the sea gods were transformed from barriers into highways that hummed with commerce. Indeed, for most of human history, oceans have been the most vital connectors of far-flung societies. From bamboo rafts in the Java Sea to the caravels of the Age of Discovery, from Easter Island to Crete, Brian Fagan crafts a captivating narrative of humanity's urge to seek out distant shores, of the daring men and women who did so, and of the mark they have left on civilization.
Posted in History

The Indian Great Awakening

Religion and the Shaping of Native Cultures in Early America

Author: Linford D. Fisher

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019991284X

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 4811

The First Great Awakening was a time of heightened religious activity in the colonial New England. Among those whom the English settlers tried to convert to Christianity were the region's native peoples. In this book, Linford Fisher tells the gripping story of American Indians' attempts to wrestle with the ongoing realities of colonialism between the 1670s and 1820. In particular, he looks at how some members of previously unevangelized Indian communities in Connecticut, Rhode Island, western Massachusetts, and Long Island adopted Christian practices, often joining local Congregational churches and receiving baptism. Far from passively sliding into the cultural and physical landscape after King Philip's War, he argues, Native individuals and communities actively tapped into transatlantic structures of power to protect their land rights, welcomed educational opportunities for their children, and joined local white churches. Religion repeatedly stood at the center of these points of cultural engagement, often in hotly contested ways. Although these Native groups had successfully resisted evangelization in the seventeenth century, by the eighteenth century they showed an increasing interest in education and religion. Their sporadic participation in the First Great Awakening marked a continuation of prior forms of cultural engagement. More surprisingly, however, in the decades after the Awakening, Native individuals and sub-groups asserted their religious and cultural autonomy to even greater degrees by leaving English churches and forming their own Indian Separate churches. In the realm of education, too, Natives increasingly took control, preferring local reservation schools and demanding Indian teachers whenever possible. In the 1780s, two small groups of Christian Indians moved to New York and founded new Christian Indian settlements. But the majority of New England Natives-even those who affiliated with Christianity-chose to remain in New England, continuing to assert their own autonomous existence through leasing land, farming, and working on and off the reservations. While Indian involvement in the Great Awakening has often been seen as total and complete conversion, Fisher's analysis of church records, court documents, and correspondence reveals a more complex reality. Placing the Awakening in context of land loss and the ongoing struggle for cultural autonomy in the eighteenth century casts it as another step in the ongoing, tentative engagement of native peoples with Christian ideas and institutions in the colonial world. Charting this untold story of the Great Awakening and the resultant rise of an Indian Separatism and its effects on Indian cultures as a whole, this gracefully written book challenges long-held notions about religion and Native-Anglo-American interaction
Posted in History

The archaeology of Chaco Canyon

an eleventh-century Pueblo regional center

Author: Stephen H. Lekson

Publisher: School for Advanced Research on the

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 540

View: 6193

The site of a great Ancestral Pueblo center in the 11th and 12th centuries AD, the ruins in Chaco Canyon look like a city to some archaeologists, a ceremonial center to others. Chaco and the people who created its monumental great houses, extensive roads, and network of outlying settlements remain an enigma in American archaeology, although all agree they were exceptional in Southwestern prehistory. In this capstone volume, the contributors address central archaeological themes, including environment, organization of production, architecture, regional issues, and society and polity.They place Chaco in its time and in its region, considering what came before and after its heyday and its neighbors to the north and south, including Mesoamerica.
Posted in History

Cosmology across cultures

proceedings of a workshop held at Parque de las Ciencias, Granada, Spain, 8-12 September 2008

Author: José Alberto Rubiño-Martín

Publisher: Astronomical Society of the pacific

ISBN: 9781583816981

Category: Science

Page: 500

View: 2943

Posted in Science

Library Journal

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Libraries

Page: N.A

View: 1221

Posted in Libraries

The Collapse of Complex Societies

Author: Joseph Tainter

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521386739

Category: Social Science

Page: 250

View: 8232

Dr Tainter describes nearly two dozen cases of collapse and reviews more than 2000 years of explanations. He then develops a new and far-reaching theory.
Posted in Social Science

Kollaps

Warum Gesellschaften überleben oder untergehen

Author: Jared Diamond

Publisher: S. Fischer Verlag

ISBN: 3104034001

Category: History

Page: 736

View: 2829

Der Weltbestseller als erweiterte Neuausgabe! Die überwucherten Tempelruinen von Angkor Wat, die zerfallenden Pyramiden der Maya in Yucatan und die rätselhaften Moai-Statuen der Osterinsel – sie alle sind stille Zeugen von einstmals blühenden Kulturen, die irgendwann verschwanden. Doch was waren die Ursachen dafür? Jared Diamond zeichnet in seiner erweiterten, faszinierenden wie hochaktuellen Studie die Muster nach, die dem Untergang von Gesellschaften (oder ihrem Überleben) zugrunde liegen, und zeigt, was wir für unsere Zukunft daraus lernen können.
Posted in History

Ten Thousand Years of Inequality

The Archaeology of Wealth Differences

Author: Timothy A. Kohler,Michael E. Smith

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 0816539448

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

View: 3754

Is wealth inequality a universal feature of human societies, or did early peoples live an egalitarian existence? How did inequality develop before the modern era? Did inequalities in wealth increase as people settled into a way of life dominated by farming and herding? Why in general do such disparities increase, and how recent are the high levels of wealth inequality now experienced in many developed nations? How can archaeologists tell? Ten Thousand Years of Inequality addresses these and other questions by presenting the first set of consistent quantitative measurements of ancient wealth inequality. The authors are archaeologists who have adapted the Gini index, a statistical measure of wealth distribution often used by economists to measure contemporary inequality, and applied it to house-size distributions over time and around the world. Clear descriptions of methods and assumptions serve as a model for other archaeologists and historians who want to document past patterns of wealth disparity. The chapters cover a variety of ancient cases, including early hunter-gatherers, farmer villages, and agrarian states and empires. The final chapter synthesizes and compares the results. Among the new and notable outcomes, the authors report a systematic difference between higher levels of inequality in ancient Old World societies and lower levels in their New World counterparts. For the first time, archaeology allows humanity’s deep past to provide an account of the early manifestations of wealth inequality around the world. Contributors Nicholas Ames Alleen Betzenhauser Amy Bogaard Samuel Bowles Meredith S. Chesson Abhijit Dandekar Timothy J. Dennehy Robert D. Drennan Laura J. Ellyson Deniz Enverova Ronald K. Faulseit Gary M. Feinman Mattia Fochesato Thomas A. Foor Vishwas D. Gogte Timothy A. Kohler Ian Kuijt Chapurukha M. Kusimba Mary-Margaret Murphy Linda M. Nicholas Rahul C. Oka Matthew Pailes Christian E. Peterson Anna Marie Prentiss Michael E. Smith Elizabeth C. Stone Amy Styring Jade Whitlam
Posted in Social Science

Deep Sea

Eine Reise zum Grund des Ozeans

Author: James Nestor

Publisher: Piper ebooks

ISBN: 3492967353

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 320

View: 1515

Ein Besuch der Apnoe-Weltmeisterschaft wird für James Nestor zum Beginn eines persönlichen Abenteuers: Fasziniert von der Kompromisslosigkeit dieses Sports, erlernt er selbst das Freitauchen. Und fortan zieht es ihn immer tiefer in die verborgene Welt der Ozeane hinab: Er besucht eine Forschungsstation 20 Meter unter der Meeresoberfläche, trifft renommierten Meeresbiologen bei ihrer Arbeit, schwimmt mit Walen und geht im U-Boot auf Tauchstation. Dabei entdeckt er einen unfassbar reichen Lebensraum, mit telepathischen Korallen, leuchtenden Fischen und rätselhaften Riesenkraken. Bis er schließlich den tiefsten Punkt der Erde erreicht – die absolute Grenze für Mensch und Technik. Eine grandiose Entdeckungsreise, die zugleich unseren Wurzeln nachspürt.
Posted in Sports & Recreation

In Search of the Old Ones

Author: David Roberts

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781439127230

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 9019

An exuberant, hands-on fly-on-the-wall account that combines the thrill of canyoneering and rock climbing with the intellectual sleuthing of archaeology to explore the Anasazi. David Roberts describes the culture of the Anasazi—the name means “enemy ancestors” in Navajo—who once inhabited the Colorado Plateau and whose modern descendants are the Hopi Indians of Arizona. Archaeologists, Roberts writes, have been puzzling over the Anasazi for more than a century, trying to determine the environmental and cultural stresses that caused their society to collapse 700 years ago. He guides us through controversies in the historical record, among them the haunting question of whether the Anasazi committed acts of cannibalism. Roberts’s book is full of up-to-date thinking on the culture of the ancient people who lived in the harsh desert country of the Southwest.
Posted in History

Kokopelli

The Magic, Mirth, and Mischief of an Ancient Symbol

Author: Dennis Slifer

Publisher: Gibbs Smith

ISBN: 9781423601746

Category: Art

Page: 199

View: 2180

A guide to the ancient symbols and sites of the Southewest's most iconic image
Posted in Art