Booth's Maps of London Poverty 1889

East and West

Author: Charles Booth

Publisher: Old House Books

ISBN: 9781908402806

Category: History

Page: 2

View: 6153

A century after the Industrial Revolution began, some Victorians finally began to confront the problems industrialisation and urbanisation had wrought. The remarkable proliferation of new factories, railways and docks owned by massively wealthy entrepreneurs created new depths of poverty and deprivation, which outraged philanthropist and researcher Charles Booth. These two maps, commissioned by Booth and the first of their kind, classify London streets into seven categories, from the very poor lowest class mainly in the east end (but with some surprising enclaves in the fashionable west) right up to the wealthy upper classes in Marylebone and Mayfair. A fascinating resource for genealogists, historians and all lovers of London's past.
Posted in History

Routledge Revivals: Charles Booth's London (1969)

A Portrait of the Poor at the Turn of the Century, Drawn from His "Life and Labour of the People in London"

Author: Albert Fried,Richard M. Elman

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351981579

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 1203

First published in 1969, this book presents a one-volume anthology of Charles Booth’s Life and Labour of the People in London, the classic early study of the poor in the urban environment. The original text consists of a vast compendium of descriptions of families, homes, streets, conditions of work, cultural and religious practices, much of it illustrated with charts, maps and statistics — giving the public an idea of the dimensions and meaning of poverty. The editors have selected the extracts in this book for their vividness, readability and intrinsic interest, and their introduction conveys the context of 1880s London — relating Booth’s investigations to contemporary concerns.
Posted in History

The Blackest Streets

The Life and Death of a Victorian Slum

Author: Sarah Wise

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1448162238

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 5945

In 1887 Government inspectors were sent to investigate the Old Nichol, a notorious slum on the boundary of Bethnal Green parish, where almost 6,000 inhabitants were crammed into thirty or so streets of rotting dwellings and where the mortality rate ran at nearly twice that of the rest of Bethnal Green. Among much else they discovered that the decaying 100-year-old houses were some of the most lucrative properties in the capital for their absent slumlords, who included peers of the realm, local politicians and churchmen. The Blackest Streets is set in a turbulent period of London's history when revolution was in the air. Award-winning historian Sarah Wise skilfully evokes the texture of life at that time, not just for the tenants but for those campaigning for change and others seeking to protect their financial interests. She recovers Old Nichol from the ruins of history and lays bare the social and political conditions that created and sustained this black hole which lay at the very heart of the Empire.
Posted in History

London

a life in maps

Author: Dr. Peter Whitfield

Publisher: British Library Board

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 328

A city long shrouded in literary and historical mists--not to mention real ones--London seduces tourists and natives alike. From Big Ben to the grimy Victorian streets of Dickens novels on up to the sleek high-rises that dot the skyline of the twenty-first-century metropolis, the urban landscape of London is steeped in history, while forever responsive to the changing dictates of progress, industry, and culture. InLondon: A Life in Maps, acclaimed historian Peter Whitfield reveals a wealth of surprising truths and forgotten facts hidden in the city's historic maps. Whitfield examines nearly 200 maps spanning the last 500 years, all of which vividly demonstrate the vast changes wrought on London's streets, open spaces, and buildings. In a rich array of colorful cartographic illustrations, the maps chronicle London's tumultuous history, from the devastation of the Great Fire to the indelible marks left by World Wars I and II to the emergence of the West End as a fashion mecca. Whitfield reads historic sketches and detailed plans as biographical keys to this complex, sprawling urban center, and his in-depth examination unearths fascinating insights into the city of black cabs and red double-deckers. With engaging prose and astute analysis he also expertly coaxes out the subtle complexitiesof social history, urban planning, and designwithin the rich documentation of London's immense and constantly changing cityscape. London: A Life in Mapslets readers wander through the past and present of London's celebrated streetsfrom Abbey Road to Savile Rowand along the way reveals the city's captivating history, vibrant culture, and potential future.
Posted in History

In Darkest England and the Way Out

Author: William Booth

Publisher: W. Bryce

ISBN: N.A

Category: Agricultural colonies

Page: 285

View: 5779

An analysis of the causes of poverty in England, with some proposed solutions, from the founder of the Salvation Army. The title is a deliberate reference to Stanley's "In darkest Africa," which was published the same year.
Posted in Agricultural colonies

Bradshaw's Handbook to London

Author: George Bradshaw

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 184486183X

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 5989

Conway's latest contribution to the Bradshaw's publishing phenomenon is this superb and wonderfully illustrated guide to Victorian London, dating from 1862. The book was published in a single volume as a handbook for visitors to the capital, and it includes beautiful engravings of London attractions, a historical overview of the city, and lots of other information relating to London theatres, Hackney carriages, omnibuses, London churches and even banks. There is also advice for tourists on coping with London smog, avoiding pickpockets, dealing with London's muddy streets and ferocious din, and many other topics - some just as useful today as they were in 1862! The main body of the book focuses on a series of 'walking tours' radiating outwards from the centre of London, covering the North, East, South and West, The City of London and a tour of the Thames (from Greenwich to Windsor). All major attractions and districts are covered in detailed pages full of picturesque description. This reformatted edition preserves the historical value of this meticulously detailed and comprehensive book, which will appeal to Bradshaw's enthusiasts, local historians, aficionados of Victoriana, tourists and Londoners alike - there really is something for everyone. It will enchant anyone with an interest in the capital and its rich history.
Posted in History

The London County Council Bomb Damage Maps, 1939-1945

Author: London Metropolitan Archives,Laurence Ward

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780500518250

Category:

Page: 288

View: 5265

The attack on London between 1939 and 1945 is one of the most significant events in the city's modern history, the impact of which can still be seen in its urban and social landscapes. As a key record of the attack, the London County Council Bomb Damage Maps represent destruction on a huge scale, recording buildings and streets reduced to smoke and rubble. The full set of maps is made up of 110 hand-coloured 1:2500 Ordnance Survey base sheets originally published in 1916 but updated by the LCC to 1940. Because they use the 1916 map, they give us a glimpse of a 'lost London', before post-war redevelopment schemes began to shape the modern city. The colouring applied to the maps records a scale of damage to London's built environment during the war - the most detailed and complete survey of destruction caused by the aerial bombardment. A clear and fascinating introduction by expert Laurence Ward sets the maps in the full historical context of the events that gave rise to them, supported by archival photographs and tables of often grim statistics.
Posted in

Beyond the Tower

A History of East London

Author: John Marriott

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300148801

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 1737

From Jewish clothing merchants to Bangladeshi curry houses, ancient docks to the 2012 Olympics, the area east of the City has always played a crucial role in London's history. The East End, as it has been known, was the home to Shakespeare's first theater and to the early stirrings of a mass labor movement; it has also traditionally been seen as a place of darkness and despair, where Jack the Ripper committed his gruesome murders, and cholera and poverty stalked the Victorian streets. In this beautifully illustrated history of this iconic district, John Marriott draws on twenty-five years of research into the subject to present an authoritative and endlessly fascinating account. With the aid of copious maps, archive prints and photographs, and the words of East Londoners from seventeenth-century silk weavers to Cockneys during the Blitz, he explores the relationship between the East End and the rest of London, and challenges many of the myths that surround the area.
Posted in History

The Secret History of Our Streets

A Story of London

Author: Joseph Bullman,Neil Hegarty,Brian Hill

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1849904510

Category: London (England)

Page: 368

View: 7981

The Secret History of Our Streets explores six roads spread across inner London - from Camberwell, Holland Park and Islington to Shoreditch, Deptford and Bermondsey - through the experiences of the people who lived there. Stories of poverty and violence, faith, love and hope, this is an intimate examination of our capital and the changing lives of its inhabitants. The history of over a hundred years of social change, this is the untold history of the sreets beneath our feet. You'll never look at your own street the same way again.
Posted in London (England)

Old East Enders

A History of the Tower Hamlets

Author: Jane Cox

Publisher: The History Press

ISBN: 0750956291

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 979

The publication of this book is a landmark in London history. Not since 1951 has there been a serious attempt to chronicle the history of East London. Old East Enders tells East London’s story from Roman Shadwell to the present day, focusing on the untold story of the medieval and early modern Tower Hamlets. Jane Cox is an experienced author and lecturer, and her immensely readable and entertaining new book takes in recent archaeological research and a whole range of new record research. A wide range of fascinating and in some cases previously unpublished illustrations further enliven the text, which illuminates the history of this part of London as never before.
Posted in History

A CHILD OF THE JAGO (Modern Classics Series)

A Tale from the Old London Slum

Author: Arthur Morrison

Publisher: e-artnow

ISBN: 8026853601

Category: Fiction

Page: 256

View: 8190

This carefully crafted ebook: äóìA CHILD OF THE JAGO (Modern Classics Series)äó� is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. A Child of the Jago recounts the brief life of Dicky Perrott, a child growing up in the "Old Jago", a fictionalization of the Old Nichol, a slum located between Shoreditch High Street and Bethnal Green Road in the East End of London. The Jago is a London slum where crime and violence are the only way of life, and from which there is no escape for the inhabitants. At the start of the novel Dicky Perrott is about 8 years old, undernourished and roaming the streets, forced to do whatever it takes in order to survive. Dickyäó»s affectionate nature and willingness to work provides a glimmer of hope that he can escape from the corruption of the Jago, but this hope is cynically thwarted by the avaricious Weech. The criminalizing of innocence in an environment of poverty and crime echoes the predicament of Oliver Twist. Arthur Morrison (1863-1945) was an English writer and journalist known for his realistic novels and stories about working-class life in London's East End, A Child of the Jago being the best known. Morrison is also known for his detective stories, featuring the detective Martin Hewitt, low-key, realistic, lower class answer to Sherlock Holmes. Martin Hewitt stories are similar in style to those of Conan Doyle, cleverly plotted and very amusing, while the character himself is a bit less arrogant and a bit more charming than Holmes.
Posted in Fiction

Unequal health

The Scandal of Our Times

Author: Daniel Dorling,Dorling, Danny

Publisher: Policy Press

ISBN: 1447305132

Category: Medical

Page: 470

View: 8837

In his new book, academic and writer Danny Dorling describes the current extent of inequalities in health as the scandal of our times.
Posted in Medical

Mapping Society

The Spatial Dimensions of Social Cartography

Author: Laura Vaughan

Publisher: UCL Press

ISBN: 1787353079

Category: Social Science

Page: 268

View: 4342

From a rare map of yellow fever in eighteenth-century New York, to Charles Booth’s famous maps of poverty in nineteenth-century London, an Italian racial zoning map of early twentieth-century Asmara, to a map of wealth disparities in the banlieues of twenty-first-century Paris, Mapping Society traces the evolution of social cartography over the past two centuries. In this richly illustrated book, Laura Vaughan examines maps of ethnic or religious difference, poverty, and health inequalities, demonstrating how they not only serve as historical records of social enquiry, but also constitute inscriptions of social patterns that have been etched deeply on the surface of cities.
Posted in Social Science

The Social Survey in Historical Perspective, 1880-1940

Author: Martin Bulmer,Kevin Bales,Kathryn Kish Sklar

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521363349

Category: Social Science

Page: 383

View: 4769

This 2001 book traces the history of the social Survey in Britain and the US, with two chapters on Germany and France. It discusses the aims and interests of those who carried out early surveys, and the links between the social survey and the growth of empirical social science.
Posted in Social Science

London Labour and the London Poor

A Cyclopaedia of the Condition and Earnings of Those that Will Work, Those that Cannot Work, and Those that Will Not Work

Author: Henry Mayhew

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Charities

Page: N.A

View: 3775

Posted in Charities

Mr Charles Booth's Inquiry

Life and Labour of the People in London, Reconsidered

Author: Rosemary O'Day

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1441134433

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 9673

Charles Booth's pioneering survey, Life and Labour of the People in London, published in 17 volumes between 1889 and 1903, was a landmark in empirical social investigation. His panorama of London life has dominated all subsequent accounts: its scope, precision and detail make it an unrivalled source for the period. Mr. Charles Booth's Inquiry is the first systematic account of the making of the survey, based upon an intensive examination of the huge Booth archive. This contains far more material than was eventually published, in particular on women, work, religion, education, housing and social relations, as well as on poverty. While the book acknowledges the leading role of Booth himself, it highlights the significance of the contributions of his associates, including Beatrice Potter (Webb), Octavia Hill, Llewellyn Smith and G.H. Duckworth. Life and Labour of the People in London is a founding text of both social history and modern sociology. It has however commonly been misunderstood and frequently misused. Mr Charles Booth's Inquiry sets the survey in perspective and demonstrates the richness of the Booth archive and its potential for modern scholarship in both history and the social sciences.
Posted in History

Researching London's Houses

An Archives Guide

Author: Colin Thom

Publisher: Phillimore

ISBN: N.A

Category: Architecture, Domestic

Page: 192

View: 2995

Posted in Architecture, Domestic

Hull-House Maps and Papers

A Presentation of Nationalities and Wages in a Congested District of Chicago, Together with Comments and Essays on Problems Growing Out of the Social Conditions

Author: Rima Lunin Schultz

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 0252031342

Category: Philosophy

Page: 178

View: 1236

Jane Addams s early attempt to empower the people with information"
Posted in Philosophy

Mapping London

Making Sense of the City

Author: Simon Foxell

Publisher: Black Dog Pub Limited

ISBN: 9781906155452

Category: Travel

Page: 288

View: 8371

Mapping London: Making Sense of the City is a beautiful, compelling anthology of over six centuries of London maps, tracing the mesmerising evolution of the city and exploring the hopes and fears of its inhabitants as history unfolds. Now released in Paperback. The book is a cartographic journey, charting the influence of Roman city planning, Saxon feudalism, Medieval tumult, imperial hubris, contemporary town planning and more on this great metropolis. It includes over 200 maps, from literary imaginings and utopian prophecies to portrayals of London in contemporary computer games, comics and online—as well as the timeless Monopoly board. The maps in this comprehensive survey are allowed to speak for themselves, revealing not only their political and social context, but also the dreams of their makers and the drama of their creation. The maps are often objects of great skill and beauty themselves, with the names of the greatest of their makers still revered today. Much more is revealed by the maps than the cartographers themselves could have envisaged, they provide enthralling insights into events including the Great Fire of London, the Plague and the Industrial Revolution. The city's more recent history is also investigated, including the irrevocable change of the two World Wars and the redevelopment planned for the 2012 Olympics. The book is split into four sections, each beginning with a short introduction and beautifully illustrated by the maps themselves: London Change and Growth; Serving the City; Living in the City; and Imagining London. Including engaging and illuminating essays exploring the history of the maps and how they have been used for social, political and commercial purposes, Mapping London: Making Sense of the City is a lavishly illustrated book which explores the city through the ages in all its labyrinthine glory. Perfect both for gifts and for all those serious about maps and cartography.
Posted in Travel