A Disability History of the United States

Author: Kim E. Nielsen

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 0807022039

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 4689

The first book to cover the entirety of disability history, from pre-1492 to the present Disability is not just the story of someone we love or the story of whom we may become; rather it is undoubtedly the story of our nation. Covering the entirety of US history from pre-1492 to the present, A Disability History of the United States is the first book to place the experiences of people with disabilities at the center of the American narrative. In many ways, it’s a familiar telling. In other ways, however, it is a radical repositioning of US history. By doing so, the book casts new light on familiar stories, such as slavery and immigration, while breaking ground about the ties between nativism and oralism in the late nineteenth century and the role of ableism in the development of democracy. A Disability History of the United States pulls from primary-source documents and social histories to retell American history through the eyes, words, and impressions of the people who lived it. As historian and disability scholar Nielsen argues, to understand disability history isn’t to narrowly focus on a series of individual triumphs but rather to examine mass movements and pivotal daily events through the lens of varied experiences. Throughout the book, Nielsen deftly illustrates how concepts of disability have deeply shaped the American experience—from deciding who was allowed to immigrate to establishing labor laws and justifying slavery and gender discrimination. Included are absorbing—at times horrific—narratives of blinded slaves being thrown overboard and women being involuntarily sterilized, as well as triumphant accounts of disabled miners organizing strikes and disability rights activists picketing Washington. Engrossing and profound, A Disability History of the United States fundamentally reinterprets how we view our nation’s past: from a stifling master narrative to a shared history that encompasses us all.
Posted in Social Science

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 0807022020

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 4387

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A Disability History of the United States (Large Print 16pt)

Author: Kim E. Nielsen

Publisher: ReadHowYouWant

ISBN: 9781459660984

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 1228

The first book to cover the entirety of disability history, from pre - 1492 to the present.By placing the experiences of people with disabilities at the center of the American story, "A Disability History of the United States" fundamentally reinterprets how we view our nation's past. Throughout the book Kim Nielsen illustrates how concepts of disability have deeply shaped the American exxperience - from deciding who was allowed to immigrate to establishing labor laws and justifying slavery and gender discrimation. The book abounds with compelling stories pulled from primary documents and social histories to retell American history through the eyes, words, and impressions of the people who lived it. Included are absorbing - at times horrific - narratives of blinded slaves being thrown overboard and women being involuntarily sterilized, as well as triumphant accounts of miners organizing and disability rights activists marching on Washington.Engrossing and revelatory, "A Disability History of the United States" reconstructs our nation's tory - from a narrow master narrative to a shared history that encompasses us all. As Kim Nielsen writes, disability is ''our story, the story of someone we love, the story of whom we may become, and it is undoubtedly the story of our nation.''
Posted in History

A Queer History of the United States

Author: Michael Bronski

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 0807044660

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 3606

Winner of a 2012 Stonewall Book Award in nonfiction The first book to cover the entirety of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender history, from pre-1492 to the present. In the 1620s, Thomas Morton broke from Plymouth Colony and founded Merrymount, which celebrated same-sex desire, atheism, and interracial marriage. Transgender evangelist Jemima Wilkinson, in the early 1800s, changed her name to “Publick Universal Friend,” refused to use pronouns, fought for gender equality, and led her own congregation in upstate New York. In the mid-nineteenth century, internationally famous Shakespearean actor Charlotte Cushman led an openly lesbian life, including a well-publicized “female marriage.” And in the late 1920s, Augustus Granville Dill was fired by W. E. B. Du Bois from the NAACP’s magazine the Crisis after being arrested for a homosexual encounter. These are just a few moments of queer history that Michael Bronski highlights in this groundbreaking book. Intellectually dynamic and endlessly provocative, A Queer History of the United States is more than a “who’s who” of queer history: it is a book that radically challenges how we understand American history. Drawing upon primary documents, literature, and cultural histories, noted scholar and activist Michael Bronski charts the breadth of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender history, from 1492 to the 1990s, and has written a testament to how the LGBT experience has profoundly shaped our country, culture, and history. A Queer History of the United States abounds with startling examples of unknown or often ignored aspects of American history—the ineffectiveness of sodomy laws in the colonies, the prevalence of cross-dressing women soldiers in the Civil War, the impact of new technologies on LGBT life in the nineteenth century, and how rock music and popular culture were, in large part, responsible for the devastating backlash against gay rights in the late 1970s. Most striking, Bronski documents how, over centuries, various incarnations of social purity movements have consistently attempted to regulate all sexuality, including fantasies, masturbation, and queer sex. Resisting these efforts, same-sex desire flourished and helped make America what it is today. At heart, A Queer History of the United States is simply about American history. It is a book that will matter both to LGBT people and heterosexuals. This engrossing and revelatory history will make readers appreciate just how queer America really is. From the Hardcover edition.
Posted in History

Mental Retardation in America

A Historical Reader

Author: Steven Noll,James Trent

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814782485

Category: History

Page: 513

View: 2772

A collection of essays and documents chronicilizing the history of treatment, labeling, and understanding of mental retardating in the U.S. NYUP is one the forefront of publishing in disability studies.
Posted in History

Downs

The History of a Disability

Author: David Wright

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019956793X

Category: Medical

Page: 239

View: 4793

Editorial Advisor, Helen Bynum is a freelancer historian and author. --Book Jacket.
Posted in Medical

What We Have Done

An Oral History of the Disability Rights Movement

Author: Fred Pelka

Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press

ISBN: 1558499199

Category: History

Page: 622

View: 2628

"Nothing about us without us" has been a core principle of American disability rights activists for more than half a century. It represents a response by people with disabilities to being treated with scorn and abuse or as objects of pity, and to having the most fundamental decisions relating to their lives--where they would live; if and how they would be educated; if they would be allowed to marry or have families; indeed, if they would be permitted to live at all--made by those who were, in the parlance of the movement, "temporarily able-bodied." In What We Have Done: An Oral History of the Disability Rights Movement, Fred Pelka takes that slogan at face value. He presents the voices of disability rights activists who, in the period from 1950 to 1990, transformed how society views people with disabilities, and recounts how the various streams of the movement came together to push through the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, the most sweeping civil rights legislation since passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Beginning with the stories of those who grew up with disabilities in the 1940s and '50s, the book traces how disability came to be seen as a political issue, and how people with disabilities--often isolated, institutionalized, and marginalized--forged a movement analogous to the civil rights, women's rights, and gay rights movements, and fought for full and equal participation in American society.
Posted in History

The Oxford Handbook of Disability History

Author: Michael Rembis,Catherine J. Kudlick,Kim Nielsen

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190234954

Category: History

Page: 552

View: 413

Disability history exists outside of the institutions, healers, and treatments it often brings to mind. It is a history where disabled people live not just as patients or cure-seekers, but rather as people living differently in the world--and it is also a history that helps define the fundamental concepts of identity, community, citizenship, and normality. The Oxford Handbook of Disability History is the first volume of its kind to represent this history and its global scale, from ancient Greece to British West Africa. The twenty-seven articles, written by thirty experts from across the field, capture the diversity and liveliness of this emerging scholarship. Whether discussing disability in modern Chinese cinema or on the American antebellum stage, this collection provides new and valuable insights into the rich and varied lives of disabled people across time and place.
Posted in History

No Pity

People with Disabilities Forging a New Civil Rights Movement

Author: Joseph P. Shapiro

Publisher: Broadway Books

ISBN: 0307798321

Category: Political Science

Page: 400

View: 9865

People with disabilities forging the newest and last human rights movement of the century. From the Trade Paperback edition.
Posted in Political Science

A Renegade History of the United States

Author: Thaddeus Russell

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1416576134

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 5512

Aruges that criminals, prostitutes, rebels and other people on the fringes of society were largely responsible for such American achievements as the American Revolution, labor unions, women's liberation, the fall of the Soviet Union, gay rights and much more. By the author of Out of the Jungle: Jimmy Hoffa and the Re-Making of the American Working Class.
Posted in History

Inventing the Feeble Mind

A History of Intellectual Disability in the United States

Author: James W. Trent

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199396183

Category:

Page: 392

View: 592

Pity, disgust, fear, cure, and prevention - all are words that Americans have used to make sense of what today we call intellectual disability. Inventing the Feeble Mind explores the history of this disability from its several identifications over the past 200 years: idiocy, imbecility,feeblemindedness, mental defect, mental deficiency, mental retardation, and most recently intellectual disability. Using institutional records, private correspondence, personal memories, and rare photographs, James Trent argues that the economic vulnerability of intellectually disabled people (andoften their families), more than the claims made for their intellectual and social limitations, has shaped meaning, services, and policies in United States history.
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Defectives in the Land

Disability and Immigration in the Age of Eugenics

Author: Douglas C. Baynton

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022636433X

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 6811

Immigration history has largely focused on the restriction of immigrants by race and ethnicity, overlooking disability as a crucial factor in the crafting of the image of the “undesirable immigrant.” Defectives in the Land, Douglas C. Baynton’s groundbreaking new look at immigration and disability, aims to change this. In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Baynton explains, immigration restriction in the United States was primarily intended to keep people with disabilities—known as “defectives”—out of the country. The list of those included is long: the deaf, blind, epileptic, and mobility impaired; people with curved spines, hernias, flat or club feet, missing limbs, and short limbs; those unusually short or tall; people with intellectual or psychiatric disabilities; intersexuals; men of “poor physique” and men diagnosed with “feminism.” Not only were disabled individuals excluded, but particular races and nationalities were also identified as undesirable based on their supposed susceptibility to mental, moral, and physical defects. In this transformative book, Baynton argues that early immigration laws were a cohesive whole—a decades-long effort to find an effective method of excluding people considered to be defective. This effort was one aspect of a national culture that was increasingly fixated on competition and efficiency, anxious about physical appearance and difference, and haunted by a fear of hereditary defect and the degeneration of the American race.
Posted in History

Nothing about Us Without Us

Disability Oppression and Empowerment

Author: James I. Charlton

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520224810

Category: Political Science

Page: 197

View: 9451

"A study of the global oppression of people with disabilities and the international movement that has recently emerged to resist it ... A theoretical overview of disability oppression that shows its similarities to, and differences from, racism, sexism, and colonialism."--Jacket.
Posted in Political Science

An African American and Latinx History of the United States

Author: Paul Ortiz

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 0807013102

Category: HISTORY

Page: 276

View: 8838

"Spanning more than two hundred years, An African American and Latinx History of the United States is a revolutionary, politically charged narrative history, arguing that the "Global South" was crucial to the development of America as we know it. Scholar and activist Paul Ortiz challenges the notion of westward progress as exalted by widely taught formulations such as "manifest destiny" and "Jacksonian democracy, " and shows how placing African American, Latinx, and Indigenous voices unapologetically front and center transforms US history into one of the working class organizing against imperialism. Drawing on rich narratives and primary source documents, Ortiz links racial segregation in the Southwest and the rise and violent fall of a powerful tradition of Mexican labor organizing in the twentieth century, to May 1, 2006, known as International Workers' Day, when migrant laborers--Chicana/os, Afrocubanos, and immigrants from every continent on earth--united in resistance on the first "Day Without Immigrants." As African American civil rights activists fought against Jim Crow laws and Mexican labor organizers warred against the suffocating grip of capitalism, Black and Spanish-language newspapers, abolitionists, and Latin American revolutionaries coalesced around movements built between people from the United States and people from Central America and the Caribbean. And in stark contrast to the resurgence of "America first" rhetoric, Black and Latinx intellectuals and organizers today have urged the United States to build bridges of solidarity with the nations of the America. Incisive and timely, this bottom-up history, told from the interconnected vantage points of Latinx and African Americas, reveals the radically different ways that people of the diaspora have addressed issues still plaguing the United States today, and it offers a way forward in the continued struggle for universal civil rights."--Dust jacket.
Posted in HISTORY

The Disability Rights Movement

From Charity to Confrontation

Author: Doris Zames Fleischer,Fleischer Doris Zames,Frieda Zames

Publisher: Temple University Press

ISBN: 9781439904213

Category: Political Science

Page: 311

View: 1155

The struggle for disability rights in the U.S.
Posted in Political Science

The Routledge History of Disability

Author: Roy Hanes,Ivan Brown,Nancy E. Hansen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351774034

Category: History

Page: 514

View: 3181

The Routledge History of Disability explores the shifting attitudes towards and representations of disabled people from the age of antiquity to the twenty-first century. Taking an international view of the subject, this wide-ranging collection shows that the history of disability cuts across racial, ethnic, religious, cultural, gender and class divides, highlighting the commonalities and differences between the experiences of disabled persons in global historical context. The book is arranged in four parts, covering histories of disabilities across various time periods and cultures, histories of national disability policies, programs and services, histories of education and training and the ways in which disabled people have been seen and treated in the last few decades. Within this, the twenty-eight chapters discuss topics such as developments in disability issues during the late Ottoman period, the history of disability in Belgian Congo in the early twentieth century, blind asylums in nineteenth-century Scotland and the systematic killing of disabled children in Nazi Germany. Illustrated with images and tables and providing an overview of how various countries, cultures and societies have addressed disability over time, this comprehensive volume offers a global perspective on this rapidly growing field and is a valuable resource for scholars of disability studies and histories of disabilities.
Posted in History

An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States

Author: Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz

Publisher: Singapore Books

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 1682

The first history of the United States told from the perspective of indigenous peoples Today in the United States, there are more than five hundred federally recognized Indigenous nations comprising nearly three million people, descendants of the fifteen million Native people who once inhabited this land. The centuries-long genocidal program of the US settler-colonial regimen has largely been omitted from history. Now, for the first time, acclaimed historian and activist Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz offers a history of the United States told from the perspective of Indigenous peoples and reveals how Native Americans, for centuries, actively resisted expansion of the US empire. In An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States, Dunbar-Ortiz adroitly challenges the founding myth of the United States and shows how policy against the Indigenous peoples was colonialist and designed to seize the territories of the original inhabitants, displacing or...
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Disability Histories

Author: Susan Burch,Michael Rembis

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 025209669X

Category: Social Science

Page: 448

View: 7681

The field of disability history continues to evolve rapidly. In this collection, Susan Burch and Michael Rembis present nineteen essays that integrate critical analysis of gender, race, historical context, and other factors to enrich and challenge the traditional modes of interpretation still dominating the field. As the first collection of its kind in over a decade, Disability Histories not only brings readers up to date on scholarship within the field but fosters the process of moving it beyond the U.S. and Western Europe by offering work on Africa, South America, and Asia. The result is a broad range of readings that open new vistas for investigation and study while encouraging scholars at all levels to redraw the boundaries that delineate who and what is considered of historical value. Informed and accessible, Disability Histories is essential for classrooms engaged in all facets of disability studies within and across disciplines. Contributors are Frances Bernstein, Daniel Blackie, Pamela Block, Elsbeth Bösl, Dea Boster, Susan K. Cahn, Alison Carey, Fatima Cavalcante, Jagdish Chander, Audra Jennings, John Kinder, Catherine Kudlick, Paul R. D. Lawrie, Herbert Muyinda, Kim E. Nielsen, Katherine Ott, Stephen Pemberton, Anne Quartararo, Amy Renton, and Penny Richards.
Posted in Social Science

Rights Enabled

The Disability Revolution, from the US, to Germany and Japan, to the United Nations

Author: Katharina Heyer

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 0472052470

Category: Political Science

Page: 250

View: 1225

A comparative study of the adaptation of a civil rights approach to disability in different national and international contexts
Posted in Political Science

The Girl in the Picture

The Story of Kim Phuc, the Photograph, and the Vietnam War

Author: Denise Chong

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781440684128

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 4787

On June 8, 1972, nine-year-old Kim Phuc, severely burned by napalm, ran from her blazing village in South Vietnam and into the eye of history. Her photograph-one of the most unforgettable images of the twentieth century-was seen around the world and helped turn public opinion against the Vietnam War. This book is the story of how that photograph came to be-and the story of what happened to that girl after the camera shutter closed. Award-winning biographer Denise Chong's portrait of Kim Phuc-who eventually defected to Canada and is now a UNESCO spokesperson-is a rare look at the Vietnam War from the Vietnamese point-of-view and one of the only books to describe everyday life in the wake of this war and to probe its lingering effects on all its participants.
Posted in History