Before Social Anthropology

Essays on the History of British Anthropology

Author: James Urry

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136644245

Category: Social Science

Page: 188

View: 4625

First Published in 1993. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Posted in Social Science

Recreating First Contact

Expeditions, Anthropology, and Popular Culture

Author: Joshua A. Bell,Alison K. Brown,Robert J. Gordon

Publisher: Smithsonian Institution

ISBN: 1935623249

Category: Social Science

Page: 275

View: 923

Recreating First Contact explores themes related to the proliferation of adventure travel which emerged during the early twentieth century and that were legitimized by their associations with popular views of anthropology. During this period, new transport and recording technologies, particularly the airplane and automobile and small, portable, still and motion-picture cameras, were utilized by a variety of expeditions to document the last untouched places of the globe and bring them home to eager audiences. These expeditions were frequently presented as first contact encounters and enchanted popular imagination. The various narratives encoded in the articles, books, films, exhibitions and lecture tours that these expeditions generated fed into pre-existing stereotypes about racial and technological difference, and helped to create them anew in popular culture. Through an unpacking of expeditions and their popular wakes, the essays (12 chapters, a preface, introduction and afterward) trace the complex but obscured relationships between anthropology, adventure travel and the cinematic imagination that the 1920s and 1930s engendered and how their myths have endured. The book further explores the effects - both positive and negative - of such expeditions on the discipline of anthropology itself. However, in doing so, this volume examines these impacts from a variety of national perspectives and thus through these different vantage points creates a more nuanced perspective on how expeditions were at once a global phenomenon but also culturally ordered.
Posted in Social Science

Anthropology and Anthropologists

The Modern British School

Author: Adam Kuper

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136802207

Category: Social Science

Page: 248

View: 6214

On its first publication in 1973 Adam Kuper's entertaining history of half a century of British social anthropology provoked strong reactions. But his often irreverent account soon established itself as one of the introductions to anthropology. Since the second revised edition was published in 1983, important developments have occurred within British and European anthropology. This third, enlarged and updated edition responds to these fresh currents. Adam Kuper takes the story up to the present day, and a new final chapter traces the emergence of a modern European social anthropology in contrast with developments in American cultural anthropology over the last two decades. Anthropology and Anthropologists provides a critical historical account of modern British social anthropology: it describes the careers of the major theorists, their ideas and their contributions in the context of the intellectual and institutional environments in which they worked.
Posted in Social Science

Anthropologists in a Wider World

Essays on Field Research

Author: Paul Dresch,Wendy James,David J. Parkin

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 9781571818003

Category: Social Science

Page: 310

View: 9479

The tradition of intensive fieldwork by a single anthropologist in one area has been challenged by new emphasis on studying historical patterns, wider regions, and global networks. Some anthropologists have started their careers from the new vantage point, amidst a chorus of claims for innovative methodologies. Others have lived through these changes of perspective and are able to reflect on them, while re-evaluating the place of fieldwork within the broader aims of general anthropology. This book explores these transformations of world view and approach as they have been experienced by anthropological colleagues, a number of whom began their work very much in the earlier tradition. They cover experiences of field research in Africa, Papua New Guinea, South America, Central and South Asia, Europe, the Middle East, Indonesia, Japan and China. Constant through the chapters is a distinctively qualitative empirical approach, once associated with the village but now being developed in relation to large-scale or dispersed communities.
Posted in Social Science

From Antiquarian to Archaeologist

The History and Philosophy of Archaeology

Author: Tim Murray

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 1473835119

Category: Social Science

Page: 261

View: 6959

This volume forms a collection of papers tracking the emergence of the history of archaeology from a subject of marginal status in the 1980s to the mainstream subject which it is today. Professor Timothy Murray's essays have been widely cited and track over 20 years in the development of the subject. ?The papers are accompanied by a new introduction which surveys the development of the subject over the last 25 years as well as a reflection of what this means for the philosophy of archaeology and theoretical archaeology.?This volume spans Tim's successful career as an academic at the forefront of the study of the history of archaeology, both in Australia and internationally. During his career he has held posts in Britain and Europe as well as Australia. He has edited The Bulletin of the History of Archaeology since 2003.
Posted in Social Science

North American Indian Anthropology

Essays on Society and Culture

Author: Raymond J. DeMallie

Publisher: VNR AG

ISBN: 9780806126142

Category: Social Science

Page: 430

View: 6321

"These essays explore the blending of structural and historical approaches to American Indian anthropology that characterizes the perspective developed by the late Fred Eggan and his students at the University of Chicago. They include studies of kinship and social organization, politics, religion, law, ethnicity, and art. Many reflect Eggan's method of controlled comparison, a tool for reconstructing social and cultural change over time." "Together these essays make substantial descriptive contributions to American Indian anthropology, presenting contemporary interpretations of diverse groups from the Hudson Bay Inuit in the north to the Highland Maya of Chiapas in the south. The collection will serve as an introduction to Native American social and cultural anthropology for readers interested in the dynamics of Indian social life."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved
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Zuwanderung und Integration

Author: Christoph Köck, Alois Moosmüller, Klaus Roth

Publisher: Waxmann Verlag

ISBN: 9783830964056

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 8264

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On Durkheim's Elementary Forms of Religious Life

Author: N.J. Allen,W.S.F. Pickering,W. Watts Miller

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134715013

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 2504

This is the first collection of essays to be published on Durkheim's masterpiece The Elementary Forms of Religious Life. It represents the work of the most important international Durkheim scholars from the fields of anthropology, philosophy and sociology. The essays focus on key topics including: * the method Durkheim adopted in his study * the role of ritual and belief in society * the nature of contemporary religion The contributors also explore cutting-edge debates about the notion of the soul and collective rituals.
Posted in Social Science

Slavery in Africa

Historical and Anthropological Perspectives

Author: Suzanne Miers,Igor Kopytoff

Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press

ISBN: 9780299073343

Category: History

Page: 474

View: 5996

This collection of sixteen short papers, together with a complex and very much longer introductory essay by the editors on "African 'Slavery' as an Institution of Marginality," constitutes an impressive attempt by anthropologists and historians to explore, describe, and analyze some of the various kinds of human bondage within a number of precolonial African societies. It is important to note that in spite of the precolonial emphasis of the volume, all of the essays are based at least partly on anthropological or ethnohistorical field research carried out since 1959. All but one have been augmented greatly by more conventional historical research in published as well as archival sources. And although the volume's focus is upon the structures and conditions of servitude within the several African societies described, many of the essays illustrate, and some discuss, the conceptual as well as the practical difficulties of separating the institutions and customs of "domestic" African slavery from those of the European dominated commercial slave trade in which many of the societies participated. -- from JSTOR http://www.jstor.org (May 24, 2013).
Posted in History

Observers Observed

Essays on Ethnographic Fieldwork

Author: George W. Stocking

Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press

ISBN: 9780299094539

Category: Social Science

Page: 248

View: 8646

History of Anthropology is a new series of annual volumes, each of which will treat an important theme in the history of anthropological inquiry. For this initial volume, the editors have chosen to focus on the modern cultural anthropology: intensive fieldwork by "participant observation." Observers Observed includes essays by a distinguished group of historians and anthropologists covering major episodes in the history of ethnographic fieldwork in the American, British, and French traditions since 1880. As the first work to investigate the development of modern fieldwork in a serious historical way, this collection will be of great interest and value to anthropologist, historians of science and the social sciences, and the general readers interested in the way in which modern anthropologists have perceived and described the cultures of "others." Included in this volume are the contributions of Homer G. Barnett, University of Oregon; James Clifford, University of California, Santa Cruz; Douglas Cole, Simon Frazer University; Richard Handler, Lake Forest College; Curtis Hinsley, Colgate University; Joan Larcom, Mount Holyoke College; Paul Rabinow, University of California, Berkeley; and the editor.
Posted in Social Science

Genealogies for the Present in Cultural Anthropology

Author: Bruce M. Knauft

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136661344

Category: Social Science

Page: 392

View: 4133

In the wake of tensions between modern and postmodern sensibilities, what larger directions now emerge in cultural anthropology? In this major work, Bruce Knauft takes stock of important recent initiatives in cultural and critical theory. By combining critical reviews and ethnographic engagements with fresh readings of major figures and approaches, the work develops a larger vantage point for considering the dispersing influence of practice theories, postmodernism, cultural studies, postcolonial studies, modern/post-positive feminism, and multicultural criticisms.
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Historical Abstracts

Modern history abstracts, 1450-1914

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: History, Modern

Page: N.A

View: 5401

Posted in History, Modern

A History of Archaeological Thought

Author: Bruce G. Trigger

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107717620

Category: Social Science

Page: 732

View: 1487

In its original edition, Bruce Trigger's book was the first ever to examine the history of archaeological thought from medieval times to the present in world-wide perspective. Now, in this new edition, he both updates the original work and introduces new archaeological perspectives and concerns. At once stimulating and even-handed, it places the development of archaeological thought and theory throughout within a broad social and intellectual framework. The successive but interacting trends apparent in archaeological thought are defined and the author seeks to determine the extent to which these trends were a reflection of the personal and collective interests of archaeologists as these relate - in the West at least - to the fluctuating fortunes of the middle classes. While subjective influences have been powerful, Professor Trigger argues that the gradual accumulation of archaeological data has exercised a growing constraint on interpretation. In turn, this has increased the objectivity of archaeological research and enhanced its value for understanding the entire span of human history and the human condition in general.
Posted in Social Science

Anxieties of Empire and the Fiction of Intrigue

Author: Yumna Siddiqi

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231510861

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 304

View: 4752

Focusing on late nineteenth- and twentieth-century stories of detection, policing, and espionage by British and South Asian writers, Yumna Siddiqi presents an original and compelling exploration of the cultural anxieties created by imperialism. She suggests that while colonial writers use narratives of intrigue to endorse imperial rule, postcolonial writers turn the generic conventions and topography of the fiction of intrigue on its head, launching a critique of imperial power that makes the repressive and emancipatory impulses of postcolonial modernity visible. Siddiqi devotes the first part of her book to the colonial fiction of Arthur Conan Doyle and John Buchan, in which the British regime's preoccupation with maintaining power found its voice. The rationalization of difference, pronouncedly expressed through the genre's strategies of representation and narrative resolution, helped to reinforce domination and, in some cases, allay fears concerning the loss of colonial power. In the second part, Siddiqi argues that late twentieth-century South Asian writers also underscore the state's insecurities, but unlike British imperial writers, they take a critical view of the state's authoritarian tendencies. Such writers as Amitav Ghosh, Michael Ondaatje, Arundhati Roy, and Salman Rushdie use the conventions of detective and spy fiction in creative ways to explore the coercive actions of the postcolonial state and the power dynamics of a postcolonial New Empire. Drawing on the work of leading theorists of imperialism such as Edward Said, Frantz Fanon, and the Subaltern Studies historians, Siddiqi reveals how British writers express the anxious workings of a will to maintain imperial power in their writing. She also illuminates the ways South Asian writers portray the paradoxes of postcolonial modernity and trace the ruses and uses of reason in a world where the modern marks a horizon not only of hope but also of economic, military, and ecological disaster.
Posted in Literary Criticism

Before Boas

The Genesis of Ethnography and Ethnology in the German Enlightenment

Author: Han F. Vermeulen

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803277385

Category: History

Page: 760

View: 774

The history of anthropology has been written from multiple viewpoints, often from perspectives of gender, nationality, theory, or politics. Before Boas delves deeper into issues concerning anthropology's academic origins to present a groundbreaking study that reveals how ethnology and ethnography originated during the eighteenth rather than the nineteenth century, developing parallel to anthropology, or the "natural history of man." Han F. Vermeulen explores primary and secondary sources from Russia, Germany, Austria, the United States, the Netherlands, Hungary, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, France, and Great Britain in tracing how "ethnography" was begun as field research by German-speaking historians and naturalists in Siberia (Russia) during the 1730s and 1740s, was generalized as "ethnology" by scholars in G�ttingen (Germany) and Vienna (Austria) during the 1770s and 1780s, and was subsequently adopted by researchers in other countries. Before Boas argues that anthropology and ethnology were separate sciences during the Age of Reason, studying racial and ethnic diversity, respectively. Ethnography and ethnology focused not on "other" cultures but on all peoples of all eras. Following G. W. Leibniz, researchers in these fields categorized peoples primarily according to their languages. Franz Boas professionalized the holistic study of anthropology from the 1880s into the twentieth century.
Posted in History

Cambridge and the Torres Strait

Centenary Essays on the 1898 Anthropological Expedition

Author: Anita Herle,Sandra Rouse

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521584616

Category: Social Science

Page: 252

View: 6194

Centenary volume of the Torres Strait Expedition suggesting new ways of looking at its work.
Posted in Social Science

Race, Culture, and Evolution

Essays in the History of Anthropology

Author: George W. Stocking, Jr,Jr. George W. Stocking

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226774947

Category: Social Science

Page: 380

View: 2414

Essays in the history of anthropology cover such topics as the image of primitive man in evolutionary anthology and a historical analysis of the scientific reaction against cultural anthropology in the early twentieth century.
Posted in Social Science

Malinowski, Rivers, Benedict and Others

Essays on Culture and Personality

Author: George W. Stocking

Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press

ISBN: 9780299107338

Category: Social Science

Page: 266

View: 1535

History of Anthropology is a series of annual volumes, inaugurated in 1983, each of which treats a theme of major importance in both the history and current practice of anthropological inquiry. Drawing its title from a poem of W. H. Auden's, the present volume, Malinowski, Rivers, Benedict, and Others (the fourth in the series) focuses on the emergence of anthropological interest in "culture and personality" during the 1920s and 1930s. It also explores the historical, cultural, literary, and biological background of major figures associated with the movement, including Bronislaw Manlinowski, Edward Sapir, Abram Kardiner, Ruth Benedict, Margaret Mead, and Gregory Bateson. Born in the aftermath of World War I, flowering in the years before and after World War II, severely attacked in the 1950s and 1960s, "culture and personality" was subsequently reborn as "psychological anthropology." Whether this foreshadows the emergence of a major anthropological subdiscipline (equivalent to cultural, social, biological, or linguistic anthropology) from the current welter of "adjectival" anthropologies remain to be seen. In the meantime, the essays collected in the volume may encourage a rethinking of the historical roots of many issues of current concern. Included in this volume are the contributions of Jeremy MacClancy, William C. Manson, William Jackson, Richard Handler, Regna Darnell, Virginia Yans-McLaughlin, James A. Boon, and the editor.
Posted in Social Science