Black Silent Majority

The Rockefeller Drug Laws and the Politics of Punishment

Author: Michael Javen Fortner

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674496108

Category: Law

Page: 364

View: 8309

Aggressive policing and draconian sentencing have disproportionately imprisoned millions of African Americans for drug-related offenses. Michael Javen Fortner shows that in the 1970s these punitive policies toward addicts and pushers enjoyed the support of many working-class and middle-class blacks, angry about the chaos in their own neighborhoods.
Posted in Law

Black Silent Majority

The Rockefeller Drug Laws and the Politics of Punishment

Author: Michael Javen Fortner

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674743997

Category: History

Page: 350

View: 9382

Aggressive policing and draconian sentencing have disproportionately imprisoned millions of African Americans for drug-related offenses. Michael Javen Fortner shows that in the 1970s these punitive policies toward addicts and pushers enjoyed the support of many working-class and middle-class blacks, angry about the chaos in their own neighborhoods.
Posted in History

Authentically Black

Essays for the Black Silent Majority

Author: John McWhorter

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781592400461

Category: Social Science

Page: 279

View: 4431

A new collection of thought-provoking essays by the best-selling author of Losing the Race examines what it means to be black in modern-day America, addressing such issues as racial profiling, the reparations movement, film and TV stereotypes, diversity, affirmative action, and hip-hop, while calling for the advancement of true racial equality. Reprint.
Posted in Social Science

The Silent Majority

Suburban Politics in the Sunbelt South

Author: Matthew D. Lassiter

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 140084942X

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 4967

Suburban sprawl transformed the political culture of the American South as much as the civil rights movement did during the second half of the twentieth century. The Silent Majority provides the first regionwide account of the suburbanization of the South from the perspective of corporate leaders, political activists, and especially of the ordinary families who lived in booming Sunbelt metropolises such as Atlanta, Charlotte, and Richmond. Matthew Lassiter examines crucial battles over racial integration, court-ordered busing, and housing segregation to explain how the South moved from the era of Jim Crow fully into the mainstream of national currents. During the 1960s and 1970s, the grassroots mobilization of the suburban homeowners and school parents who embraced Richard Nixon's label of the Silent Majority reshaped southern and national politics and helped to set in motion the center-right shift that has dominated the United States ever since. The Silent Majority traces the emergence of a "color-blind" ideology in the white middle-class suburbs that defended residential segregation and neighborhood schools as the natural outcomes of market forces and individual meritocracy rather than the unconstitutional products of discriminatory public policies. Connecting local and national stories, and reintegrating southern and American history, The Silent Majority is critical reading for those interested in urban and suburban studies, political and social history, the civil rights movement, public policy, and the intersection of race and class in modern America.
Posted in History

The Long Song

A Novel

Author: Andrea Levy

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN: 9781429929882

Category: Fiction

Page: 320

View: 2508

THE AUTHOR OF SMALL ISLAND TELLS THE STORY OF THE LAST TURBULENT YEARS OF SLAVERY AND THE EARLY YEARS OF FREEDOM IN NINETEENTH-CENTURY JAMAICA Small Island introduced Andrea Levy to America and was acclaimed as "a triumph" (San Francisco Chronicle). It won both the Orange Prize and the Whitbread Book of the Year Award, and has sold over a million copies worldwide. With The Long Song, Levy once again reinvents the historical novel. Told in the irresistibly willful and intimate voice of Miss July, with some editorial assistance from her son, Thomas, The Long Song is at once defiant, funny, and shocking. The child of a field slave on the Amity sugar plantation, July lives with her mother until Mrs. Caroline Mortimer, a recently transplanted English widow, decides to move her into the great house and rename her "Marguerite." Resourceful and mischievous, July soon becomes indispensable to her mistress. Together they live through the bloody Baptist war, followed by the violent and chaotic end of slavery. Taught to read and write so that she can help her mistress run the business, July remains bound to the plantation despite her "freedom." It is the arrival of a young English overseer, Robert Goodwin, that will dramatically change life in the great house for both July and her mistress. Prompted and provoked by her son's persistent questioning, July's resilience and heartbreak are gradually revealed in this extraordinarily powerful story of slavery, revolution, freedom, and love.
Posted in Fiction

The Invisible Bridge

The Fall of Nixon and the Rise of Reagan

Author: Rick Perlstein

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1476782423

Category: History

Page: 880

View: 9708

The best-selling author of Nixonland presents a portrait of the United States during the turbulent political and economic upheavals of the 1970s, covering events ranging from the Arab oil embargo and the era of Patty Hearst to the collapse of the South Vietnamese government and the rise of Ronald Reagan.
Posted in History

Inventing the Silent Majority in Western Europe and the United States

Author: Anna von der Goltz,Britta Waldschmidt-Nelson

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107165423

Category: History

Page: 422

View: 8864

For historians of social movements, this text explores 1960s and 1970s conservative political activism in the US and Western Europe.
Posted in History

By Silent Majority

Author: Robert Buschel

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 168261056X

Category: Fiction

Page: 352

View: 2600

President Daniel Carlson is the most popular president in history. But he has a secret big enough to bring down his whole administration. It wasn't the marijuana he smoked after graduating from Harvard. It wasn't the fact he won the presidency with the help of computer phenoms hired to hack into an electronic voting source code. It wasn't that his political family wasn't pure. Only days before the vote for his next election, his chief of staff informs him, "They know, Daniel." Dreams will be shattered. Lives are in danger. Can America handle the truth?
Posted in Fiction

The Sweetheart of the Silent Majority

The Biography of Phyllis Schlafly

Author: Carol Felsenthal

Publisher: Doubleday Books

ISBN: N.A

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 337

View: 2810

A revealing look at the private life and public convictions of Phyllis Schlafly chronicles her rise to national prominence as an archconservative and a determined opponent of the Equal Rights Amendment, gay rights, and reproductive freedom
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

Locking Up Our Own

Crime and Punishment in Black America

Author: James Forman, Jr.

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN: 0374712905

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 409

In recent years, America’s criminal justice system has become the subject of an increasingly urgent debate. Critics have assailed the rise of mass incarceration, emphasizing its disproportionate impact on people of color. As James Forman, Jr., points out, however, the war on crime that began in the 1970s was supported by many African American leaders in the nation’s urban centers. In Locking Up Our Own, he seeks to understand why. Forman shows us that the first substantial cohort of black mayors, judges, and police chiefs took office amid a surge in crime and drug addiction. Many prominent black officials, including Washington, D.C. mayor Marion Barry and federal prosecutor Eric Holder, feared that the gains of the civil rights movement were being undermined by lawlessness—and thus embraced tough-on-crime measures, including longer sentences and aggressive police tactics. In the face of skyrocketing murder rates and the proliferation of open-air drug markets, they believed they had no choice. But the policies they adopted would have devastating consequences for residents of poor black neighborhoods. A former D.C. public defender, Forman tells riveting stories of politicians, community activists, police officers, defendants, and crime victims. He writes with compassion about individuals trapped in terrible dilemmas—from the men and women he represented in court to officials struggling to respond to a public safety emergency. Locking Up Our Own enriches our understanding of why our society became so punitive and offers important lessons to anyone concerned about the future of race and the criminal justice system in this country.
Posted in Social Science

Colored Amazons

Crime, Violence, and Black Women in the City of Brotherly Love, 1880–1910

Author: Kali N. Gross

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822337997

Category: History

Page: 260

View: 5441

For the state, black female crime and its representations effectively galvanized and justified a host of urban reform initiatives that reaffirmed white, middle-class authority."--Jacket.
Posted in History

The Argentine Silent Majority

Middle Classes, Politics, Violence, and Memory in the Seventies

Author: Sebastián Carassai

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822376571

Category: History

Page: 376

View: 2806

In The Argentine Silent Majority, Sebastián Carassai focuses on middle-class culture and politics in Argentina from the end of the 1960s. By considering the memories and ideologies of middle-class Argentines who did not get involved in political struggles, he expands thinking about the era to the larger society that activists and direct victims of state terror were part of and claimed to represent. Carassai conducted interviews with 200 people, mostly middle-class non-activists, but also journalists, politicians, scholars, and artists who were politically active during the 1970s. To account for local differences, he interviewed people from three sites: Buenos Aires; Tucumán, a provincial capital rocked by political turbulence; and Correa, a small town which did not experience great upheaval. He showed the middle-class non-activists a documentary featuring images and audio of popular culture and events from the 1970s. In the end Carassai concludes that, during the years of la violencia, members of the middle-class silent majority at times found themselves in agreement with radical sectors as they too opposed military authoritarianism but they never embraced a revolutionary program such as that put forward by the guerrilla groups or the most militant sectors of the labor movement.
Posted in History

Nixonland

The Rise of a President and the Fracturing of America

Author: Rick Perlstein

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781451606263

Category: History

Page: 896

View: 5154

An exciting e-format containing 27 video clips taken directly from the CBS news archive of a brilliant, best-selling account of the Nixon era by one of America’s most talented young historians. Between 1965 and 1972 America experienced a second civil war. Out of its ashes, the political world we know today was born. Nixonland begins in the blood and fire of the Watts riots-one week after President Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act, and nine months after his historic landslide victory over Barry Goldwater seemed to have heralded a permanent liberal consensus. The next year scores of liberals were thrown out of Congress, America was more divided than ever-and a disgraced politician was on his way to a shocking comeback: Richard Nixon. Six years later, President Nixon, harvesting the bitterness and resentment borne of that blood and fire, was reelected in a landslide even bigger than Johnson's, and the outlines of today's politics of red-and-blue division became already distinct. Cataclysms tell the story of Nixonland: • Angry blacks burning down their neighborhoods, while suburbanites defend home and hearth with shotguns. • The civil war over Vietnam, the assassinations, the riot at the Democratic National Convention. • Richard Nixon acceding to the presidency pledging a new dawn of national unity--and governing more divisively than any before him. • The rise of twin cultures of left- and right-wing vigilantes, Americans literally bombing and cutting each other down in the streets over political differences. •And, finally, Watergate, the fruit of a president who rose by matching his own anxieties and dreads with those of an increasingly frightened electorate--but whose anxieties and dreads produced a criminal conspiracy in the Oval Office.
Posted in History

The Great Silent Majority

Nixon's 1969 Speech on Vietnamization

Author: Karlyn Kohrs Campbell

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 1623490340

Category: Political Science

Page: 152

View: 5997

In his televised and widely watched speech to the nation on November 3, 1969, Pres. Richard M. Nixon introduced a phrase—“silent majority”—and a policy—Vietnamization of the war effort—that echo down to the present day. Nixon’s appearance on this night framed the terms in which much of the subsequent civil conflict and military strategy would be understood. Rhetorical scholar Karlyn Kohrs Campbell analyzes this critically important speech in light of the historical context and its centrality to three other speeches–two earlier and one the following spring, when the announcement of the US invasion of Cambodia brought a far different response. She also sheds light on a discourse that generated much heat in a nation already seriously divided in its support of the war in Vietnam. The first single volume dedicated to this speech, this addition to the distinguished Library of Presidential Rhetoric provides the speech text, a summary of its context, its rhetorical elements, and the disciplinary analyses that have developed.
Posted in Political Science

The real majority

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 2016

Posted in

Whitetown, U.S.A.

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 6608

Posted in

Winning the Race

Beyond the Crisis in Black America

Author: John McWhorter

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101216778

Category: Social Science

Page: 448

View: 4487

In his first major book on the state of black America since the New York Times bestseller Losing the Race, John McWhorter argues that a renewed commitment to achievement and integration is the only cure for the crisis in the African-American community. Winning the Race examines the roots of the serious problems facing black Americans today—poverty, drugs, and high incarceration rates—and contends that none of the commonly accepted reasons can explain the decline of black communities since the end of segregation in the 1960s. Instead, McWhorter posits that a sense of victimhood and alienation that came to the fore during the civil rights era has persisted to the present day in black culture, even though most blacks today have never experienced the racism of the segregation era. McWhorter traces the effects of this disempowering conception of black identity, from the validation of living permanently on welfare to gansta rap’s glorification of irresponsibility and violence as a means of “protest.” He discusses particularly specious claims of racism, attacks the destructive posturing of black leaders and the “hip-hop academics,” and laments that a successful black person must be faced with charges of “acting white.” While acknowledging that racism still exists in America today, McWhorter argues that both blacks and whites must move past blaming racism for every challenge blacks face, and outlines the steps necessary for improving the future of black America.
Posted in Social Science

The Loneliness of the Black Republican

Pragmatic Politics and the Pursuit of Power

Author: Leah Wright Rigueur

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400852439

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 2845

Covering more than four decades of American social and political history, The Loneliness of the Black Republican examines the ideas and actions of black Republican activists, officials, and politicians, from the era of the New Deal to Ronald Reagan's presidential ascent in 1980. Their unique stories reveal African Americans fighting for an alternative economic and civil rights movement—even as the Republican Party appeared increasingly hostile to that very idea. Black party members attempted to influence the direction of conservatism—not to destroy it, but rather to expand the ideology to include black needs and interests. As racial minorities in their political party and as political minorities within their community, black Republicans occupied an irreconcilable position—they were shunned by African American communities and subordinated by the GOP. In response, black Republicans vocally, and at times viciously, critiqued members of their race and party, in an effort to shape the attitudes and public images of black citizens and the GOP. And yet, there was also a measure of irony to black Republicans' "loneliness": at various points, factions of the Republican Party, such as the Nixon administration, instituted some of the policies and programs offered by black party members. What's more, black Republican initiatives, such as the fair housing legislation of senator Edward Brooke, sometimes garnered support from outside the Republican Party, especially among the black press, Democratic officials, and constituents of all races. Moving beyond traditional liberalism and conservatism, black Republicans sought to address African American racial experiences in a distinctly Republican way. The Loneliness of the Black Republican provides a new understanding of the interaction between African Americans and the Republican Party, and the seemingly incongruous intersection of civil rights and American conservatism.
Posted in History

Black Republicans and the Transformation of the GOP

Author: Joshua D. Farrington

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812293266

Category: History

Page: 328

View: 4815

Reflecting on his fifty-year effort to steer the Grand Old Party toward black voters, Memphis power broker George W. Lee declared, "Somebody had to stay in the Republican Party and fight." As Joshua Farrington recounts in his comprehensive history, Lee was one of many black Republican leaders who remained loyal after the New Deal inspired black voters to switch their allegiance from the "party of Lincoln" to the Democrats. Ideologically and demographically diverse, the ranks of twentieth-century black Republicans included Southern patronage dispensers like Lee and Robert Church, Northern critics of corrupt Democratic urban machines like Jackie Robinson and Archibald Carey, civil rights agitators like Grant Reynolds and T. R. M. Howard, elected politicians like U.S. Senator Edward W. Brooke and Kentucky state legislator Charles W. Anderson, black nationalists like Floyd McKissick and Nathan Wright, and scores of grassroots organizers from Atlanta to Los Angeles. Black Republicans believed that a two-party system in which both parties were forced to compete for the African American vote was the best way to obtain stronger civil rights legislation. Though they were often pushed to the sidelines by their party's white leadership, their continuous and vocal inner-party dissent helped moderate the GOP's message and platform through the 1970s. And though often excluded from traditional narratives of U.S. politics, black Republicans left an indelible mark on the history of their party, the civil rights movement, and twentieth-century political development. Black Republicans and the Transformation of the GOP marshals an impressive amount of archival material at the national, state, and municipal levels in the South, Midwest, and West, as well as in the better-known Northeast, to open up new avenues in African American political history.
Posted in History

White Nationalism, Black Interests

Conservative Public Policy and the Black Community

Author: Ronald W. Walters

Publisher: Wayne State University Press

ISBN: 9780814330203

Category: Political Science

Page: 339

View: 6207

A study of the most racially conscious aspect of the Conservative movement and its impact on politics and current public policy.
Posted in Political Science