A Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies

Author: Bartolome Las Casas

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 0141912693

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 7958

Bartolomé de Las Casas was the first and fiercest critic of Spanish colonialism in the New World. An early traveller to the Americas who sailed on one of Columbus's voyages, Las Casas was so horrified by the wholesale massacre he witnessed that he dedicated his life to protecting the Indian community. He wrote A Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies in 1542, a shocking catalogue of mass slaughter, torture and slavery, which showed that the evangelizing vision of Columbus had descended under later conquistadors into genocide. Dedicated to Philip II to alert the Castilian Crown to these atrocities and demand that the Indians be entitled to the basic rights of humankind, this passionate work of documentary vividness outraged Europe and contributed to the idea of the Spanish 'Black Legend' that would last for centuries.
Posted in History

The Devastation of the Indies

A Brief Account

Author: Bartolomé de Las Casas

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9780801844300

Category: History

Page: 138

View: 4880

"One of the major sources for the study on the interraction between whites and American Indians during the sixteenth century." -- Journal of the Rocky Mountain Medieval and Renaissance Association
Posted in History

Another Face of Empire

Bartolomé de Las Casas, Indigenous Rights, and Ecclesiastical Imperialism

Author: Daniel Castro

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822339397

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 233

View: 5684

Separating historical reality from myth, this book provides a nuanced, revisionist assessment of the friar's career, writings, and political activities.
Posted in Biography & Autobiography

Support for Crime Victims in a Comparative Perspective

A Collection of Essays Dedicated to the Memory of Prof. Frederic McClintock

Author: Ezzat A. Fattah,Tony Peters

Publisher: Leuven University Press

ISBN: 9789061869276

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 325

A collection of essays dedicated to the memory of Prof. Frederic McClintock.
Posted in Social Science

An Account, Much Abbreviated, of the Destruction of the Indies, with Related Texts

Author: Bartolomé de las Casas

Publisher: Hackett Publishing

ISBN: 9780872206250

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 2888

Fifty years after the arrival of Columbus, at the height of Spain's conquest of the West Indies, Spanish bishop and colonist Bartolomé de las Casas dedicated his Brevísima Relación de la Destruición de las Indias to Philip II of Spain. An impassioned plea on behalf of the native peoples of the West Indies, the Brevísima Relación catalogues in horrific detail atrocities it attributes to the king's colonists in the New World. The result is a withering indictment of the conquerors that has cast a 500-year shadow over the subsequent history of that world and the European colonisation of it. Andrew Hurley's daring new translation dramatically foreshortens that 500 years by reversing the usual priority of a translation; rather than bring the Brevísima Relación to the reader, it brings the reader to the Brevísima Relación -- not as it is, but as it might have been, had it been originally written in English. The translator thus allows himself no words or devices unavailable in English by 1560, and in so doing reveals the prophetic voice, urgency and clarity of the work, qualities often obscured in modern translations. An Introduction by Franklin Knight, notes, a map, and a judicious set of Related Readings offer further aids to a fresh appreciation of this foundational historical and literary work of the New World and European engagement with it.
Posted in History

The Blue Sapphire of the Mind

Notes for a Contemplative Ecology

Author: Douglas E. Christie

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199986649

Category: Religion

Page: 488

View: 5384

"There are no unsacred places," the poet Wendell Berry has written. "There are only sacred places and desecrated places." What might it mean to behold the world with such depth and feeling that it is no longer possible to imagine it as something separate from ourselves, or to live without regard for its well-being? To understand the work of seeing things as an utterly involving moral and spiritual act? Such questions have long occupied the center of contemplative spiritual traditions. In The Blue Sapphire of the Mind, Douglas E. Christie proposes a distinctively contemplative approach to ecological thought and practice that can help restore our sense of the earth as a sacred place. Drawing on the insights of the early Christian monastics as well as the ecological writings of Henry David Thoreau, Aldo Leopold, Annie Dillard, and many others, Christie argues that, at the most basic level, it is the quality of our attention to the natural world that must change if we are to learn how to live in a sustainable relationship with other living organisms and with one another. He notes that in this uniquely challenging historical moment, there is a deep and pervasive hunger for a less fragmented and more integrated way of apprehending and inhabiting the living world--and for a way of responding to the ecological crisis that expresses our deepest moral and spiritual values. Christie explores how the wisdom of ancient and modern contemplative traditions can inspire both an honest reckoning with the destructive patterns of thought and behavior that have contributed so much to our current crisis, and a greater sense of care and responsibility for all living beings. These traditions can help us cultivate the simple, spacious awareness of the enduring beauty and wholeness of the natural world that will be necessary if we are to live with greater purpose and meaning, and with less harm, to our planet.
Posted in Religion

Ancient Origins of the Mexican Plaza

From Primordial Sea to Public Space

Author: Logan Wagner,Hal Box,Susan Kline Morehead

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 029274983X

Category: Architecture

Page: 273

View: 1627

The plaza has been a defining feature of Mexican urban architecture and culture for at least 4,000 years. Ancient Mesoamericans conducted most of their communal life in outdoor public spaces, and today the plaza is still the public living room in every Mexican neighborhood, town, and city—the place where friends meet, news is shared, and personal and communal rituals and celebrations happen. The site of a community's most important architecture—church, government buildings, and marketplace—the plaza is both sacred and secular space and thus the very heart of the community. This extensively illustrated book traces the evolution of the Mexican plaza from Mesoamerican sacred space to modern public gathering place. The authors led teams of volunteers who measured and documented nearly one hundred traditional Mexican town centers. The resulting plans reveal the layers of Mesoamerican and European history that underlie the contemporary plaza. The authors describe how Mesoamericans designed their ceremonial centers as embodiments of creation myths—the plaza as the primordial sea from which the earth emerged. They discuss how Europeans, even though they sought to eradicate native culture, actually preserved it as they overlaid the Mesoamerican sacred plaza with the Renaissance urban concept of an orthogonal grid with a central open space. The authors also show how the plaza's historic, architectural, social, and economic qualities can contribute to mainstream urban design and architecture today.
Posted in Architecture

The Challenge of American History

Author: Louis P. Masur

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9780801862229

Category: History

Page: 331

View: 3302

In The Challenge of American History, Louis Masur brings together a sampling of recent scholarship to determine the key issues preoccupying historians of American history and to contemplate the discipline's direction for the future. The fifteen summary essays included in this volume allow professional historians, history teachers, and students to grasp in a convenient and accessible form what historians have been writing about.
Posted in History

Buried in Shades of Night

Contested Voices, Indian Captivity, and the Legacy of King Philip's War

Author: Billy J. Stratton

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 0816530289

Category: Social Science

Page: 203

View: 5258

"Billy J. Stratton's critical examination of Mary Rowlandson's 1682 publication, The Soveraignty and Goodness of God, reconsiders the role of the captivity narrative in American literary history and national identity. With pivotal new research into Puritan minister Increase Mather's influence on the narrative, Stratton calls for a reconsideration of past scholarly work on the genre"--Provided by publisher.
Posted in Social Science

The Peoples of the Caribbean

An Encyclopedia of Archeology and Traditional Culture

Author: Nicholas J. Saunders

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1576077012

Category: Social Science

Page: 399

View: 4045

Offers a comprehensive guide to the archaeology and traditional culture of the Caribbean.
Posted in Social Science

The Mechanics of Modernity in Europe and East Asia

Institutional Origins of Social Change and Stagnation

Author: Erik Ringmar

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134292635

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 256

View: 7163

Why, from the eighteenth century onwards, did some countries embark on a path of sustained economic growth, while others stagnated? This text looks at the kind of institutions that are required in order for change to take place, and Ringmar concludes that for sustained development to be possible, change must be institutionalized. Taking a global view, Ringmar investigates the implications of his conclusion on issues facing the developing world today.
Posted in Business & Economics

Ecriture Du Voyage Et Mémoire Culturelle

Author: Maria Alzira Seixo

Publisher: Rodopi

ISBN: 9789042004702

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 293

View: 8435

The present volume looks at the relation between travel writing and cultural memory from a variety of perspectives, ranging from theoretical concerns with genres and conventions to detailed analyses of single texts. As befits the topic, the contributions roam far and wide, both geographically and historically. Some detail early Portuguese voyages of discovery, particularly to the East. Others depict encounters between Early, and not so early, Modern Western travelers and their Other interlocutors. Still others focus on travel writings as literature. Voyages and voyaging in literature form the subject of the last category of essays gathered here.Amongst the authors discussed are Fernão Mendes Pinto, Jean de Sponde, Furtado de Mendonça, Sor Juana Inéz de la Cruz, Elsa Morante, Ingeborg Bachmann, Sophia Andresen, Paul Claudel, Graham Greene, Valéry Larbaud, David Mourão-Ferreira, J.M.G. le Clézio, José Saramago, Michel Leiris, and Claude Lévi-Strauss.The volume concludes with an essay by the French-Lebanese author Salah Stétié.
Posted in Literary Criticism

Specters of Conquest

Indigenous Absence in Transatlantic Literatures

Author: Adam Lifshey

Publisher: Fordham University Press

ISBN: 0823232409

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 192

View: 8896

This book intervenes in transatlantic and hemispheric studies by positing Americaas not a particular country or continent but a foundational narrative, in which conquerors arrive at a shore intent on overwriting local versions of humanity, culture, and landscape with inscriptions of their own design. This imposition of foreign textualities, however dominant, is never complete because the absences of the disappeared still linger manifestly, still are present. That apparent paradox results in a haunted America, whose conquest is always partial and whose conquered are always contestatory. Readers of scholarship by transatlanticists such as Paul Gilroy and hemispherists such as Diana Taylor will find new conceptualizations here of an America that knows no geographic boundaries, whose absences are collective but not necessarily interrelated by genealogy. The five principal texts at hand - Columbus's diary of his first voyage, the Popol Vuh of the Maya-K'iche', Defoe's Robinson Crusoe, Evita's Cuando los Combes luchaban (the first African novel in Spanish), and Pynchon's Mason & Dixon - are examined as foundational stories of America in their imaginings of its transatlantic commencement. Interspersed too are shorter studies of narratives by William Carlos Williams, Rigoberta Mench£, μlvar N£¤ez Cabeza de Vaca, Jos Mart¡, Mark Knopfler (former lead singer of Dire Straits) and Gabriel Garc¡a M~rquez. These texts are rarely if ever read together because of their discrete provenances in time and place, yet their juxtaposition reveals how the disjunctions and ruptures that took place on the eastern and western shores of the Atlantic upon the arrival of Europeans became insinuated as recurring and resistant absences in narratives ostensibly contextualized by the Conquest.The book concludes by proposing that Mary Shelley's Frankenstein is the great American novel.After Specters of Conquest: Indigenous Absence in Transatlantic Literatures, America will never seem the same.
Posted in Literary Criticism

The Fish That Ate the Whale

The Life and Times of America's Banana King

Author: Rich Cohen

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN: 1429946296

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 9261

A legendary tale, both true and astonishing, from the author of Israel is Real and Sweet and Low When Samuel Zemurray arrived in America in 1891, he was tall, gangly, and penniless. When he died in the grandest house in New Orleans sixty-nine years later, he was among the richest, most powerful men in the world. In between, he worked as a fruit peddler, a banana hauler, a dockside hustler, and a plantation owner. He battled and conquered the United Fruit Company, becoming a symbol of the best and worst of the United States: proof that America is the land of opportunity, but also a classic example of the corporate pirate who treats foreign nations as the backdrop for his adventures. In Latin America, when people shouted "Yankee, go home!" it was men like Zemurray they had in mind. Rich Cohen's brilliant historical profile The Fish That Ate the Whale unveils Zemurray as a hidden kingmaker and capitalist revolutionary, driven by an indomitable will to succeed. Known as El Amigo, the Gringo, or simply Z, the Banana Man lived one of the great untold stories of the last hundred years. Starting with nothing but a cart of freckled bananas, he built a sprawling empire of banana cowboys, mercenary soldiers, Honduran peasants, CIA agents, and American statesmen. From hustling on the docks of New Orleans to overthrowing Central American governments, from feuding with Huey Long to working with the Dulles brothers, Zemurray emerges as an unforgettable figure, connected to the birth of modern American diplomacy, public relations, business, and war—a monumental life that reads like a parable of the American dream.
Posted in History

Religion Unplugged

Author: Max Swanson

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN: 1456855336

Category: Religion

Page: N.A

View: 6087

Posted in Religion

Spanish Colonization to 1650: Oxford Bibliographies Online Research Guide

Author: Allyson Poska

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199810176

Category:

Page: 24

View: 3731

This ebook is a selective guide designed to help scholars and students of the ancient world find reliable sources of information by directing them to the best available scholarly materials in whatever form or format they appear from books, chapters, and journal articles to online archives, electronic data sets, and blogs. Written by a leading international authority on the subject, the ebook provides bibliographic information supported by direct recommendations about which sources to consult and editorial commentary to make it clear how the cited sources are interrelated. This ebook is just one of many articles from Oxford Bibliographies Online: Atlantic History, a continuously updated and growing online resource designed to provide authoritative guidance through the scholarship and other materials relevant to the study of Atlantic History, the study of the transnational interconnections between Europe, North America, South America, and Africa, particularly in the early modern and colonial period. Oxford Bibliographies Online covers most subject disciplines within the social science and humanities, for more information visit www.oxfordbibliographies.com.
Posted in

A People's History of Florida, 1513-1876

How Africans, Seminoles, Women, and Lower Class Whites Shaped the Sunshine State

Author: Adam Wasserman

Publisher: Adam Wasserman

ISBN: 1442167092

Category: History

Page: 634

View: 3339

Howard Zinn, author of A People's History of the United States, predicted that the bottom class perspective of history would eventually gain ground, enveloping the old way of narrating history as told by the powerful. Since then, numerous historical events have been redefined through the outlook of common people that were involved from the bottom-up, forever altering how we understand history. No more romantic diatribes glittered in patriotic myths. No more traditional heroes, standardized viewpoints, unquestionable "facts," or generalized falsehoods. Just plain raw truth that is not afraid to stampede powerful governments with the herd of popular outrage. A People's History of Florida follows the People's History tradition, documenting the active involvement of African-Americans, indigenous people, women, and poor whites in shaping the Sunshine State's history.
Posted in History