American Generalship

Character Is Everything: The Art of Command

Author: Edgar Puryear

Publisher: Presidio Press

ISBN: 0307574385

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 3668

America's top military leaders are scrutinized as Puryear ponders what prepared our generals for the terrible responsibilities they bore during World War II, Korea, Vietnam, the Gulf War and on to today.
Posted in History

American Generalship

Character is Everything : the Art of Command

Author: Edgar F. Puryear

Publisher: Presidio Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 374

View: 4232

Explores what it takes to become a successful and effective high-level leader in America's armed forces, drawing on interviews with more than one hundred generals and admirals.
Posted in Technology & Engineering

American Generalship

Character Is Everything, the Art of Command

Author: Edgar F. Puryear

Publisher: Presidio Press

ISBN: 0891417702

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 3152

America's top military leaders are scrutinized as Puryear ponders what prepared our generals for the terrible responsibilities they bore during World War II, Korea, Vietnam, the Gulf War and on to today.
Posted in History

Nineteen Stars

A Study in Military Character and Leadership

Author: Edgar F. Puryear

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 437

View: 6375

Puryear follows MacArthur, Marshall, Eisenhower and Patton through the years of their military service in both peace and war.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

John M. Schofield and the Politics of Generalship

Author: Donald B. Connelly

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807877081

Category: History

Page: 488

View: 8909

In the first full biography of Lieutenant General John McAllister Schofield (1831-1906), Donald B. Connelly examines the career of one of the leading commanders in the western theater during the Civil War. In doing so, Connelly illuminates the role of politics in the formulation of military policy, during both war and peace, in the latter half of the nineteenth century. Connelly relates how Schofield, as a department commander during the war, had to cope with contending political factions that sought to shape military and civil policies. Following the war, Schofield occupied every senior position in the army--including secretary of war and commanding general of the army--and became a leading champion of army reform and professionalism. He was the first senior officer to recognize that professionalism would come not from the separation of politics and the military but from the army's accommodation of politics and the often contentious American constitutional system. Seen through the lens of Schofield's extensive military career, the history of American civil-military relations has seldom involved conflict between the military and civil authority, Connelly argues. The central question has never been whether to have civilian control but rather which civilians have a say in the formulation and execution of policy.
Posted in History

Beyond Wealth

The Road Map to a Rich Life

Author: Alexander Green

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1118078349

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 288

View: 3434

It's not all about the money; the key to true riches Leo Tolstoy said, "Nobody knows where the human race is going. The highest wisdom, then, is to know where you are going." Yet many today chase the false rabbits of success: status, luxury, reputation and material possessions. In the quest to "have it all," our lives often lack real meaning and purpose. Beyond Wealth is the antidote. New York Times bestselling author Alexander Green takes things right down to brass tacks: We are here for a short time. Knowledge is limitless. Therefore, the most critical knowledge is not any particular skill but rather wisdom about "how to live." Fortunately, men and women have had several thousand years to think about what it means to live "the good life." And the answers found here, from Plato and Aristotle to Mahatma Gandhi and Stephen Hawking, will both surprise and delight you. Beyond Wealth provides insightful commentary on the most important aspects of our lives: love, work, honor, trust, freedom, death, fear, truth, beauty and other timeless issues. The book is both a thought provoking read and the ideal gift, guaranteed to ennoble, uplift and inspire.
Posted in Business & Economics

Grant and Lee

A Study in Personality and Generalship [Second Edition]

Author: Maj.-Gen J. F. C. Fuller

Publisher: Pickle Partners Publishing

ISBN: 1789121221

Category: History

Page: 239

View: 7125

First published in 1957, this second edition of the analysis of the generalship of Ulysses S. Grant and Robert E. Lee remains one of the most readable histories of the Civil War. The author began his research sharing the generally held assumption that Lee was a great general and Grant a clumsy “butcher.” By the time Fuller completed his project, however, he regarded Grant as the greatest general of his age and one of the greatest strategists of any age. Grant and Lee is a compelling study not only of two remarkable men but also of the nature of leadership and command in wartime. “...cuts squarely across the accepted tradition...[Fuller] examines these two great soldiers from a fresh viewpoint and refuses to let himself be bound by tradition.”—Bruce Catton, New York Times Book Review “...a stimulating study which appreciates both the unique personalities of the protagonists and the social conditions which stamped their tactics.”—Commonweal “Fuller’s...analysis and comparison of the personality, leadership, and generalship of Grant and Lee is as readable, instructive, stimulating, and...controversial as when first published.”—Military Review
Posted in History

The Art of Command

Military Leadership from George Washington to Colin Powell

Author: Harry Laver

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 0813173124

Category: History

Page: 294

View: 3388

What essential leadership lessons do we learn by distilling the actions and ideas of great military commanders such as George Washington, Dwight D. Eisenhower, and Colin Powell? That is the fundamental question underlying The Art of Command: Military Leadership from George Washington to Colin Powell. The book illustrates that great leaders become great through conscious effort—a commitment not only to develop vital skills but also to surmount personal shortcomings. Harry S. Laver, Jeffrey J. Matthews, and the other contributing authors identify nine core characteristics of highly effective leadership, such as integrity, determination, vision, and charisma, and nine significant figures in American military history whose careers embody those qualities. The Art of Command examines each figure’s strengths and weaknesses and how those attributes affected their leadership abilities, offering a unique perspective of military leadership in American history. Laver and Matthews have assembled a list of contributors from military, academic, and professional circles, which allows the book to encompass diverse approaches to the study of leadership.
Posted in History

A General who Will Fight

The Leadership of Ulysses S. Grant

Author: Harry S. Laver

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 0813136776

Category: History

Page: 195

View: 9583

Prior to his service in the Civil War, Ulysses S. Grant exhibited few characteristics indicating that he would be an extraordinary leader. His performance as a cadet was mediocre, and he finished in the bottom half of his class at West Point. However, during his early service in the Civil War, most notably at the battles of Shiloh and Vicksburg, Grant proved that he possessed an uncommon drive. When it was most crucial, Grant demonstrated his integrity, determination, and tactical skill by taking control of the Union troops and leading his forces to victory. A General Who Will Fight is a detailed study of leadership that explores Grant's rise from undisciplined cadet to commanding general of the United States Army. Some experts have attributed Grant's success to superior manpower and technology, to the help he received from other Union armies, or even to a ruthless willingness to sacrifice his own men. Harry S. Laver, however, refutes these arguments and reveals that the only viable explanation for Grant's success lies in his leadership skill, professional competence, and unshakable resolve. Much more than a book on military strat-egy, this innovative volume examines the decision-making process that enabled Grant both to excel as an unquestioned commander and to win.
Posted in History

Supreme Command

Soldiers, Statesmen and Leadership in Wartime

Author: Eliot A. Cohen

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 074324222X

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 3457

The relationship between military leaders and political leaders has always been a complicated one, especially in times of war. When the chips are down, who should run the show -- the politicians or the generals? In Supreme Command, Eliot Cohen examines four great democratic war statesmen -- Abraham Lincoln, Georges Clemenceau, Winston Churchill, and David Ben-Gurion -- to reveal the surprising answer: the politicians. Great states-men do not turn their wars over to their generals, and then stay out of their way. Great statesmen make better generals of their generals. They question and drive their military men, and at key times they overrule their advice. The generals may think they know how to win, but the statesmen are the ones who see the big picture. Lincoln, Clemenceau, Churchill, and Ben-Gurion led four very different kinds of democracy, under the most difficult circumstances imaginable. They came from four very different backgrounds -- backwoods lawyer, dueling French doctor, rogue aristocrat, and impoverished Jewish socialist.Yet they faced similar challenges, not least the possibility that their conduct of the war could bring about their fall from power. Each exhibited mastery of detail and fascination with technology. All four were great learners, who studied war as if it were their own profession, and in many ways mastered it as well as did their generals. All found themselves locked in conflict with military men. All four triumphed. Military men often dismiss politicians as meddlers, doves, or naifs. Yet military men make mistakes. The art of a great leader is to push his subordinates to achieve great things. The lessons of the book apply not just to President Bush and other world leaders in the war on terrorism, but to anyone who faces extreme adversity at the head of a free organization -- including leaders and managers throughout the corporate world. The lessons of Supreme Command will be immediately apparent to all managers and leaders, as well as students of history.
Posted in History

The Classical Art of Command

Eight Greek Generals Who Shaped the History of Warfare

Author: Joseph Roisman

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199985820

Category: Command of troops

Page: 416

View: 9380

The Classical Age of Greece produced some of history's best-known generals and commanders. They include the Spartan king Leonidas, who embodied his countrymen's heroic ethos in the battle of Thermopylae; the Athenian leader Themistocles, credited as the architect of Athens' naval power and of the Greek victory over the Persians; the famous democratic leader, Pericles, who prepared Athens and directed its conflict with Sparta, known as the Peloponnesian War; the Athenian general Demosthenes, who deviated from contemporary conventions of warfare with his innovative approach; the Spartan general Lysander, who won the Peloponnesian War for Sparta; Dionysius I of Syracuse, arguably the most innovative and best skilled of the eight generals discussed in this book; and Epaminondas and Pelopidas who together transformed their city, Thebes, into an hegemonic power. The Classical Art of Command gives readers a unique opportunity to examine the variegated nature of Greek generalship through the individual careers of eight prominent commanders. It describes the attributes of these leaders' command, the many facets of their individual careers and stratagems, and the mark they left on Greek history and warfare. It draws attention to the important role that personality played in their leadership. Joseph Roisman investigates how these generals designed and executed military campaigns and strategy, and to what degree they were responsible for the results. The volume also looks at how the Greek art of command changed during the Classical Age, and how adaptable it was to different military challenges. Other questions involve the extent to which a general was a mere leader of the charge, a battle director, or a strategist, and what made both ancient and modern authorities regard these eight generals as outstanding shapers of military history. Filled with original analyses and accessible accounts of legendary battles, The Classical Art of Command will appeal to all readers with an interest in ancient warfare and generalship.
Posted in Command of troops

The Art of War

A New Translation

Author: Sun Tzu

Publisher: Amber Books Ltd

ISBN: 1909160199

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 96

View: 4200

Written in the 6th century BC, Sun Tzu’s The Art of War is still used as a book of military strategy today. Napoleon, Mae Zedong, General Vo Nguyen Giap and General Douglas MacArthur all claimed to have drawn inspiration from it. And beyond the world of war, business and management gurus have also applied Sun Tzu’s ideas to office politics and corporate strategy. Using a new translation by James Trapp and including editorial notes, this edition of The Art of War lays the original Chinese text opposite the modern English translation. The book contains the full original 13 chapters on such topics as laying plans, attacking by stratagem, weaponry, terrain and the use of spies. Sun Tzu addresses different campaign situations, marching, energy and how to exploit your enemy’s weaknesses. Of immense influence to great leaders across millennia, The Art of War is a classic text richly deserving this exquisite edition.
Posted in Business & Economics

British Generals in Blair's Wars

Author: Mr Richard Iron

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN: 1472401573

Category: History

Page: 404

View: 464

This is a truly unique and invaluable book. For the first time, we are offered first-hand testimony about Britain's involvement in recent campaigns by senior participants. In addition to touching on themes like civilian-military relations, the operational direction of war and relationships with allies, these eyewitness accounts give a real sense of how the character of a war changes even as it is being fought. It will be essential reading for those in military academies and staff colleges, not only in Britain but throughout NATO, and especially in the USA. It also has profound policy implications, as both the UK and NATO more generally reassess their strategies and the value of intervention operations. It will also become a primary source for historians and students of the wars, in Iraq and Afghanistan in particular.
Posted in History

Controversies and Commanders

Dispatches from the Army of the Potomac

Author: Stephen W. Sears

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 9780618057061

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 9921

A renowned historian weaves an intricate and fascinating tapestry of the people and events that influenced the Civil War, from Professor Lowe's reconnaissance balloons to the looting of Fredricksburg to the infamous General Dan Sickels who shot his wife's lover outside the White House. Reprint.
Posted in History

Genghis Khan

Conqueror of the World

Author: Leo de Hartog

Publisher: Tauris Parke Paperbacks

ISBN: 9781860649721

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 8617

Analyzes how Genghis Khan was able to unite the primitive Mongol tribes of the Siberian steppes and organize them into a disciplined army that eventually conquered areas of China, Afghanistan, Persia, and Southern Russia.
Posted in History

Why Air Forces Fail

The Anatomy of Defeat

Author: Robin Higham

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 0813171741

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 6825

According to Robin Higham and Stephen J. Harris, “Flight has been part of the human dream for aeons, and its military application has likely been the dark side of that dream for almost as long.” In the twentieth century, this dream and its dark side unfolded as the air forces of the world went to war, bringing destruction and reassessment with each failure. Why Air Forces Fail examines the complex, often deep-seated, reasons for the catastrophic failures of the air forces of various nations. Higham and Harris divide the air forces into three categories of defeat: forces that never had a chance to win, such as Poland and France; forces that started out victorious but were ultimately defeated, such as Germany and Japan; and finally, those that were defeated in their early efforts yet rose to victory, such as the air forces of Britain and the United States. The contributing authors examine the complex causes of defeats of the Russian, Polish, French, Arab, British, Italian, German, Argentine, and American air services. In all cases, the failures stemmed from deep, usually prewar factors that were shaped by the political, economic, military, and social circumstances in the countries. Defeat also stemmed from the anticipation of future wars, early wartime actions, and the precarious relationship between the doctrine of the military leadership and its execution in the field. Anthony Christopher Cain’s chapter on France’s air force, l’Armée de l’Air, attributes France’s loss to Germany in June 1940 to a lack of preparation and investment in the air force. One major problem was the failure to centralize planning or coordinate a strategy between land and air forces, which was compounded by aborted alliances between France and countries in eastern Europe, especially Poland and Czechoslovakia. In addition, the lack of incentives for design innovation in air technologies led to clashes between airplane manufacturers, laborers, and the government, a struggle that resulted in France’s airplanes’ being outnumbered by Germany’s more than three to one by 1940. Complemented by reading lists and suggestions for further research, Why Air Forces Fail provides groundbreaking studies of the causes of air force defeats.
Posted in History

Overlord

General Pete Quesada and the Triumph of Tactical A

Author: Thomas Alexander Hughes

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781439118535

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 5022

Over Lord is the fascinating story of how American tactical air power was developed by General Elwood "Pete" Quesada during World War II, including its decisive role in Operation OVERLORD and the liberation of Europe. Pete Quesada is one of World War II's unsung yet crucial heroes. With his famous "Ninth Tactical Air Command," Quesada established the best air-ground team in the European theater. he pioneered the use of radar in close air support operations, introducing weapons systems specifically geared to tactical operations. He nurtured new flying methods designed for the kind of precision bombing the battlefields of Europe demanded. And more than anything else, Pete Quesada championed efforts to model air and ground officers into a single fighting unit. His relationships with ground leaders like Generals Omar Bradley and "Lightning Joe" Collins were a model for the kind of interservice harmony that was essential for dislodging the entrenched German Army. At war's end everybody from General of the Army Dwight Eisenhower to ordinary infantrymen recognized Pete Quesada as the premier expert and dogged patron of close air support. Allied airplanes over the battlefields of Europe had undoubtedly shortened the war and saved many thousands of lives, and Pete Quesada came home to a hero's welcome in 1945. By then he was the personification of tactical air power. Indeed, he was its over lord. Unfortunately, Quesada's groundbreaking methods were all but forgotten after the war. As the Cold War deepened, Air Force leaders stressed the role of big bombers flying deep into enemy territory and renounced the importance of close air support missions. Quesada himself was shunted into jobs that were both illsuited to his fiery temperament and divorced from his wartime expertise in tactical aviation. Frustrated, he retired from the Air Force in 1951 at forty-seven years of age. Fortunately, the story of Quesada's innovative tactics did not end there for the American military. In Korea in the 1950s and Vietnam in the 1960s, U.S. servicemen struggled -- and died -- relearning and recreating the kinds of tactics that Quesada had made commonplace in 1944-45. Had the U.S. Air Force nurtured its capacity for close air support, those two conflicts may have unfolded differently. Since then, the Air Force has struggled for a better balance between its bombardment missions and its support functions. This is the definitive story of an extraordinary man, whose remarkable efforts to aid foot soldiers in World War II contributed significantly to the Allies' success. America's belated rediscovery of Quesada's precepts some forty years later in conflicts like Operation DESERT STORM only underscores the importance of Quesada's story.
Posted in History

General George Washington

A Military Life

Author: Edward G. Lengel

Publisher: Random House Incorporated

ISBN: 0812969502

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 450

View: 1716

A definitive military portrait of America's first president traces Washington's wartime experiences from the 1750s to the 1790s, assessing the characteristics, successes, and failures of George Washington as a military strategist, tactician, administrator, and leader of men and explaining how he unified and shaped the military forces that won the American Revolution. Reprint. 20,000 first printing.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

Maverick Military Leaders

The Extraordinary Battles of Washington, Nelson, Patton, Rommel, and Others

Author: Robert Harvey

Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing Company Incorporated

ISBN: 9781620876145

Category: History

Page: 434

View: 6969

Presents portraits of twelve generals and commanders who lived between the eighteenth and twentieth centuries and describes their unique leadership styles and personalities, including Robert E. Lee, Henri Gouraud, Douglas MacArthur, and Horatio Nelson.
Posted in History

The Generals of Shiloh

Character in Leadership, April 6-7, 1862

Author: Larry Tagg

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 1611213703

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 730

“Character is destiny” wrote Greek Philosopher Heraclitus more than twenty-five centuries ago. Douglas Southall Freeman, the Army of Northern Virginia’s preeminent historian, echoed that view when he wrote, “Further study . . . may prove both more profitable and more interesting when it deals with men and morale than where it merely described in new terms the familiar strategy and battles.” Better than any historian of his age, Freeman appreciated the impact character played on Gen. Robert E. Lee’s judgment and actions. Indeed, the foundation of his Pulitzer Prize-winning Lee biography is constructed around this theme. Most writers of military history stress strategy and tactics at the expense of the character of their subjects. Larry Tagg remedies that oversight with The Generals of Shiloh, a unique and invaluable study of the high-ranking combat officers whose conduct in April 1862 helped determine the success or failure of their respective armies, the fate of the war in the Western Theater and, in turn, the fate of the American union. Tagg’s new book, which is modeled after his bestselling The Generals of Gettysburg, presents detailed background information on each of his subjects, coupled with a thorough account of each man’s actions on the field of Shiloh and, if he survived that battle, his fate thereafter. Many of the great names tossed up by civil war are found here in this early battle, from U. S. Grant, William T. Sherman, and Don Carlos Buell, to Albert S. Johnston, Braxton Bragg, and P. G. T. Beauregard. Many more men, whose names crossed the stage of furious combat only to disappear in the smoke on the far side, also populate these pages. Every one acted in his own unique fashion and in a manner worthy of study. This marriage of character (“the features and attributes of a man”) with his war record, offers new insights into how and why a particular soldier acted a certain way, in a certain situation, at a certain time. Nineteenth century combat was an unforgiving cauldron. In that hot fire some grew timid and listless, others demonstrated a tendency toward rashness, and the balance rose to the occasion and did their duty as they understood it. Each of their stories are found within these pages. The Generals of Shiloh will be hailed as both a wonderful read and an outstanding reference work for the general student and scholar alike.
Posted in History