Arrested Justice

Black Women, Violence, and America’s Prison Nation

Author: Beth E. Richie

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814708226

Category: Social Science

Page: 244

View: 9603

Black women in marginalized communities are uniquely at risk of battering, rape, sexual harassment, stalking and incest. Through the compelling stories of Black women who have been most affected by racism, persistent poverty, class inequality, limited access to support resources or institutions, Beth E. Richie shows that the threat of violence to Black women has never been more serious, demonstrating how conservative legal, social, political and economic policies have impacted activism in the U.S.-based movement to end violence against women. Richie argues that Black women face particular peril because of the ways that race and culture have not figured centrally enough in the analysis of the causes and consequences of gender violence. As a result, the extent of physical, sexual and other forms of violence in the lives of Black women, the various forms it takes, and the contexts within which it occurs are minimized—at best—and frequently ignored. Arrested Justice brings issues of sexuality, class, age, and criminalization into focus right alongside of questions of public policy and gender violence, resulting in a compelling critique, a passionate re-framing of stories, and a call to action for change.
Posted in Social Science

Arrested Justice

Black Women, Violence, and America's Prison Nation

Author: Beth Richie

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 081477623X

Category: Social Science

Page: 229

View: 6340

Posted in Social Science

Arrested Justice

Black Women, Violence, and America's Prison Nation

Author: Beth Richie

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814776221

Category: History

Page: 229

View: 7091

Black women in marginalized communities are uniquely at risk of battering, rape, sexual harassment, stalking and incest. Through the compelling stories of Black women who have been most affected by racism, persistent poverty, class inequality, limited access to support resources or institutions, Beth E. Richie shows that the threat of violence to Black women has never been more serious, demonstrating how conservative legal, social, political and economic policies have impacted activism in the U.S.-based movement to end violence against women. Richie argues that Black women face particular peril because of the ways that race and culture have not figured centrally enough in the analysis of the causes and consequences of gender violence. As a result, the extent of physical, sexual and other forms of violence in the lives of Black women, the various forms it takes, and the contexts within which it occurs are minimized—at best—and frequently ignored. Arrested Justice brings issues of sexuality, class, age, and criminalization into focus right alongside of questions of public policy and gender violence, resulting in a compelling critique, a passionate re-framing of stories, and a call to action for change.
Posted in History

Fatherhood Arrested

Parenting from Within the Juvenile Justice System

Author: Anne Nurse

Publisher: Vanderbilt University Press

ISBN: 9780826514059

Category: Self-Help

Page: 166

View: 3880

Studies the effects that jail time and parole have on the relationships between young fathers and their children, with research revealing how the prison structure and its programs help fathers stay in touch with sons and daughters.
Posted in Self-Help

Arrested

Battling America's Criminal Justice System

Author: Dan Conaway, Esquire

Publisher: Hillcrest Publishing Group

ISBN: 1626527091

Category: Law

Page: 270

View: 8261

Learn how to protect yourself from the American criminal justice system. Arrested: Bottling America's Criminal Justice System is not a book for just anyone. After all, if you're a career criminal with no remorse, it probably won't help you-but it could. If, on the other hand, you are a good, decent, law-abiding citizen who happened to be in the wrong place at the wrong time-or know someone who was-or you just want to know more about the American criminal justice system, this book is definitely for you. Practicing criminal defense attorney Dan Conaway has written Arrested to help us all understand our rights and responsibilities as upstanding citizens of the country we live in. "The Beast"-as he refers to our criminal justice system-has very little in common with the way it is depicted on TV crime dramas. Clearing away the fiction, Conaway addresses the following real-world topics: What should you say if a police officer stops you to ask "just a few quick questions"? Why does it take so long for most cases to go to trial? How can you help a family member who has been accused of a crime? Although not intended as a substitute for professional legal counsel, Arrested can be used as a guide as you work your way through the maze of one of the most complicated systems on the planet. With the help of fact-based scenarios, Conaway shows us all what could happen to any of us if we're not careful. Along with explanations of how we have become a "zero-toleranee" society-as well as the good and bad inherent in that label-and practical, real-life examples to learn from, Arrested will give you both the background and the foresight to know how to handle yourself in almost any situation. Book jacket.
Posted in Law

Compelled to Crime

The Gender Entrapment of Battered, Black Women

Author: Beth Richie

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317325419

Category: Social Science

Page: 200

View: 7806

First published in 1996. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Posted in Social Science

When They Call You a Terrorist

A Black Lives Matter Memoir

Author: Patrisse Khan-Cullors,asha bandele

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN: 1250171091

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 304

View: 1891

The instant New York Times Bestseller The emotional and powerful story of one of the co-founders of Black Lives Matter and how the movement was born. "This remarkable book reveals what inspired Patrisse's visionary and courageous activism and forces us to face the consequence of the choices our nation made when we criminalized a generation. This book is a must-read for all of us." - Michelle Alexander, author of The New Jim Crow From one of the co-founders of the Black Lives Matter movement comes a poetic memoir and reflection on humanity. Necessary and timely, Patrisse Cullors’ story asks us to remember that protest in the interest of the most vulnerable comes from love. Leaders of the Black Lives Matter movement have been called terrorists, a threat to America. But in truth, they are loving women whose life experiences have led them to seek justice for those victimized by the powerful. In this meaningful, empowering account of survival, strength, and resilience, Patrisse Cullors and asha bandele seek to change the culture that declares innocent black life expendable.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

The Collapse of American Criminal Justice

Author: William J. Stuntz

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674051750

Category: Law

Page: 413

View: 571

Rule of law has vanished in America’s criminal justice system. Prosecutors decide whom to punish; most accused never face a jury; policing is inconsistent; plea bargaining is rampant; and draconian sentencing fills prisons with mostly minority defendants. A leading criminal law scholar looks to history for the roots of these problems—and solutions.
Posted in Law

Defending the Damned

Inside a Dark Corner of the Criminal Justice System

Author: Kevin Davis

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 0743270940

Category: Law

Page: 320

View: 7652

A member of Chicago's elite Murder Task Force unit describes the lives of its public defenders, many of whom juggle dozens of clients and death-row cases simultaneously, in a sobering account that focuses on the dramatic trial of an accused cop killer. Reprint.
Posted in Law

Chokehold

Policing Black Men

Author: Paul Butler

Publisher: The New Press

ISBN: 1620974983

Category: Law

Page: N.A

View: 2654

Nominated for the 49th NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Literary Work (Nonfiction) A 2017 Washington Post Notable Book A Kirkus Best Book of 2017 “Butler has hit his stride. This is a meditation, a sonnet, a legal brief, a poetry slam and a dissertation that represents the full bloom of his early thesis: The justice system does not work for blacks, particularly black men.” —The Washington Post “The most readable and provocative account of the consequences of the war on drugs since Michelle Alexander’s The New Jim Crow . . . .” —The New York Times Book Review “Powerful . . . deeply informed from a legal standpoint and yet in some ways still highly personal” —The Times Literary Supplement (London) With the eloquence of Ta-Nehisi Coates and the persuasive research of Michelle Alexander, a former federal prosecutor explains how the system really works, and how to disrupt it Cops, politicians, and ordinary people are afraid of black men. The result is the Chokehold: laws and practices that treat every African American man like a thug. In this explosive new book, an African American former federal prosecutor shows that the system is working exactly the way it’s supposed to. Black men are always under watch, and police violence is widespread—all with the support of judges and politicians. In his no-holds-barred style, Butler, whose scholarship has been featured on 60 Minutes, uses new data to demonstrate that white men commit the majority of violent crime in the United States. For example, a white woman is ten times more likely to be raped by a white male acquaintance than be the victim of a violent crime perpetrated by a black man. Butler also frankly discusses the problem of black on black violence and how to keep communities safer—without relying as much on police. Chokehold powerfully demonstrates why current efforts to reform law enforcement will not create lasting change. Butler’s controversial recommendations about how to crash the system, and when it’s better for a black man to plead guilty—even if he’s innocent—are sure to be game-changers in the national debate about policing, criminal justice, and race relations.
Posted in Law

The Divide

American Injustice in the Age of the Wealth Gap

Author: Matt Taibbi

Publisher: Spiegel & Grau

ISBN: 0679645462

Category: Political Science

Page: 448

View: 5546

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY THE WASHINGTON POST, NPR, AND KIRKUS REVIEWS A scathing portrait of an urgent new American crisis Over the last two decades, America has been falling deeper and deeper into a statistical mystery: Poverty goes up. Crime goes down. The prison population doubles. Fraud by the rich wipes out 40 percent of the world’s wealth. The rich get massively richer. No one goes to jail. In search of a solution, journalist Matt Taibbi discovered the Divide, the seam in American life where our two most troubling trends—growing wealth inequality and mass incarceration—come together, driven by a dramatic shift in American citizenship: Our basic rights are now determined by our wealth or poverty. The Divide is what allows massively destructive fraud by the hyperwealthy to go unpunished, while turning poverty itself into a crime—but it’s impossible to see until you look at these two alarming trends side by side. In The Divide, Matt Taibbi takes readers on a galvanizing journey through both sides of our new system of justice—the fun-house-mirror worlds of the untouchably wealthy and the criminalized poor. He uncovers the startling looting that preceded the financial collapse; a wild conspiracy of billionaire hedge fund managers to destroy a company through dirty tricks; and the story of a whistleblower who gets in the way of the largest banks in America, only to find herself in the crosshairs. On the other side of the Divide, Taibbi takes us to the front lines of the immigrant dragnet; into the newly punitive welfare system which treats its beneficiaries as thieves; and deep inside the stop-and-frisk world, where standing in front of your own home has become an arrestable offense. As he narrates these incredible stories, he draws out and analyzes their common source: a perverse new standard of justice, based on a radical, disturbing new vision of civil rights. Through astonishing—and enraging—accounts of the high-stakes capers of the wealthy and nightmare stories of regular people caught in the Divide’s punishing logic, Taibbi lays bare one of the greatest challenges we face in contemporary American life: surviving a system that devours the lives of the poor, turns a blind eye to the destructive crimes of the wealthy, and implicates us all. Praise for The Divide “Ambitious . . . deeply reported, highly compelling . . . impossible to put down.”—The New York Times Book Review “These are the stories that will keep you up at night. . . . The Divide is not just a report from the new America; it is advocacy journalism at its finest.”—Los Angeles Times “Taibbi is a relentless investigative reporter. He takes readers inside not only investment banks, hedge funds and the blood sport of short-sellers, but into the lives of the needy, minorities, street drifters and illegal immigrants. . . . The Divide is an important book. Its documentation is powerful and shocking.”—The Washington Post “Captivating . . . The Divide enshrines its author’s position as one of the most important voices in contemporary American journalism.”—The Independent (UK) “Taibbi [is] perhaps the greatest reporter on Wall Street’s crimes in the modern era.”—Salon From the Hardcover edition.
Posted in Political Science

Let's Get Free

A Hip-Hop Theory of Justice

Author: Paul Butler

Publisher: The New Press

ISBN: 1595585109

Category: Law

Page: 224

View: 3127

Drawing on his personal fascinating story as a prosecutor, a defendant, and an observer of the legal process, Paul Butler offers a sharp and engaging critique of our criminal justice system. He argues against discriminatory drug laws and excessive police power and shows how our policy of mass incarceration erodes communities and perpetuates crime. Controversially, he supports jury nullification—or voting “not guilty” out of principle—as a way for everyday people to take a stand against unfair laws, and he joins with the “Stop Snitching” movement, arguing that the reliance on informants leads to shoddy police work and distrust within communities. Butler offers instead a “hip hop theory of justice,” parsing the messages about crime and punishment found in urban music and culture. Butler’s argument is powerful, edgy, and incisive.
Posted in Law

A Promise of Justice

The Eighteen-Year Fight to Save Four Innocent Men

Author: David Protess,Rob Warden

Publisher: Hyperion

ISBN: N.A

Category: True Crime

Page: 288

View: 8548

The dramatic true story of how a journalist, a professor, and three students solved a murder and helped free four wrongly convicted men after 18 years in prison.
Posted in True Crime

Starving for Justice

Hunger Strikes, Spectacular Speech, and the Struggle for Dignity

Author: Ralph Armbruster-Sandoval

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 0816532583

Category: History

Page: 305

View: 8982

"Focusing on three hunger strikes occurring on university campuses in California in the 1990s, Ralph Armbruster-Sandoval examines people's willingness to make the extreme sacrifice and give their lives for justice"--Provided by publisher.
Posted in History

Arrest-Proof Yourself

Author: Dale Carson,Wes Denham

Publisher: Chicago Review Press

ISBN: 1613748043

Category: Law

Page: 384

View: 2904

"Arrest-Proof Yourself will teach you everything you need to know about dirty cops, racial profiling, probable cause, search and seizure laws, your right to remain silent, and much more. This how-not-to guide will keep you safe and sound all year long." --Zink magazine What do you say if a cop pulls you over and asks to search your car? What if he gets up in your face and uses a racial slur? What if there's a roach in the ashtray? And what if your hot-headed teenage son is at the wheel? If you read this book, you'll know exactly what to do and say. More people than ever are getting arrested—usually for petty offenses against laws that rarely used to be enforced. And because arrest information is so easily available via the Internet, just one little arrest can disqualify you from jobs, financing, and education. This eye-opening book tells you everything you need to know about how cops operate, the little things that can get you in trouble, and how to stay free from the hungry jaws of the criminal justice system. It is now updated with new and important information on the right of the police to search your car; on guns, knives, and self-defense; and on changes in surveillance methods. Dale C. Carson was an FBI field agent, a SWAT sniper, an instructor at the FBI academy, and a Miami police officer who set Florida records for felony arrests. He is currently a criminal defense attorney. Wes Denham is the author of Arrested.
Posted in Law

Just Mercy (Adapted for Young Adults)

A True Story of the Fight for Justice

Author: Bryan A. Stevenson

Publisher: Delacorte Press

ISBN: 0525580050

Category: Young Adult Nonfiction

Page: 288

View: 5026

In this young adult adaptation of the acclaimed bestselling Just Mercy, which the New York Times calls "as compelling as To Kill a Mockingbird, and in some ways more so," Bryan Stevenson delves deep into the broken U.S. justice system, detailing from his personal experience his many challenges and efforts as a lawyer and social advocate, especially on behalf of America's most rejected and marginalized people. In this very personal work--proceeds of which will go to charity--Bryan Stevenson recounts many and varied stories of his work as a lawyer in the U.S. criminal justice system on behalf of those in society who have experienced some type of discrimination and/or have been wrongly accused of a crime and who deserve a powerful advocate and due justice under the law. Through the Equal Justice Initiative (EJI), an organization Stevenson founded as a young lawyer and for which he currently serves as Executive Director, this important work continues. EJI strives to end mass incarceration and excessive punishment in the United States, working to protect basic human rights for the most vulnerable people in American society. "A deeply moving collage of true stories . . . .This is required reading." --Kirkus, Starred Review Praise for Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption: "Important and compelling." --Pulitzer Prize-winning author TRACY KIDDER "Gripping. . . . What hangs in the balance is nothing less than the soul of a great nation." --DESMOND TUTU, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate "An inspiring and powerful story." --#1 New York Times bestselling author JOHN GRISHAM
Posted in Young Adult Nonfiction

A Murder in Virginia

Southern Justice on Trial

Author: Suzanne Lebsock

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 9780393326062

Category: History

Page: 442

View: 5392

Recounts the events surrounding the dramatic post-Civil War trial of a young African American sawmill hand who was accused of ax murdering a white woman on her Virginia farm and who implicated three other women in the crime. Reprint.
Posted in History

They Can't Kill Us All

Ferguson, Baltimore, and a New Era in America's Racial Justice Movement

Author: Wesley Lowery

Publisher: Little, Brown

ISBN: 0316312509

Category: Political Science

Page: 256

View: 7809

LA Times winner for The Christopher Isherwood Prize for Autobiographical Prose A New York Times bestseller A New York Times Editors' Choice A Featured Title in The New York Times Book Review's "Paperback Row" A Bustle "17 Books About Race Every White Person Should Read" "Essential reading."--Junot Diaz "Electric...so well reported, so plainly told and so evidently the work of a man who has not grown a callus on his heart."--Dwight Garner, New York Times, "A Top Ten Book of 2016" "I'd recommend everyone to read this book because it's not just statistics, it's not just the information, but it's the connective tissue that shows the human story behind it." -- Trevor Noah, The Daily Show A deeply reported book that brings alive the quest for justice in the deaths of Michael Brown, Tamir Rice, and Freddie Gray, offering both unparalleled insight into the reality of police violence in America and an intimate, moving portrait of those working to end it Conducting hundreds of interviews during the course of over one year reporting on the ground, Washington Post writer Wesley Lowery traveled from Ferguson, Missouri, to Cleveland, Ohio; Charleston, South Carolina; and Baltimore, Maryland; and then back to Ferguson to uncover life inside the most heavily policed, if otherwise neglected, corners of America today. In an effort to grasp the magnitude of the repose to Michael Brown's death and understand the scale of the problem police violence represents, Lowery speaks to Brown's family and the families of other victims other victims' families as well as local activists. By posing the question, "What does the loss of any one life mean to the rest of the nation?" Lowery examines the cumulative effect of decades of racially biased policing in segregated neighborhoods with failing schools, crumbling infrastructure and too few jobs. Studded with moments of joy, and tragedy, They Can't Kill Us All offers a historically informed look at the standoff between the police and those they are sworn to protect, showing that civil unrest is just one tool of resistance in the broader struggle for justice. As Lowery brings vividly to life, the protests against police killings are also about the black community's long history on the receiving end of perceived and actual acts of injustice and discrimination. They Can't Kill Us All grapples with a persistent if also largely unexamined aspect of the otherwise transformative presidency of Barack Obama: the failure to deliver tangible security and opportunity to those Americans most in need of both.
Posted in Political Science

Arc of Justice

A Saga of Race, Civil Rights, and Murder in the Jazz Age

Author: Kevin Boyle

Publisher: Henry Holt and Company

ISBN: 9781429900164

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 2062

An electrifying story of the sensational murder trial that divided a city and ignited the civil rights struggle In 1925, Detroit was a smoky swirl of jazz and speakeasies, assembly lines and fistfights. The advent of automobiles had brought workers from around the globe to compete for manufacturing jobs, and tensions often flared with the KKK in ascendance and violence rising. Ossian Sweet, a proud Negro doctor-grandson of a slave-had made the long climb from the ghetto to a home of his own in a previously all-white neighborhood. Yet just after his arrival, a mob gathered outside his house; suddenly, shots rang out: Sweet, or one of his defenders, had accidentally killed one of the whites threatening their lives and homes. And so it began-a chain of events that brought America's greatest attorney, Clarence Darrow, into the fray and transformed Sweet into a controversial symbol of equality. Historian Kevin Boyle weaves the police investigation and courtroom drama of Sweet's murder trial into an unforgettable tapestry of narrative history that documents the volatile America of the 1920s and movingly re-creates the Sweet family's journey from slavery through the Great Migration to the middle class. Ossian Sweet's story, so richly and poignantly captured here, is an epic tale of one man trapped by the battles of his era's changing times. Arc of Justice is the winner of the 2004 National Book Award for Nonfiction.
Posted in History

Arresting Citizenship

The Democratic Consequences of American Crime Control

Author: Amy E. Lerman,Vesla M. Weaver

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022613797X

Category: Political Science

Page: 312

View: 3855

The numbers are staggering: One-third of America’s adult population has passed through the criminal justice system and now has a criminal record. Many more were never convicted, but are nonetheless subject to surveillance by the state. Never before has the American government maintained so vast a network of institutions dedicated solely to the control and confinement of its citizens. A provocative assessment of the contemporary carceral state for American democracy, Arresting Citizenship argues that the broad reach of the criminal justice system has fundamentally recast the relation between citizen and state, resulting in a sizable—and growing—group of second-class citizens. From police stops to court cases and incarceration, at each stage of the criminal justice system individuals belonging to this disempowered group come to experience a state-within-a-state that reflects few of the country’s core democratic values. Through scores of interviews, along with analyses of survey data, Amy E. Lerman and Vesla M. Weaver show how this contact with police, courts, and prisons decreases faith in the capacity of American political institutions to respond to citizens’ concerns and diminishes the sense of full and equal citizenship—even for those who have not been found guilty of any crime. The effects of this increasingly frequent contact with the criminal justice system are wide-ranging—and pernicious—and Lerman and Weaver go on to offer concrete proposals for reforms to reincorporate this large group of citizens as active participants in American civic and political life.
Posted in Political Science