An Anthropology of Lying

Information in the Doctor-Patient Relationship

Author: Sylvie Fainzang

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317182073

Category: Social Science

Page: 160

View: 6791

In the era of health democracy, where a patient’s right to be informed is not only widely advocated but also guaranteed by law, what is the real situation regarding patient information? Do patients receive the information that they request with regard to their diagnosis, prognosis or treatments? And what information do patients themselves give to their doctors? Drawing on observational research in hospitals and covering the exchanges between doctors and patients on the subject of cancer treatment and that of other pathologies, this book reveals that the practice of telling lies is widespread amongst parties on both sides of the medical relationship. With attention to the manner in which information of various types is withheld and the truth concealed on either side of the doctor-patient relationship, the author explores the boundaries between what is said and what is left unsaid, and between those who are given information and those who are lied to. Considering the misunderstandings that occur in the course of medical exchanges and the differences between the lies told by doctors and patients, An Anthropology of Lying: Information in the Doctor-Patient Relationship analyses the role of mendacity in the exercise of, and resistance to power. A fascinating study of the mechanisms at work and social conditions surrounding the accomplishment of lying in medical settings, this book casts fresh light on a subject that has so far been overlooked. As such, it will appeal not only to sociologists and anthropologists of health and medicine, but also to medical professionals.
Posted in Social Science

Diagnostic Fluidity

Working with Uncertainty and Mutability

Author: Mette Bech Risør,Nina Nissen

Publisher: PUBLICACIONS UNIVERSITAT ROVIRA I VIRGILI

ISBN: 8484246655

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 9548

Diagnostic procedures are emblematic of medical work. Scholars in the field of social studies of medicine identify diverse dimensions of diagnosis that point to controversies, processual qualities and contested evidence. In this anthology, diagnostic fluidity is seen to permeate diagnostic work in a wide range of contexts, from medical interactions in the clinic, domestic settings and other relations of affective work, to organizational structures, and in historical developments. The contributors demonstrate, each in their own way, how different agents ‘do diagnosis’, highlighting the multi-faceted elements of uncertainty and mutability integral to diagnostic work. At the same time, the contributors also show how in ‘doing diagnosis’ enactments of subjectivities, representations of cultural imaginaries, bodily processes, and socio-cultural changes contribute to configuring diagnostic fluidity in significant ways.
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Self-Medication and Society

Mirages of Autonomy

Author: Sylvie Fainzang

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1315447150

Category: Social Science

Page: 136

View: 6851

The question of recourse to self-medication arises at the intersection of two partly antagonistic discourses: that of the public authorities, who advocate the practice primarily for economic reasons, and that of health professionals, who condemn it for fear that it may pose a danger to health and dispossess the profession of expertise. This books examines the reality of self-medication in context and investigates the social treatment of the notion of autonomy ever present in the discourses promoting this practice. Drawing on fieldwork conducted in France, the author examines the material, cognitive, symbolic and social dimensions of the recourse to self-medication, considering the motivations and practices of the subjects and what these reveal about their relationship with the medical institution, while addressing the question of open access to medicines – a subject of heated debate between the actors concerned on themes such as competence, knowledge and responsibility. A rigorous analysis of the strategies adopted by individuals to manage the risks of medicines and increase their efficacy, Self-Medication and Society will appeal to sociologists and anthropologists with interests in health, illness, the body and medicine.
Posted in Social Science

The Anthropology of Health

Author: Eleanor Bauwens

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Aging

Page: 218

View: 5778

Posted in Aging

Respecting Patient Autonomy

Author: Benjamin Horowitz Levi

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 9780252067495

Category: Medical

Page: 222

View: 7230

Against a backdrop of real clinical situations, Benjamin H. Levi examines the dynamics that shape relations between patient and health care provider, addressing fundamental questions about how medical decisions should be reached and compelling the reader to think about health care issues and decisions in terms of the values and goals they promote. Presenting bioethics as a practical, educational activity rather than an abstract intellectual exercise, this important volume shows how dialogue between patients and health care providers can clarify both medical and ethical issues, promoting patient autonomy and advancing health care.
Posted in Medical

Drug Dealer, MD

How Doctors Were Duped, Patients Got Hooked, and Why It’s So Hard to Stop

Author: Anna Lembke

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 1421421402

Category: Medical

Page: 192

View: 7035

Three out of four people addicted to heroin probably started on a prescription opioid, according to the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In the United States alone, 16,000 people die each year as a result of prescription opioid overdose. But perhaps the most frightening aspect of the prescription drug epidemic is that it’s built on well-meaning doctors treating patients with real problems. In Drug Dealer, MD, Dr. Anna Lembke uncovers the unseen forces driving opioid addiction nationwide. Combining case studies from her own practice with vital statistics drawn from public policy, cultural anthropology, and neuroscience, she explores the complex relationship between doctors and patients, the science of addiction, and the barriers to successfully addressing drug dependence and addiction. Even when addiction is recognized by doctors and their patients, she argues, many doctors don’t know how to treat it, connections to treatment are lacking, and insurance companies won’t pay for rehab. Full of extensive interviews—with health care providers, pharmacists, social workers, hospital administrators, insurance company executives, journalists, economists, advocates, and patients and their families— Drug Dealer, MD, is for anyone whose life has been touched in some way by addiction to prescription drugs. Dr. Lembke gives voice to the millions of Americans struggling with prescription drugs while singling out the real culprits behind the rise in opioid addiction: cultural narratives that promote pills as quick fixes, pharmaceutical corporations in cahoots with organized medicine, and a new medical bureaucracy focused on the bottom line that favors pills, procedures, and patient satisfaction over wellness. Dr. Lembke concludes that the prescription drug epidemic is a symptom of a faltering health care system, the solution for which lies in rethinking how health care is delivered.
Posted in Medical

Diagnosis Narratives and the Healing Ritual in Western Medicine

Author: James Peter Meza

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351804987

Category: Social Science

Page: 258

View: 5351

The dominance of "illness narratives" in narrative healing studies has tended to mean that the focus centers around the healing of the individual. Meza proposes that this emphasis is misplaced and the true focus of cultural healing should lie in managing the disruption of disease and death (cultural or biological) to the individual’s relationship with society. By explicating narrative theory through the lens of cognitive anthropology, Meza reframes the epistemology of narrative and healing, moving it from relativism to a philosophical perspective of pragmatic realism. Using a novel combination of narrative theory and cognitive anthropology to represent the ethnographic data, Meza’s ethnography is a valuable contribution in a field where ethnographic records related to medical clinical encounters are scarce. The book will be of interest to scholars of medical anthropology and those interested in narrative history and narrative medicine.
Posted in Social Science

An Anthropology of Money

A Critical Introduction

Author: Senior Instructor of History and Faculty Principal of the Carolina International House Tim Di Muzio,Tim Di Muzio,Distinguished Teaching Professor in Anthropology Richard H Robbins,Richard H. Robbins

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1315453444

Category: Social Science

Page: 150

View: 3038

An Anthropology of Money: A Critical Introduction shows how our present monetary system was imposed by elites and how they benefit from it. The book poses the question: how, by looking at different forms of money, can we appreciate that they have different effects? The authors demonstrate how modern money requires perpetual growth, an increase in inequality, environmental devastation, increasing commoditization, and, consequently, the perpetual consumption of ever more stuff. These are not intrinsic features of money, but, rather, of debt-money. This text shows that, through studying money in other cultures, we can have money that better serves the broader goals of society.
Posted in Social Science

An Anthropologist on Mars

Seven Paradoxical Tales

Author: Oliver Sacks

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0345805887

Category: Psychology

Page: 336

View: 2503

To these seven narratives of neurological disorder Dr. Sacks brings the same humanity, poetic observation, and infectious sense of wonder that are apparent in his bestsellers Awakenings and The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat. These men, women, and one extraordinary child emerge as brilliantly adaptive personalities, whose conditions have not so much debilitated them as ushered them into another reality.
Posted in Psychology

The Social Transformation of American Medicine

The Rise Of A Sovereign Profession And The Making Of A Vast Industry

Author: Paul Starr

Publisher: Basic Books

ISBN: 0786725451

Category: Medical

Page: 352

View: 9429

Winner of the 1983 Pulitzer Prize and the Bancroft Prize in American History, this is a landmark history of how the entire American health care system of doctors, hospitals, health plans, and government programs has evolved over the last two centuries. "The definitive social history of the medical profession in America....A monumental achievement."—H. Jack Geiger, M.D., New York Times Book Review
Posted in Medical

The Changing Face of Medicine

Women Doctors and the Evolution of Health Care in America

Author: Ann K. Boulis,Jerry A. Jacobs

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9780801476624

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 266

View: 921

The number of women practicing medicine in the United States has grown steadily since the late 1960s, with women now roughly at parity with men among entering medical students. Why did so many women enter American medicine? How are women faring, professionally and personally, once they become physicians? Are women transforming the way medicine is practiced? To answer these questions, The Changing Face of Medicine draws on a wide array of sources, including interviews with women physicians and surveys of medical students and practitioners. The analysis is set in the twin contexts of a rapidly evolving medical system and profound shifts in gender roles in American society. Throughout the book, Ann K. Boulis and Jerry A. Jacobs critically examine common assumptions about women in medicine. For example, they find that women's entry into medicine has less to do with the decline in status of the profession and more to do with changes in women's roles in contemporary society. Women physicians' families are becoming more and more like those of other working women. Still, disparities in terms of specialty, practice ownership, academic rank, and leadership roles endure, and barriers to opportunity persist. Along the way, Boulis and Jacobs address a host of issues, among them dual-physician marriages, specialty choice, time spent with patients, altruism versus materialism, and how physicians combine work and family. Women's presence in American medicine will continue to grow beyond the 50 percent mark, but the authors question whether this change by itself will make American medicine more caring and more patient centered. The future direction of the profession will depend on whether women doctors will lead the effort to chart a new course for health care delivery in the United States.
Posted in Health & Fitness

Argonauts of the Western Pacific

Author: Bronislaw Malinowski

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317677536

Category: Social Science

Page: 562

View: 8583

Bronislaw Malinowski’s pathbreaking Argonauts of the Western Pacific is at once a detailed account of exchange in the Melanesian islands and a manifesto of a modernist anthropology. Malinowski argued that the goal of which the ethnographer should never lose sight is ‘to grasp the native’s point of view, his relation to life, to realise his vision of his world.’ Through vivid evocations of Kula life, including the building and launching of canoes, fishing expeditions and the role of myth and magic amongst the Kula people, Malinowski brilliantly describes an inter-island system of exchange - from gifts from father to son to swapping fish for yams - around which an entire community revolves. A classic of anthropology that did much to establish the primacy of painstaking fieldwork over the earlier anecdotal reports of travel writers, journalists and missionaries, it is a compelling insight into a world now largely lost from view. With a new foreword by Adam Kuper.
Posted in Social Science

An Anthropology of Biomedicine

Author: Margaret Lock,Vinh-Kim Nguyen

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1119069130

Category: Medical

Page: 560

View: 4122

"Edition History: Margaret Lock and Vinh-Kim Nguyen (1e, 2010) published by Blackwell Ltd."--T.p. verso.
Posted in Medical

Bad Pharma

How Drug Companies Mislead Doctors and Harm Patients

Author: Ben Goldacre

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 0865478066

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 480

View: 8975

Argues that doctors are deliberately misinformed by profit-seeking pharmaceutical companies that casually withhold information about drug efficacy and side effects, explaining the process of pharmaceutical data manipulation and its global consequences. By the best-selling author of Bad Science.
Posted in Business & Economics

Physicianship and the Rebirth of Medical Education

Author: J. Donald Boudreau,Eric Cassell,Abraham Fuks

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199370818

Category: Medical

Page: 400

View: 744

The renewal of medical curricula generally arises from emerging pedagogies (e.g. problem-based learning), new technologies (e.g. high fidelity simulation), or prevailing sociocultural forces (e.g. complexity of health care delivery and team-based care). Approximately 15 years ago, a team of physicians and administrators sought to take this further: by considering the very nature of medical practice and the patient-physician relationship that is the context and conduit of caring and care, they restructured the composition and function of medical education. This book, Physicianship and the Rebirth of Medical Education, is the authoritative publication on the philosophy, design, and implementation of this new curriculum. From first year to graduation, this book reimagines the education of medical students in its entire scope. It discusses the epistemology of clinical practice and pedagogical methods and addresses pragmatic issues of curricular implementation. The educational blueprint presented in the book rests on a new definition of sickness, one focused on impairments of function as the primary issue of concern for both patients and their care givers. This perspective avoids the common shift of medical attention from persons to diseases, and thus provides the basis for an authentic and robust patient-centered mindset. The title of the book refers to a "rebirth." This implies that there was a previous "birth." Indeed, the critical ingredients of medical education were articulated historically and many features emanate from a time-honored apprenticeship model. This book recognizes in William Osler and his "natural method of teaching the subject of medicine" the foundational elements for teaching physicianship. The practice of medicine is indelibly relational and, in turn, medical education is an intellectual and an emotional journey that is rooted in clinical relationships. As this book shows, medicine must unfold in the context of patient care; patients, not diseases, should be the center of attention.
Posted in Medical

Writing about Patients

Responsibilities, Risks, and Ramifications

Author: Judy Leopold Kantrowitz

Publisher: Other PressLlc

ISBN: 9781590511442

Category: Psychology

Page: 335

View: 3205

An important new study of the clinical conundrum surrounding the publication of patient material. The publication, presentation, and discussion of case studies are essential to the dialogue of psychoanalysis. However, presenting patient material to the public by either disguising the patient's identity or asking for the patient's consent presents a clinical dilemma. In a series of interviews, Judy Leopold Kantrowitz asks 141 analysts not only to describe their thoughts about disguising a patient versus asking a patient's consent to appear in a paper, but also their perceptions of the clinical ramifications of a patient reading the material, whether by accident or design. In first-hand accounts, both analysts-as-patients and patients who are not themselves analysts relate the experience of reading about themselves, and reflect on the impact that reading had on their view of their analysts, themselves, and the analytic work. Ethical concerns about confidentiality and decision making are examined both in theory and in the context of their clinical effect. Throughout the book, Kantrowitz examines the conscious and unconscious motives for analysts in writing about a patient, ultimately demonstrating that the conflict between the need to preserve patient privacy and the need for a literature including clinical material is not easily resolved.
Posted in Psychology

DSM-5® Handbook on the Cultural Formulation Interview

Author: Roberto Lewis-Fernández,Neil Krishan Aggarwal,Ladson Hinton,Devon E. Hinton,Laurence J. Kirmayer

Publisher: American Psychiatric Pub

ISBN: 1615370242

Category: Medical

Page: 364

View: 3232

DSM-5® Handbook of the Cultural Formulation Interview provides the background, context, and detailed guidance necessary to train clinicians in the use of the Cultural Formulation Interview (CFI), which was created as part of the 2007-2013 DSM revision process. The purpose of the CFI -- and this unique handbook -- is to make it easier for providers to account for the influence of culture in their clinical work to enhance patient-clinician communication and improve outcomes. Cultural psychiatry as a field has evolved enormously from the days when it was principally concerned with epidemiological and clinical studies of disease prevalence; it now examines a multitude of issues, primary among them the differing patient, family, and practitioner models of illness and treatment experiences within and across cultures. The editors, all of whom have been intimately involved in the evolution of the field, have designed the book and accompanying videos for maximum instructional and clinical utility. The Handbook boasts many strengths and useful features, including: A detailed description of each of the three CFI components: a core 16-item questionnaire, which can be applied in any clinical setting with any patient by any mental health clinician; an informant version of the core CFI used to obtain information from caregivers; and 12 supplementary modules that expand on these basic assessments. This material facilitates implementation of the CFI by clinicians. Over a dozen clinical vignettes are included to illustrate use of the three components, and the Handbook also includes multiple videos that demonstrate the application of portions of the core CFI, and several supplementary modules. Strategies for incorporating the CFI into clinical training are identified and discussed, furthering the objective of developing culturally-sensitive and astute practitioners. The theoretical bases of the CFI are explored, raising questions for discussion and identifying areas for further research. The CFI is a valuable tool for all patients, not just those judged to be culturally different. The CFI has been called the single most practically useful contribution of cultural psychiatry and medical anthropology to clinical psychiatry, primary care, and medicine in general. DSM-5® Handbook on the Cultural Formulation Interview is the only book on the market that equips readers with the skills and insight to incorporate the CFI into practice, making it a critically important addition to the clinical literature.
Posted in Medical

Digital Healing

People, Information, Healthcare

Author: Marc Ringel

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1351631551

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 262

View: 4846

Medical practice and research are inconceivable today without electronic computing and communication tools. Digital machines do many tasks orders-of-magnitude better, faster and more accurately than humans. Still, there are functions critical to the healthcare endeavor that people do much better than machines, things like: understanding and using natural language; perceiving what is unexpressed; taking into account values, culture, ethics, and human relationships; touching and healing. For the foreseeable future, the "smartest" computers will be no match for human beings when it comes to performing these most anthropic functions. American healthcare is at a critical juncture. Providers and patients are increasingly frustrated by degradation of the human relationships that lie at the core of the medical practice. Technologies, such as the computerized medical record, get much of the blame for intrusion into the patient-provider relationship. However, it is not technology itself that is to blame. The fault lies with how systems are conceived, designed, and deployed. This book analyzes how to organize the work of healthcare in a way that uses machines to do what they do best, thereby freeing humans to do what we do best. Smart use of electronic technology is crucial to the success of any bid to fulfill the Institute for Healthcare Improvement’s triple aim to make healthcare more effective, efficient, and humane.
Posted in Business & Economics

Facing Distress

Distance and Proximity in Times of Illness

Author: Els van Dongen,Ruth Kutalek

Publisher: LIT Verlag Münster

ISBN: 9783825801717

Category: Medical

Page: 155

View: 2696

Distance and proximity are concepts par excellence to describe what may happen in times of illness and suffering. When one faces distress and suffering the need of proximity of the sick or suffering person may manifest itself, or the opposite, a need of distance exists. A doctor or an anthropologist may believe proximity is necessary, but the other can disagree. Illness raises questions for all individuals. The sick individual will question his or her relationship with others and being in the world. The authors of this volume take up issues of distance and proximity in illness and suffering in various situations. Els van Dongen is assistant professor of medical anthropology at the University of Amsterdam (the Netherlands). Ruth Kutalek is medical anthropologist at the Department of Ethnomedicine of the Institute for the History of Medicine, Vienna (Austria).
Posted in Medical

The Man Who Mistook His Wife For A Hat: And Other Clinical Tales

Author: Oliver Sacks

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 0684853949

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 243

View: 4301

Presents a series of stories about men and women who, representing both medical and literary oddities, raise fundamental questions about the nature of reality
Posted in Biography & Autobiography