African American Slavery and Disability

Bodies, Property, and Power in the Antebellum South, 1800-1860

Author: Dea H. Boster

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 041553724X

Category: History

Page: 183

View: 7644

Disability is often mentioned in discussions of slave health, mistreatment and abuse, but constructs of how "able" and "disabled" bodies influenced the institution of slavery has gone largely overlooked. This volume uncovers a history of disability in African American slavery from the primary record, analyzing how concepts of race, disability, and power converged in the United States in the first half of the nineteenth century. Slaves with physical and mental impairments often faced unique limitations and conditions in their diagnosis, treatment, and evaluation as property. Slaves with disabilities proved a significant challenge to white authority figures, torn between the desire to categorize them as different or defective and the practical need to incorporate their "disorderly" bodies into daily life. Being physically "unfit" could sometimes allow slaves to escape the limitations of bondage and oppression, and establish a measure of self-control. Furthermore, ideas about and reactions to disability--appearing as social construction, legal definition, medical phenomenon, metaphor, or masquerade--highlighted deep struggles over bodies in bondage in antebellum America.
Posted in History

African American Slavery and Disability

Bodies, Property and Power in the Antebellum South, 1800-1860

Author: Dea H. Boster

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136275312

Category: Social Science

Page: 184

View: 5299

Disability is often mentioned in discussions of slave health, mistreatment and abuse, but constructs of how "able" and "disabled" bodies influenced the institution of slavery has gone largely overlooked. This volume uncovers a history of disability in African American slavery from the primary record, analyzing how concepts of race, disability, and power converged in the United States in the first half of the nineteenth century. Slaves with physical and mental impairments often faced unique limitations and conditions in their diagnosis, treatment, and evaluation as property. Slaves with disabilities proved a significant challenge to white authority figures, torn between the desire to categorize them as different or defective and the practical need to incorporate their "disorderly" bodies into daily life. Being physically "unfit" could sometimes allow slaves to escape the limitations of bondage and oppression, and establish a measure of self-control. Furthermore, ideas about and reactions to disability—appearing as social construction, legal definition, medical phenomenon, metaphor, or masquerade—highlighted deep struggles over bodies in bondage in antebellum America.
Posted in Social Science

Blackness and Disability

Critical Examinations and Cultural Interventions

Author: Christopher M. Bell

Publisher: LIT Verlag Münster

ISBN: 3643101260

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 165

View: 2947

Blackness and Disability makes a unique contribution to Disability Studies scholarship. Christopher Bell and the other contributors to this volume help fill a glaring gap in the literature by examining the intersection between race - specifically, blackness - and disability. This volume should be in the library of every Disability Studies scholar. (Series: FORECAAST - Vol. 21)
Posted in Literary Criticism

Generations of Captivity

A History of African-American Slaves

Author: Ira Berlin

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674020832

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 384

View: 9062

Ira Berlin traces the history of African-American slavery in the United States from its beginnings in the seventeenth century to its fiery demise nearly three hundred years later. Most Americans, black and white, have a singular vision of slavery, one fixed in the mid-nineteenth century when most American slaves grew cotton, resided in the deep South, and subscribed to Christianity. Here, however, Berlin offers a dynamic vision, a major reinterpretation in which slaves and their owners continually renegotiated the terms of captivity. Slavery was thus made and remade by successive generations of Africans and African Americans who lived through settlement and adaptation, plantation life, economic transformations, revolution, forced migration, war, and ultimately, emancipation. Berlin's understanding of the processes that continually transformed the lives of slaves makes "Generations of Captivity" essential reading for anyone interested in the evolution of antebellum America. Connecting the "Charter Generation" to the development of Atlantic society in the seventeenth century, the "Plantation Generation" to the reconstruction of colonial society in the eighteenth century, the "Revolutionary Generation" to the Age of Revolutions, and the "Migration Generation" to American expansionism in the nineteenth century, Berlin integrates the history of slavery into the larger story of American life. He demonstrates how enslaved black people, by adapting to changing circumstances, prepared for the moment when they could seize liberty and declare themselves the "Freedom Generation." This epic story, told by a master historian, provides a rich understanding of the experience of African-American slaves, an experience that continues to mobilize American thought and passions today.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

Africans in America

America's Journey Through Slavery

Author: Charles Johnson,Patricia Smith,WGBH Series Research Team

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 9780156008549

Category: History

Page: 494

View: 4200

Chronicles the lives of Africans as slaves in America through the eve of the Civil War
Posted in History

Black Jacks

African American Seamen in the Age of Sail

Author: W. Jeffrey. Bolster

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674028473

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 3970

Few Americans, black or white, recognize the degree to which early African American history is a maritime history. W. Jeffrey Bolster shatters the myth that black seafaring in the age of sail was limited to the Middle Passage. Seafaring was one of the most significant occupations among both enslaved and free black men between 1740 and 1865. Tens of thousands of black seamen sailed on lofty clippers and modest coasters. They sailed in whalers, warships, and privateers. Some were slaves, forced to work at sea, but by 1800 most were free men, seeking liberty and economic opportunity aboard ship. Bolster brings an intimate understanding of the sea to this extraordinary chapter in the formation of black America. Because of their unusual mobility, sailors were the eyes and ears to worlds beyond the limited horizon of black communities ashore. Sometimes helping to smuggle slaves to freedom, they were more often a unique conduit for news and information of concern to blacks. But for all its opportunities, life at sea was difficult. Blacks actively contributed to the Atlantic maritime culture shared by all seamen, but were often outsiders within it. Capturing that tension, "Black Jacks" examines not only how common experiences drew black and white sailors together--even as deeply internalized prejudices drove them apart--but also how the meaning of race aboard ship changed with time. Bolster traces the story to the end of the Civil War, when emancipated blacks began to be systematically excluded from maritime work. Rescuing African American seamen from obscurity, this stirring account reveals the critical role sailors played in helping forge new identities for black people in America. An epic tale of the rise and fall of black seafaring, "Black Jacks" is African Americans' freedom story presented from a fresh perspective.
Posted in History

A Disability History of the United States

Author: Kim E. Nielsen

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 0807022039

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 380

The first book to cover the entirety of disability history, from pre-1492 to the present Disability is not just the story of someone we love or the story of whom we may become; rather it is undoubtedly the story of our nation. Covering the entirety of US history from pre-1492 to the present, A Disability History of the United States is the first book to place the experiences of people with disabilities at the center of the American narrative. In many ways, it’s a familiar telling. In other ways, however, it is a radical repositioning of US history. By doing so, the book casts new light on familiar stories, such as slavery and immigration, while breaking ground about the ties between nativism and oralism in the late nineteenth century and the role of ableism in the development of democracy. A Disability History of the United States pulls from primary-source documents and social histories to retell American history through the eyes, words, and impressions of the people who lived it. As historian and disability scholar Nielsen argues, to understand disability history isn’t to narrowly focus on a series of individual triumphs but rather to examine mass movements and pivotal daily events through the lens of varied experiences. Throughout the book, Nielsen deftly illustrates how concepts of disability have deeply shaped the American experience—from deciding who was allowed to immigrate to establishing labor laws and justifying slavery and gender discrimination. Included are absorbing—at times horrific—narratives of blinded slaves being thrown overboard and women being involuntarily sterilized, as well as triumphant accounts of disabled miners organizing strikes and disability rights activists picketing Washington. Engrossing and profound, A Disability History of the United States fundamentally reinterprets how we view our nation’s past: from a stifling master narrative to a shared history that encompasses us all.
Posted in Social Science

A Brief History of Slavery

Author: Jeremy Black

Publisher: Robinson

ISBN: 1849017328

Category: Social Science

Page: 160

View: 9886

A thought-provoking and important book that raises essential issues crucial not only for our past but also the present day. In this panoramic history, Jeremy Black tells how slavery was first developed in the ancient world, and reaches all the way to present day and the contemporary crimes of trafficking and bonded labour. He shows how slavery has taken many forms throughout history and across the world - from the uprising of Spartacus, the plantations of the Indies, and the murderous forced labour of the gulags and concentration camps. Slavery helped consolidated transoceanic empires and helped mould new world societies such as America and Brazil. In the Atlantic trade, Black also looks at the controversial area of how complicit the African peoples were in the trade. He then charts the long fight for abolition in the 19th century, including both the campaigners as well as the lost voices of the slaves themselves who spoke of their misery. Finally, as Black points out, slavery has not been completely abolished today and coerced labour can be found closer to home than is comfortable.
Posted in Social Science

Dictionary of Afro-American Slavery

Author: Randall M. Miller,John David Smith

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780275957995

Category: History

Page: 892

View: 6332

The acclaimed guide to American slavery, now available to students as well as scholars.
Posted in History

Narrative of My Escape from Slavery

Author: Moses Roper

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 0486148688

Category: Social Science

Page: 64

View: 8250

This 1838 autobiography recounts the experiences of a North Carolina slave who was sold or traded until his escape to New England. Roper's moving reminiscences offer a powerful account of life in bondage.
Posted in Social Science

The Burden

African Americans and the Enduring Impact of Slavery

Author: Rochelle Riley

Publisher: Wayne State University Press

ISBN: 0814345158

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 200

View: 8819

Examines the continued emotional, economic, and cultural enslavement of African Americans in the twenty-first century.
Posted in Literary Collections

Exodus and Emancipation

Biblical and African-American Slavery

Author: Kenneth Chelst

Publisher: Urim Publications

ISBN: 9655240851

Category: Religion

Page: 446

View: 5355

Presenting a new perspective on the saga of the enslavement of the Jewish people and their departure from Egypt, this study compares the Jewish experience with that of African-American slaves in the United States, as well as the latter group’s subsequent fight for dignity and equality. This consideration dives deeply into the biblical narrative, using classical and modern commentaries to explore the social, psychological, religious, and philosophical dimensions of the slave experience and mentality. It draws on slave narratives, published letters, eyewitness accounts, and recorded interviews with former slaves, together with historical, sociological, economic, and political analyses of this era. The book explores the five major needs of every long-term victim and journeys through these five stages with the Israelite and the African-American slaves on their historical path toward physical and psychological freedom. This rich, multi-dimensional collage of parallel and contrasting experiences is designed to enrich readers’ understanding of the plight of these two groups.
Posted in Religion

The African-American Family in Slavery and Emancipation

Author: Wilma A. Dunaway

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521012164

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 368

View: 2508

This book calls into question the dominant paradigm of the US slave family.
Posted in Business & Economics

Black Odyssey

Author: Nathan Irvin Huggins

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307760243

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 930

This classic work of scholarship and empathy tells the story of the self-creation of the African-American people. It assesses the full impact of the Middle Passage -- "the most traumatizing mass human migration in modern history" -- and of North American slavery both on the enslaved and on those who enslaved them. It explores the ways in which a nominally free society perverted its own freedoms and denied the fact that an inhuman institution lies at the heart of the American experience. The authority and eloquence of this work make it essential reading for all who want to understand the American past and present. From the Trade Paperback edition.
Posted in Social Science

The Invisibles

The Untold Story of African American Slaves in the White House

Author: Jesse Holland

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 1493024191

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 8881

The Invisibles chronicles the African American presence inside the White House from its beginnings in 1782 until 1862, when President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation that granted slaves their freedom. During these years, slaves were the only African Americans to whom the most powerful men in the United States were exposed on a daily, and familiar, basis. By reading about these often-intimate relationships, readers will better understand some of the views that various presidents held about class and race in American society, and how these slaves contributed not only to the life and comforts of the presidents they served, but to America as a whole.
Posted in History

Transformations in Slavery

A History of Slavery in Africa

Author: Paul E. Lovejoy

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139502778

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 9924

This history of African slavery from the fifteenth to the early twentieth centuries examines how indigenous African slavery developed within an international context. Paul E. Lovejoy discusses the medieval Islamic slave trade and the Atlantic trade as well as the enslavement process and the marketing of slaves. He considers the impact of European abolition and assesses slavery's role in African history. The book corrects the accepted interpretation that African slavery was mild and resulted in the slaves' assimilation. Instead, slaves were used extensively in production, although the exploitation methods and the relationships to world markets differed from those in the Americas. Nevertheless, slavery in Africa, like slavery in the Americas, developed from its position on the periphery of capitalist Europe. This new edition revises all statistical material on the slave trade demography and incorporates recent research and an updated bibliography.
Posted in History

Bodyminds Reimagined

(Dis)ability, Race, and Gender in Black Women's Speculative Fiction

Author: Sami Schalk

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822371839

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 192

View: 2283

In Bodyminds Reimagined Sami Schalk traces how black women's speculative fiction complicates the understanding of bodyminds—the intertwinement of the mental and the physical—in the context of race, gender, and (dis)ability. Bridging black feminist theory with disability studies, Schalk demonstrates that this genre's political potential lies in the authors' creation of bodyminds that transcend reality's limitations. She reads (dis)ability in neo-slave narratives by Octavia Butler (Kindred) and Phyllis Alesia Perry (Stigmata) not only as representing the literal injuries suffered under slavery, but also as a metaphor for the legacy of racial violence. The fantasy worlds in works by N. K. Jemisin, Shawntelle Madison, and Nalo Hopkinson—where werewolves have obsessive-compulsive-disorder and blind demons can see magic—destabilize social categories and definitions of the human, calling into question the very nature of identity. In these texts, as well as in Butler’s Parable series, able-mindedness and able-bodiedness are socially constructed and upheld through racial and gendered norms. Outlining (dis)ability's centrality to speculative fiction, Schalk shows how these works open new social possibilities while changing conceptualizations of identity and oppression through nonrealist contexts.
Posted in Literary Criticism

Disability and Difference in Global Contexts

Enabling a Transformative Body Politic

Author: N. Erevelles

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137001186

Category: Social Science

Page: 227

View: 3611

This book explores the possibilities and limitations re-theorizing disability using historical materialism in the interdisciplinary contexts of social theory, cultural studies, social and education policy, feminist ethics, and theories of citizenship.
Posted in Social Science

Self-Taught

African American Education in Slavery and Freedom

Author: Heather Andrea Williams

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807888971

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 4803

In this previously untold story of African American self-education, Heather Andrea Williams moves across time to examine African Americans' relationship to literacy during slavery, during the Civil War, and in the first decades of freedom. Self-Taught traces the historical antecedents to freedpeople's intense desire to become literate and demonstrates how the visions of enslaved African Americans emerged into plans and action once slavery ended. Enslaved people, Williams contends, placed great value in the practical power of literacy, whether it was to enable them to read the Bible for themselves or to keep informed of the abolition movement and later the progress of the Civil War. Some slaves devised creative and subversive means to acquire literacy, and when slavery ended, they became the first teachers of other freedpeople. Soon overwhelmed by the demands for education, they called on northern missionaries to come to their aid. Williams argues that by teaching, building schools, supporting teachers, resisting violence, and claiming education as a civil right, African Americans transformed the face of education in the South to the great benefit of both black and white southerners.
Posted in Social Science